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  2. Mrcumbia

    Mrcumbia: Prozac 25 years

    Thank you ChesieCat for the heads up I will definitely be implementing your suggestion. Cheers
  3. ChessieCat

    Mrcumbia: Prozac 25 years

    It would be a good idea to wait at least 1 week before reducing. It takes about 4 days for a dose change to get to full level in the blood and a bit longer for it to register in the brain. Even though you won't be making a dose change, the way/speed the body "absorbs" the dose may be different. It's better to take a bit longer than to risk causing problems.
  4. Today
  5. Mrcumbia

    Mrcumbia: Prozac 25 years

    After doing some more reading I guess I feel more comfortable giving it a shot. I think I am going to try taking half the tablet and the other half mixed in water to start off with and hold for a few days before trying a reduction just to make sure I don't get any weird symptoms and see how that goes. I also came across BrassMonkeys method for splitting the dose reduction across 4 weeks and then doing a 2 week hold before starting another reduction. I found it very interesting and might end up giving that a try for the 5% dose reduction which would mean 1.25% reduction per week. Thank you so much everyone who has responded to my questions! I really appreciate it. I'll keep you guys posted on my progress. If anyone has any more tips or suggestions please don't hesitate to send them over.
  6. ChessieCat

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    Hi bmi, I've moved you new post to your Introduction topic. This keeps your history in one place. Only 1 Introduction topic per member. Q: Is your last post an update or do you have a specific question? If you have a question please post again and ask it clearly so that someone can respond. Thank you. To make it easier to see your drug history please create your drug signature. Please include any other drugs you have previously or are currently taking. Instructions for what is needed: please-summarize-your-withdrawal-history-in-your-signature This link goes to your signature. Remember to Save after creating/editing it. Account Settings – Create or Edit a signature Thank you.
  7. Csilover

    Csilover: What to do? Effexor

    @Altostrata she said she was willing to bridge me but I’d probably have to request it to be a specific way. I’m assuming they’d just cold switch me over instead of gradually going over. How would I ask them to go about it? That makes sense.
  8. Are you able to add doses for these please? Thanks. Abilify - October 2019 - February 2020 (cold turkey) Latuda - March 2020 - April 2020 (cold turkey) Are you able to provide the tapering dates and doses and include the last dose of Lamictal that you took? Thanks. Lamictal - February 2020 - June 2020 (tapered off 100mg May through June)
  9. @RachelSusan That's my thinking too. This sounds like a reasonable plan. Thank you. I wonder why you got slammed from out of nowhere? Do you have any theories? Were your symptoms debilitating, and if so, for how long? Are you better now? Did you have to updose? Sorry to interrogate you, but you are way ahead of me on this journey, and not only have I grown to genuinely care about you, but I'm curious as to what might or might not lie ahead for me. You've been so kind to me, and you've fought the good fight for so long. It breaks my heart that you are struggling. I guess I was foolishly under the assumption that, generally speaking, waves and windows more often occurred in connection with CT or stabilization, not a slow, methodical taper like yours. I'm so disheartened at the moment. It's been a very rough day.
  10. Yesterday
  11. RachelSusan

    RachelSusan: Zoloft - on, off and reinstated

    @Dejavu Hi Dejavu, Sorry to hear you are suffering. It was suggested to me at one point that I do a Prozac bridge but I am not sure why, nor do I recall who suggested it. My thoughts were that I got into this situation by making too many changes too quickly so I didn't want to make yet another change. I do know that sometimes people do change medications because one is considered easier to get off than another but for me it just didn't feel like the right choice. You may feel it is right for you. I too had a nice taper going for a while about two years ago and for some reason one day I just got slammed. I considered up dosing as well but I just decided to ride it out. Again this was my choice, you may make a different choice. You say that you have felt terrible for the last five days and while it is a long time to feel terrible you know that in our Zoloft world it isn't a long time at all. It takes forever for the symptoms to go away with this drug. If you could possibly give yourself another nine days before you decide to up dose it could work out for you. I say this because five and nine make up 14 days, two weeks. Two weeks might give your body a chance to settle down. If at that period you havne't seen any improvement you may want to consider up-dosing, or not. Whatever you feel comfortable with. If you are starting to see any improvement at the two week period then you know you are on the right track and you don't have to change anything. And we know our bodies don't like change when it comes to this drug. I know it is terribly frustrating to be doing so well and this happens. Actually it is more than frustrating, it's probably down right frightening. But it will pass. You will improve once more. This time around should hopefully be a little better because you know what to expect. As to my symptoms I've had everything single one since I started to taper. Remember I have been doing this since 2016. Currently my symptoms are waking with the cortisol spikes and then having internal tremors anywhere from ten to thirty minutes. I had these symptoms early on and though I was done with them, but no they are back. It is a most confounding situation. To recap, I am sorry you are going through this but I do believe it is temporary and shortly you will start to feel better. Warm wishes, R
  12. Thank you. This is an awesome post and immensely helpful. As an update, I've communicated more about the difficulties to my supervisor and HR. We're working on a reasonable accommodation and I'm probably going to take a few weeks off in the near term. That time will let me focus on the acute issues without the work stress. Coming back,it should be more manageable with whatever accommodation we work out--different work,maybe part time. In my line of work, this isnt a long term solution but it will buy me time to keep making progress. Typing on my phone so going to keep this short but to reiterate, thank you so much!
  13. I wrote this to someone, and I’m placing it here, too: SI is very infrequent for me now. Do not lose hope that it will stop. It will. Someone asked me to describe SI. That is hard when I’m not experiencing it. It’s a feeling of deep despair, and the thought that nothing will ever be ok again is a big part. Constant terror was a large part of SI for me. I no longer feel terror. That is gone. I sometimes feel afraid, but it’s not terror, and it passes quickly. I’m not afraid to be alone; I’m not afraid to go out either. I still have anticipatory anxiety if I have something to do. Not all the time, but, to some degree or another, most of the times I have a commitments. SI was so perplexing — maddeningly so. I knew I didn’t want to die. I was afraid I would die in various ways, but I was also afraid of being the cause of my own death. This was so hard to understand, because I didn’t want to die. The fear that I would do that to myself was something I had never, ever thought possible. Anytime I had depression before there was never outright fear of doing something I did not want to do! I did not want to die, but the thought that I wanted to die was a very frequent intrusive thought. There were a few times I wanted to die when I had a particularly difficult day that my husband could not handle well, but most of the time what I wanted was for the emotional pain to end, and I saw no other way for that to happen. If you think about it, you will realize that is also true for you. There is another way! You must believe me. You cannot go around. Going through is the only way, and it’s hard and awful and miserable, but you must see it as a viable way. You must believe me when I say I am glad that I went through instead of around, because going around means there will never be any future. I am living in that future, and it is not yet a full life, but I do feel pleasure now; I do feel joy; I do live. I just have periodic timeouts the timing of which I have no control. I promise you, I am grateful for this life however disappointing it may be at times. This morning I made muffins. I can cook sometimes; I can enjoy a walk; I can enjoy my child. I think SI is caused by a combination of the brain being in an unnatural state AND the fact that one is “just surviving” while not experiencing any pleasure or enjoyment (anhedonia or worse). This is happening because the brain is not operating properly in the wake of the drug. The same is true of aka. In fact, my belief is that aka causes suicidal thoughts independently of it causing restlessness or pacing or a vibrating feeling in the limbs. This is based on having experienced it over and over and over for many years now. You must never cut yourself off from your future, because your future is bright. Do not let your brain tell you otherwise! Our brains are constantly talking to us even when we don’t realize it. I used to think this was something odd about me, but it’s a normal human occurrence. What the brain says to us is what can help or hurt. When we are in WD the brain says a lot of negative things. The key is to distract yourself from your negative thoughts. If you can turn your negative thoughts into less drastically negative thoughts that, too, will help. Banish “always” and “never.“ All or nothing thinking is a huge part of depression and a huge part of WD. Nothing is always or never true. You know that. Don’t let your malfunctioning brain tell you otherwise. Talk back to it! It’s maddening that this syndrome can’t be fixed by simply providing the drug again, but it’s true. The “chemical” feeling comes from the fact that you can’t make sense of your thoughts and emotions, I would say, but there may be something more to it such as depersonalization. It’s so bizarre. What you are feeling and experiencing is “normal.” It IS normal for this state of PAWS (or dysautonomia) which we call withdrawal or prolonged withdrawal syndrome. You aren’t an outlier, but it is never going to FEEL normal to you. It is absolutely logical to deduce that because you are not seeing improvement this must be permanent for you. Because our experiences with every other illness or injury have shown us that healing happens within 20 months, we can’t wrap our minds around this syndrome. I had all the same doubts as you do. Those doubts sneak in during a bad wave, too. Will I go back and forth between feeling normal and periodically declining into madness for the rest of my life? I know the answer is “No,” but it’s still hard to remember that in a bad wave. In a milder wave, I can remember it. I have seen people write the opposite of “mental issues go away first” many times. Instead, a lot of people say that they go last. I think the truth is in between. People focus most acutely on things that disturb them most, of course. Some people have aka and some don’t or at least it’s a very mild aka. When aka goes, the most terrible emotional states will go. I have seen no evidence that the longer the symptom lasts the more likely it is to be permanent. All of us will heal. ****I think that what causes very long periods of WD is re-injury. This is my focus: avoiding re-injury.**** I decided long ago that being “re-injured” is the main way that people suffer WD that lasts a long time. I combed through thread after thread on SA of all the people stating that they were having years of WD. Almost every single one had either tried to reinstate the drug, tried a new drug or had made some unfortunate mistake by taking a drug or drinking alcohol. Re-injury can happen with the use of over the counter drugs, alcohol, and of course, prescription drugs. Steroids, adrenaline based numbing agents at the dentist, and alcohol seem to be the most common substances to prolong WD, in my opinion. Dysautonomia can be slight and easily correctable by our bodies or very deep. It can take a long time to correct, but almost always the key is letting the body heal itself. Once someone is in WD and outside the safe time period for reinstatement, I feel that avoiding re-injury is the best plan, and I believe it works 99% of the time. This is what SA means by a harm reduction approach — for those who are tapering small reductions are advised and for everyone — on or off the AD — being very careful with what we put in our bodies is imperative. (Reinstatement has a place for some people soon after quitting or reducing a drug. That’s not a subject I’m addressing here.) I made a lot of mistakes before I found SA. I missed doses, I increased the AD too much, of course, and I took Zanax here and there, also on the advice of the doctor. I thought that by being careful to avoid addiction to Xanax I would avoid it’s harm. Wrong! My state of dysautonomia meant that Xanax injured me every time I used it. The same is true for when I drank wine. Eventually, I quit 150 mg of Zoloft over a very short period of time — about six weeks perhaps. I did this because I was experiencing dysautonomia. I felt so bad that I thought that the drug was causing me to feel bad. I didn’t know about SA. So, my nervous system was all ready severely compromised before I was prescribed Trazodone afterward. Taking a new prescription caused further destabilization of my nervous system, and every time I too Xanax, my system became further destabilized. Finally, I quit all prescriptions at once. I had no idea it could get worse - so much worse! Since I found SA, I have improved my health a lot by avoiding new prescriptions and alcohol, making sure the dentist gives me a non-Adrenalin numbing agent, and walking. Walking is very important for everyone, and it seems to help unless I’m in a deep wave. Maybe it helps then, but it seems as if it doesn’t. You will heal. I am living proof.
  14. I had heard about the diet-- yes, he and she had both talked about the all-meat diet, and I kept thinking that that is not that healthy.... They say they found reprieve from the diet... But, despite their claims at the time I thought and still think that our body needs a balanced diet. I understand not everyone can tolerate all foods, and some have to be eliminated -- but making very drastic changes to a diet and eating only one type of food, and eliminating a whole set of nutrients must somehow affect our brain, and our nervous system...
  15. Rosetta

    Elyssa143: Zoloft to Zyprexa

    Elyssa, I could have written that at one time. It is very, very hard to live that way day after day. I understand exactly what you are saying. Someday, you will start to see the difference between windows and waves and between shallow waves and deep waves. For now, it’s going to be hard to keep up hope, but please trust me, you will get better to the point that you start to see the hope. Describing SI is hard when I’m not experiencing it. It’s a feeling of deep despair and the thought that nothing will ever be ok again is a big part. Constant terror was a large part of SI for me. I no longer feel terror. That is gone. I sometimes feel afraid, but it’s not terror, and it passes quickly. I’m not afraid to be alone; I’m not afraid to go out either. I still have anticipatory anxiety if I have something to do. Not all the time, but, to some degree or another, most of the times I have a commitments. SI was so perplexing — maddeningly so. I knew I didn’t want to die. I was afraid I would die in various ways, but I was also afraid of being the cause of my own death. This was so hard to understand, because I didn’t want to die. The fear that I would do that to myself was something I had never, ever thought possible. Anytime I had depression before there was never outright fear of doing something I did not want to do! I did not want to die, but the thought that I wanted to die was a very frequent intrusive thought. There were a few times I wanted to die when I had a particularly difficult day that my husband could not handle well, but most of the time what I wanted was for the emotional pain to end, and I saw no other way for that to happen. There is another way, Elyssa! You must believe me. You cannot go around. Going through is the only way, and it’s hard and awful and miserable, but you must see it as a viable way. You must believe me when I say I am glad that I went through instead of around, because going around means there will never be any future. I am living in that future, and it is not yet a full life, but I do feel pleasure now; I do feel joy; I do live. I just have periodic timeouts the timing of which I have no control. I promise you, I am grateful for this life however disappointing it may be at times. This morning I made muffin. I can cook sometimes; I can enjoy a walk; I can enjoy my child. I think SI is caused by a combination of the brain being in an unnatural state AND the fact that you are “just surviving” while not experiencing any pleasure or enjoyment (anhedonia or worse). This is happening because your brain is not operating properly in the wake of the drug. The same is true of aka. In fact, my belief is that aka causes suicidal thoughts independently of it causing restlessness or pacing or a vibrating feeling in the limbs. This is based on having experienced it over and over and over for many years now. You must never cut yourself off from your future, because your future is bright. Do not let your brain tell you otherwise! Our brains are constantly talking to us even when we don’t realize it. I used to think this was something odd about me, but it’s a normal human occurrence. What the brain says to us is what can help or hurt. When we are in WD the brain says a lot of negative things. The key is to distract yourself from your negative thoughts. If you can turn your negative thoughts into less drastically negative thoughts that too will help. Banish “always” and “never.“ All or nothing thinking is a huge part of depression and a huge part of WD. Nothing is always or never true. You know that. Don’t let your malfunctioning brain tell you otherwise. Talk back to it! It’s maddening that this syndrome can’t be fixed by simply providing the drug again, but it’s true. The “chemical” feeling comes from the fact that you can’t make sense of your thoughts and emotions, I would say, but there may be something more to it such as depersonalization. It’s so bizarre. I can see that you need validation that what you are feeling and experiencing is normal. It IS normal for this state of PAWS (or dysautonomia) which we call withdrawal or prolonged withdrawal syndrome. You aren’t an outlier, but it is never going to FEEL normal to you. It is absolutely logical to deduce that because you are not seeing improvement this must be permanent for you. Because our experiences with every other illness or injury have shown us that healing happens within 20 months, we can’t wrap our minds around this syndrome. I had all the same doubts as you do. Those doubts sneak in during a bad wave, too. Will I go back and forth between feeling normal and periodically declining into madness for the rest of my life? I know the answer is “No,” but it’s still hard to remember that in a bad wave. In a milder wave, I can remember it. I have seen people write the opposite of “mental issues go away first” many times. Instead, a lot of people say that they go last. I think the truth is in between. People focus most acutely on things that disturb them most, of course. Some people have aka and some don’t or at least it’s a very mild aka. When aka goes, the most terrible emotional states will go. I have seen no evidence that the longer the symptom lasts the more likely it is to be permanent. All of us will heal. ****I think that what causes very long periods of WD is re-injury. This is my focus: avoiding re-injury.**** I decided long ago that being “re-injured” is the main way that people suffer WD that lasts a long time. I combed through thread after thread on SA of all the people stating that they were having years of WD. Almost every single one had either tried to reinstate the drug, tried a new drug or had made some unfortunate mistake by taking a drug or drinking alcohol. Re-injury can happen with the use of over the counter drugs, alcohol, and of course, prescription drugs. Steroids, adrenaline based numbing agents at the dentist, and alcohol seem to be the most common substances to prolong WD, in my opinion. Dysautonomia can be slight and easily correctable by our bodies or very deep. It can take a long time to correct, but almost always the key is letting the body heal itself. Once someone is in WD and outside the safe time period for reinstatement, I feel that avoiding re-injury is the best plan, and I believe it works 99% of the time. This is what SA means by a harm reduction approach — for those who are tapering small reductions are advised and for everyone — in or off the AD — being very careful with what we put in our bodies is imperative. (Reinstatement has a place for some people soon after quitting or reducing a drug. That’s not a subject I’m addressing here.) I made a lot of mistakes before I found SA. I missed doses, I increased the AD too much, of course, and took Zanax also on the advice of the doctor. I drank wine. I quit Zoloft. My nervous system was all ready severely compromised before I was prescribed Trazodone. Taking new prescriptions caused further destabilization of my nervous system. Finally, I quit all prescriptions at once, but since then, I have improved my health a lot by avoiding new prescriptions and alcohol, making sure the dentist gives me a non-Adrenalin numbing agent, and walking. Walking is very important for everyone, and it seems to help unless I’m in a deep wave. Maybe it helps then, but it seems as if it doesn’t. You are doing the right things, Elyssa. You are doing the right thing by taking no drugs. That alone means you will heal. I am living proof. 💜 Rosetta
  16. I have experience with this. I'm limping along in my job and not sure what is going to happen. I understand. It feels really, really bad a lot of the time to me too. You are not alone. I would say to try not to confuse your *internal experience* of how it feels for you at work, with your actual performance/productivity, as noticed by your supervisor. I think your instinct not to share much about what is going on is a good one. Just try to focus on the task in front of you when you are at work. Know that it is possible to get through difficulty focusing at work and have it improve. I went through a very, very difficult time focusing after I returned from 10 weeks or so on disability. But I got through it and so far I've managed to hold onto the same job. I just keep going to work. Even if I think I’m doing a crappy job and even if I think I’m going to get fired, I keep going. One benefit that I've found to working in withdrawal is that it provides structure and gets me out of myself. Still, a lot of the time I wish I could go on disability or retire. You sound like a high achiever. I have that same trait. Just going through withdrawal is enough now, though. Don't put being a high achiever on your plate. And consider this too--when you're at work, you're surrounded by healthy people who do not have significant disabilities! You cannot and should not expect yourself to be able to perform at their level! It isn't a level playing field. Start counting from zero, not 100. You have a job. You are maintaining it in withdrawal. You are maintaining it during a pandemic. That's huge. The other things to consider are the impact of any of your decisions on your family. I would encourage you to try to preserve the structure and relationships in your life during withdrawal to the best of your ability. If you can’t, you can’t. But it’s important to try. For example, if you were to quit your job, you would have another set of problems. Instead of being focused on work, your anxiety may change to be focused on the future, on finances, on anything else. Lack of structure. Childcare. Financial problems, possibly marital problems, and the need to eventually get another job, unless you’re independently wealthy. You may also experience loss of confidence in yourself. I wasn’t able to work for 10 weeks or so when I was in acute withdrawal. And you know what I found that I wanted most during that time? To be back at work! [I laugh at that now but it was so true at the time.] Some other options include working part time or working in a less stressful job. Sometimes, it really is impossible to work during withdrawal. Just know that not working has its own set of problems as well. I hope this is helpful on some level. I get angry at the unfairness when people lose things they’ve worked very hard for; that’s why I’m trying to say to preserve what you can. Because losing things comes with its own set of grief and problems and that may end up compounding your problems. I think taking time off to regroup is a good idea. Walking away from your job entirely is a serious decision and would encourage you to think through all the possible ramifications, or have some kind of plan if you can, before considering that. It’s hard to think clearly in withdrawal.
  17. Sending you healing thoughts today!
  18. marie123

    Shebon: intro and brief history

    Hi Shebon. Congrats on getting to your halfway milestone. You're getting close! I remember when I was that low on trazodone I couldn't weight it anymore as it was not registering. What I did was crushing a small piece on a mirror and dividing it by 2, then dividing it again and again until I had a bunch of very tiny equal amounts. I did this on a big flat mirror with a razor blade. I had lots tiny doses at a time set to take every night. I would make new ones when I ran out. I put a dab of peanut butter on my finger and touched the dose. It stuck on it and I licked it off. Like a druggie lol. That is how I tapered off the tiny bits of trazodone. Marie.
  19. It's so good to hear from you @ShiningLight! And of course, you're right. I think, once you suffer a hard crash, you kind of get PTSD about ever going back there. At least that is the case for me. I'm going to look into a SinuPulse. I don't care for neti pots either. How are you coming along? I've missed visiting with you.
  20. marie123

    marie123: tapering trazodone

    Hello Shebon. I've noticed my hair is in much better condition since I was not able to go to the salon for four months. The strong dye that they use make your hair so dry and brittle. You know I never even knew there was actually a stain barrier that can be used for the face. I saw it on youtube when I was looking for solutions to my at home hair. My stylist has never used one. I felt a couple symptoms from the last cut. I just acknowledge what they are and say so what. With all the tapering I've done I know not to bother too much thinking about them. I can't wait to get into the 5's. If I look at it like that it's just 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 and done. It's my mind trick. Oh wow you are halfway there. You are going to make it for sure. Just go a little slower at the very end. Good luck. Marie.
  21. Shebon

    Shebon: intro and brief history

    Hi Everyone: Just an update to my current situation with tapering down from 3.75 mg. I have now reduced by 50% to 1.87 mg. mirt. I started the taper 1/1/20. So 6.5 months later, I have reached my first big milestone. Symptoms come and go but were worse at the start of the taper. I will hold at 1.87 for 1-2 months and then resume again with my modified CITA taper. The 1/8 piece of the 15 mg. tablet is quite small but I figure I can still cut a piece of that in half and start over with the 6 nites at 1.87 mg. mirt and 1 nite of .93 mg. mirt. Hold this for a month and then add 2 nites of .93 mg. mirt in, and so on down for another 6.5 months until I am at .93 mg. mirt. It is a SLOW process, but I think healing is happening as one tapers and that is a huge benefit. Cheers, Shevbon
  22. Deja, glad you're back! 😀 Sorry to hear you're in a wave, the anxiety is miserable. I have it too. I refer to the thought pattern above as "one wrong move." I do it all the time myself. It's catastrophizing. The story is that you've made one wrong move and it's ruined everything. This is not true. Everyone makes mistakes now and then, and we can recover from our mistakes. They're almost never as dire as they feel. The intensity you feel around this mistake is coming from the withdrawal emotions; it's not the reality of the situation. Incidentally, I recall making the flonase error myself some time ago. 🤔 Now I have a SinuPulse machine. I like it better than using a neti.
  23. xyz

    xyz: Lexapro, my intro

    very well, healed i think i need to go back on 0.2mg of valium and 0.2mg of lexapro. the obsessive thoughts are difficult
  24. Altostrata

    xyz: Lexapro, my intro

    I don't know. After you went off Lexapro, on 5/17/19, how did you feel?
  25. street129

    street129: hi

    7/12/20 HI frogie my friend I got my 1mg melatonin, I take .25mg of it each night, at 11pm one and a half hour before bed, OMG, my goodness I don't know if this is good or bad, cause within taken it, I be fighting to stay awake because it's not time for my trazodone 507mg, it's a struggle to be up for the pass 3 days after taking the .25mg melatonin. The melatonin that I find thats very, very good that don't gave me any effect is BY NATROL. I'm having a tender right ear, pain in the inter lope, FOR 4 DAYS straight, I don't thing this is WD, but I went urgent care, Dr. claim its red on the inside but not much of anything else, she did gave me the corona test which I didn't asked for, 3rd one by the way, I had the anti body test before also, all were negative. I was given ear drops for 7 days and was told to see ENT. I have hit one whole month today 7/12/20 on beginning of my taper that for 3 years feared beginning, so this is a big deal for me, frogie I appreciate you for letting me know I can do this and it's has a lot to do with YOU. I'm doing 2 more weeks at my first taper of trazodone 507mg, I'm pushing on, let's go. Hope you're doing good Enjoy the rest of the weekend Today it's crazy hot going up to 92 degrees
  26. My opinion is that Paxil is the standout, followed by Effexor and Cymbalta. Substitution of Prozac is standard operating procedure for all the SSRIs.
  27. Composter, how are you feeling now? Did you return to 5.8 as Chessie suggested? I made the opposite mistake in March and updosed by 2.5% for about 5 days. When I realized my mistake, I returned immediately to the proper dose with no issues. Hope the same for you. Let us know!
  28. It tended to hit me harder the lower I went also. But you are smart in holding through your move. It sounds like you are doing relatively well😊 Take care, Frogie xx
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