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  2. Altostrata

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    Exactly what drugs are you taking now, at what dosages and times of day? When did you start each drug? To help us out, follow these instructions Please put your drug and withdrawal history in your signature You may need to use a computer to do this.
  3. Yesterday
  4. bmi197143

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    Still have to get off the Ropinerole. Pill weight is .204 dosage is 25 mg am currently taking 0.030.
  5. bmi197143

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    Currently using a jewelry scale. And only real bad symtom so far is tinnitus is loud in left ear mild head ache. Using a Benzo to sleep as suggested.
  6. When did you make this change? What was your clonazepam schedule before Clonazepam 0.1 mg/daily 7am 0.25mg, 4pm 0.25mg, 10pm 0.5mg How was your IBS diagnosed? When was your high blood pressure last reviewed? I'm asking these questions because it probably would be best for you to taper off the drugs that you don't need any more. Has one doctor prescribed all these drugs? To help us out, follow these instructions Please put your drug and withdrawal history in your signature You may need to use a computer to do this.
  7. bmi197143

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    I did 0.017 for the last 12 days.
  8. It's a simple question. What makes you feel better? Or at least, what helps you stay strong when things are at their hardest? Do you journal? Meditate? Did you change your diet? Start knitting? Who's work speaks to you? For me, I started tracking my daily happiness on a scale of 1-100. I figured if I could get myself to an average of 51, then the scale would tip just enough in the positive direction to justify a life worth living. This was such a modest goal that I found that hitting 51 over the course of a week was possible even if I had multiple crap days that clocked in at like, 23. Having something so concrete kept me grounded even if I was feeling like an emotional tilt-a-whirl. I'd love to see what everyone is doing to self-soothe, and whether or not anyone has come up with any strategies that helped them get through their day to day. Get specific! Pontificate! We're all so strong to still be here, so share what's in that unflinching will.
  9. Altostrata

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    Are you taking 0.017mg in pill weight now? How are you measuring this? Have you had withdrawal symptoms while tapering?
  10. bmi197143

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    10mg dosage and 0.50 actual pill weight O sorry 0.050 is the actual pill weight.
  11. Altostrata

    bmi197143: Help trying to taper 2

    What is the dosage in milligrams? (Att @brassmonkey)
  12. This is the only topic in all caps anywhere on this site I hope the warning is clear.
  13. Altostrata

    NEVER SKIP DOSES TO TAPER

    We have seen many people come here with severe withdrawal symptoms after following their prescribers' or their own misguided plan to skip doses in order to taper. You may hear of people who got away with skipping doses to taper. That is possible, some people cold turkey without a problem. However, after cold turkey, skipping is perhaps the most risky way to come off psychiatric drugs. Both can result in terrible, severe withdrawal symptoms that might not fully be reversed by reinstatement of the drug. Skipping doses causes the level of the drug in your bloodstream to go up and down, even with long-acting drugs such as fluoxetine. This puts stress on your nervous system, potentially causing withdrawal symptoms. It's like playing ping-pong with your brain. NEVER SKIP DOSES TO TAPER. If after seeing this, you decide to skip doses to taper and get withdrawal symptoms, do not come back here asking for help. It is unaccountable why some doctors recommend skipping doses to taper. There is quite a large body of research showing that when people skip doses, they get withdrawal symptoms. Baldwin, D. S., Cooper, J. A., Huusom, A. K. T., & Hindmarch, I. (2006). A double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, flexible-dose study to evaluate the tolerability, efficacy and effects of treatment discontinuation with escitalopram and paroxetine in patients with major depressive disorder. International Clinical Psychopharmacology, 21(3), 159–169. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.yic.0000194377.88330.1d Bauer, R., Glenn, T., Alda, M., Sagduyu, K., Marsh, W., Grof, P., Munoz, R., Murray, G., Ritter, P., Lewitzka, U., Severus, E., Whybrow, P. C., & Bauer, M. (2013). Antidepressant dosage taken by patients with bipolar disorder: Factors associated with irregularity. International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 1. https://doi.org/10.1186/2194-7511-1-26 Bulloch, A. G. M., & Patten, S. B. (2010). Non-adherence with psychotropic medications in the general population. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 45(1), 47–56. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-009-0041-5 Dilsaver, S. C., & Greden, J. F. (1984). Antidepressant withdrawal phenomena. Biological Psychiatry, 19(2), 237–256. Drug Ther Perspect. (2001). Antidepressant discontinuation syndromes: Common, under-recognised and not always benign. Drugs & Therapy Perspectives, 17(20), 12–15. https://doi.org/10.2165/00042310-200117200-00004 Gallagher, J. C., Strzinek, R. A., Cheng, R. J., Ausmanas, M. K., Astl, D., & Seljan, P. (2012). The effect of dose titration and dose tapering on the tolerability of desvenlafaxine in women with vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. Journal of Women’s Health (2002), 21(2), 188–198. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.2764 Greden, J. F. (1993). Antidepressant maintenance medications: When to discontinue and how to stop. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 54 Suppl, 39–45; discussion 46-47. Haddad, P. M. (2001). Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndromes. Drug Safety, 24(3), 183–197. Henry, M. E., Moore, C. M., Kaufman, M. J., Michelson, D., Schmidt, M. E., Stoddard, E., Vuckevic, A. J., Berreira, P. J., Cohen, B. M., & Renshaw, P. F. (2000). Brain kinetics of paroxetine and fluoxetine on the third day of placebo substitution: A fluorine MRS study. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(9), 1506–1508. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.157.9.1506 Kaplan, E. M. (1997). Antidepressant noncompliance as a factor in the discontinuation syndrome. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 58 Suppl 7, 31–35; discussion 36. Meijer, W. E. E., Bouvy, M. L., Heerdink, E. R., Urquhart, J., & Leufkens, H. G. M. (2001). Spontaneous lapses in dosing during chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. British Journal of Psychiatry, 179(6), 519–522. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.179.6.519 Michelson, D., Fava, M., Amsterdam, J., Apter, J., Londborg, P., Tamura, R., & Tepner, R. G. (2000). Interruption of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The British Journal of Psychiatry: The Journal of Mental Science, 176, 363–368. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.176.4.363 Osterberg, L. G., Urquhart, J., & Blaschke, T. F. (2010). Understanding Forgiveness: Minding and Mining the Gaps Between Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutics. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 88(4), 457–459. https://doi.org/10.1038/clpt.2010.171 Rosenbaum, J. F., Fava, M., Hoog, S. L., Ascroft, R. C., & Krebs, W. B. (1998). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor discontinuation syndrome: A randomized clinical trial. Biological Psychiatry, 44(2), 77–87. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-3223(98)00126-7
  14. There is quite a large body of research showing that when people skip doses, they get withdrawal symptoms. Baldwin, D. S., Cooper, J. A., Huusom, A. K. T., & Hindmarch, I. (2006). A double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, flexible-dose study to evaluate the tolerability, efficacy and effects of treatment discontinuation with escitalopram and paroxetine in patients with major depressive disorder. International Clinical Psychopharmacology, 21(3), 159–169. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.yic.0000194377.88330.1d Bauer, R., Glenn, T., Alda, M., Sagduyu, K., Marsh, W., Grof, P., Munoz, R., Murray, G., Ritter, P., Lewitzka, U., Severus, E., Whybrow, P. C., & Bauer, M. (2013). Antidepressant dosage taken by patients with bipolar disorder: Factors associated with irregularity. International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 1. https://doi.org/10.1186/2194-7511-1-26 Bulloch, A. G. M., & Patten, S. B. (2010). Non-adherence with psychotropic medications in the general population. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 45(1), 47–56. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-009-0041-5 Dilsaver, S. C., & Greden, J. F. (1984). Antidepressant withdrawal phenomena. Biological Psychiatry, 19(2), 237–256. Drug Ther Perspect. (2001). Antidepressant discontinuation syndromes: Common, under-recognised and not always benign. Drugs & Therapy Perspectives, 17(20), 12–15. https://doi.org/10.2165/00042310-200117200-00004 Gallagher, J. C., Strzinek, R. A., Cheng, R. J., Ausmanas, M. K., Astl, D., & Seljan, P. (2012). The effect of dose titration and dose tapering on the tolerability of desvenlafaxine in women with vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. Journal of Women’s Health (2002), 21(2), 188–198. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.2764 Greden, J. F. (1993). Antidepressant maintenance medications: When to discontinue and how to stop. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 54 Suppl, 39–45; discussion 46-47. Haddad, P. M. (2001). Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndromes. Drug Safety, 24(3), 183–197. Henry, M. E., Moore, C. M., Kaufman, M. J., Michelson, D., Schmidt, M. E., Stoddard, E., Vuckevic, A. J., Berreira, P. J., Cohen, B. M., & Renshaw, P. F. (2000). Brain kinetics of paroxetine and fluoxetine on the third day of placebo substitution: A fluorine MRS study. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(9), 1506–1508. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.157.9.1506 Kaplan, E. M. (1997). Antidepressant noncompliance as a factor in the discontinuation syndrome. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 58 Suppl 7, 31–35; discussion 36. Meijer, W. E. E., Bouvy, M. L., Heerdink, E. R., Urquhart, J., & Leufkens, H. G. M. (2001). Spontaneous lapses in dosing during chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. British Journal of Psychiatry, 179(6), 519–522. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.179.6.519 Michelson, D., Fava, M., Amsterdam, J., Apter, J., Londborg, P., Tamura, R., & Tepner, R. G. (2000). Interruption of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The British Journal of Psychiatry: The Journal of Mental Science, 176, 363–368. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.176.4.363 Osterberg, L. G., Urquhart, J., & Blaschke, T. F. (2010). Understanding Forgiveness: Minding and Mining the Gaps Between Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutics. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 88(4), 457–459. https://doi.org/10.1038/clpt.2010.171 Rosenbaum, J. F., Fava, M., Hoog, S. L., Ascroft, R. C., & Krebs, W. B. (1998). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor discontinuation syndrome: A randomized clinical trial. Biological Psychiatry, 44(2), 77–87. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-3223(98)00126-7 We have seen many people come here with severe withdrawal symptoms after following their prescribers' or their own misguided plan to skip doses in order to taper. You may hear of people who got away with skipping doses to taper. That is possible, some people cold turkey without a problem. However, after cold turkey, skipping is perhaps the most risky way to come off psychiatric drugs. NEVER SKIP DOSES TO TAPER. If after seeing this, you decide to skip doses to taper and get withdrawal symptoms, do not come back here asking for help. I hope that answers your question.
  15. Altostrata

    How to find just about anything on this site

    To find the topics marked with a sun ( ☼), enter this in Google search: ☼ survivingantidepressants.org This will return all the ☼ topics. (☼ is the Unicode for this symbol. It does not work in site search.) The ☼ topics are people who have turned the corner and are on their roads to recovery.
  16. marie123

    marie123: tapering trazodone

    Hi Shebon. Yes, I've had various teeth hurting me during my three withdrawals and always told myself it's probably withdrawal. Some were.This tooth though was confirmed by a top endontist that I needed a filling. Believe me, I am glad it was just a filling. The meds have done some damage and caused real teeth issues for sure along with a former bad dentist. I had two teeth pulled last year and three root canals. One of them had a cracked root. I believe it happened because while I was taping trazodone, my jaw sometimes would just slam shut on it's own. Mirtazapine causes dry mouth, which causes cavities. My gums feel soft and mushy in some spots and I feel a sore here and there. It's Mirt's fault. It also gives me a sweet tooth. It has to go. I see that you're getting low on the Mirt. If you hit a wall as you get closer to the end, slow it down a lot so you just glide off. Good luck. Marie.
  17. Shebon

    marie123: tapering trazodone

    Hi Marie: At the beginning of my taper, I had a tooth that was sensitive to the touch, and hot and cold water. I went to see my dentist who thought I might need a root canal. I had the root canal scheduled for mid-April with an endontist. The tooth thing cleared up within 8 days and has not come back. I remember this during my benzo taper too -- teeth hurting. So I am glad I did not need a root canal.....I think the tooth issue was due to the tapering of mirt. Best regards, Shebon
  18. Hi Survivor. You've certainly had your setbacks, but it looks like you are improving. Just keep holding and you will be better. The good news is your only taking a low dose of trazodone. I had a reaction to the flu shot last year and it messed me up for a few weeks. Marie.
  19. Welcome to SA, Eirik. What dosage of escitalopram were you on and how fast did you taper? From the symptoms you describe, it sounds as if you are experiencing withdrawal due to a too-fast taper. What seems like a slow taper is very often too fast and what results is withdrawal. The lack of emotions and inability to feel happiness (anhedonia) are typical withdrawal symptoms. Doctors, who get their information from the pharmaceutical companies, don't believe in the existence of withdrawal. What is withdrawal syndrome. Daily Checklist of Antidepressant Withdrawal Symptoms (PDF) Brain Remodelling When we take psychiatric medications, the CNS (central nervous system) responds by making changes over the months and years we take the drug(s). When the medication is discontinued, the CNS has to undo all the changes it made. Rebuilding the neurotransmitter production and reactivating the receptor and transporter cells takes time -- during that rebuilding process symptoms occur. You will heal from this withdrawal, but unfortunately we can't predict how long it will take. I know it is a shock that these drugs can have this effect, but they do. Again, it is very common in withdrawal to not feel any happiness. Very slowly and very gradually your feelings will return. The damage is not permanent. We don't recommend a lot of supplements on SA, as many members report being sensitive to them due to our over-reactive nervous systems, but two supplements that we do recommend are magnesium and omega 3 (fish oil). Many people find these to be calming to the nervous system. Magnesium, nature's calcium channel blocker Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) Add in one at a time and at a low dose in case you do experience problems. This is your Introduction topic, where you can ask questions and connect with other members. We're glad you found your way here.
  20. Hi Ripley: Are you a fan of the "Aliens" movies? Ripley was the name of the main female hero character, Sigourney Weaver. Just in thought to your post above, did you add any supplements to your routine? Any of the B vitamins can be stimulating; chocolate and caffeine at nite same, and and an all carb dinner is not good. Protein is your friend during the taper. I drink a soothing Good Earth tea around 7:30-8 p.m. with chamomile and other good stuff. It is really helping to calm things down before bedtime. Some nites, I add 1/2 tablet of Unisom and that seems to do the trick. My sleep was better at the start of my taper but recently, I have at least (3) wakeups during the nite but get back to sleep. The nitemares of Mirt are something else too. I hope you can go forward without too many problems as I know sleep is what we fear that we will loose. If I have a "not so good" nite, I know that the next nite will be much better. Hang in there....things will start to even out and your body will get used to the lower dosage. At the start of my taper, I had headaches and a tooth that I thought would need a root canal -- NOT SO. Now, things have calmed down a lot and going forward is helping things. I firmly believe that we will have healing during the taper and when we are done with the taper, things will be much improved. Best regards, Shebon
  21. I have a genuine question about the science of withdrawing from these drugs...why is it not smart to withdraw from them by skipping days between doses. Here is what I mean: I started out at 300 mg XL and after 18 months my doctor said to taper off to 200 mg. After 2 weeks I felt okay, but he wanted to be safe so said wait another two weeks before going down in dose. I found that after one day of missing a dose I felt no side effects....then another day....no side effects. Why would it not be smart to taper by saying taking the 200 mg and then skipping the next two days? At this point I actually find I feel worse every time I take the Wellbutrin and reintroduce it to my system. Just curious. Please educate me. 300 mg Wellbutrin XL (5/4/2020) 200 mg Wellbutrin XL (5/18/2020)
  22. My guess is your symptoms arise from benzodiazepine withdrawal when you were taken off clonazepam in early January. You may have had an adverse reaction to trazodone and a withdrawal reaction to being taken off Lyrica as well. That would make sense I do know the addition of the trazadone made me very sick it was only very shortly afterwards that I stopped being able to eat and the constant migraine headache, sweats, chills, ear pain, nausea and constant diarrhea I definitely agree I had a very bad withdrawal reaction to being taken off the lyrica so quickly. It was when I started experiencing for the very first time the instant all day continuous muscle cramping and releasing over and over again all day and the very first time having the continuous numbing of my body from my waist down it would flush through then release then flush through continously all day to, also when the burning searing excruciating headache/migraine, tinnitus, hot sweats This continued throughout even my tapers and up until a few weeks ago but the numbness, burning has ended up going everywhere in my body but in the last few weeks it has not been more in my lower body and arms. 3333333333333333333333333The last few weeks though as I mentioned before the uncontrollable muscle cramping has changed to the constant muscle cramping of the upper body/arms/head/neck/face. You were taking .2mg clonazepam/day at the time? Now you are taking 0.1mg/day. It seems you feel better when you add the benzo-like zopiclone because it augments the inadequate amount of clonazepam you're taking. 2 mg/2xday clonazepam before it was switched to 0.5mg Lorazepam/2xday then shortly after stopped once the lyrica was started. Yes you could be right. I just thought whatever is in the zopiclone must be giving my brain what it feels deprived of to function again since the lyrica, trazadone and escitalopram have been taken away. Or I had thought maybe I am experiencing daily zopiclone withdrawals ontop of my other withdrawals and that after I take the zopiclone the zopiclone withdrawals get relieved, just a thought I had. Why are you taking 0.25mg clonazepam at 4 p.m.? I thought I would spread it out during the day instead of just morning and evening because my withdrawals start to feel so much more unbearable at that time and I need the relief.
  23. Scary. Sorry you are going thru this as well. What is your drug usage background? Were you "recovered" before the Tylenol? My theory is that if you are in any way unstable from any drug discontinuance, you may likely suffer reactions to "regular" drugs. I was unstable from taking steroids; antibiotics and now Tylenol have dramatically worsened my situation. There is no doubt that Tylenol caused this worsening. I hope that when I do stabilize (who knows when), I will be able take these drugs again. To give you some hope, I get the occasional window now - 5 months after Tylenol. Considering I was not in a good place even before the Tylenol, this is a good sign. I used to have mornings so toxic, it was unbearable, now I wakeup "only" with a racing heart and fatigue. I have also connected with someone who had a similar reaction to Aspirin, and she too recovered from it. This may take a while to get over, but you will get out of it.
  24. Gridley

    Gizmo: Planning my taper

    Welcome to SA, Gizmo. With all the drugs they've put you on, it's impossible to untangle what's causing what, but your symptoms sound like withdrawal from some or all the drugs you've been on. What is withdrawal syndrome. Daily Checklist of Antidepressant Withdrawal Symptoms (PDF) Brain Remodelling When we take psychiatric medications, the CNS (central nervous system) responds by making changes over the months and years we take the drug(s). When the medication is discontinued, the CNS has to undo all the changes it made. Rebuilding the neurotransmitter production and reactivating the receptor and transporter cells takes time -- during that rebuilding process symptoms occur. You will heal from this withdrawal, but unfortunately we can't predict how long it will take. To get to the matter at hand, your Cymbalta taper, you need to be aware that the vast majority of psychiatrists know nothing about withdrawal (they don't believe it exists) or safe tapering and invariably try to taper their patients too fast. We recommend tapering by no more than 10% of your current dose every 4 weeks. Why taper by 10% of my dosage? The following link is specifically about tapering Cymbalta. Does your Cymbalta capsule contain hundred of tiny beads or 4 to 12 little tabs? For both versions, this link explains how to get the nonstandard doses you'll need for your 10% taper. Tips for tapering off Cymbalta (duloxetine) We don't recommend a lot of supplements on SA, as many members report being sensitive to them due to our over-reactive nervous systems, but two supplements that we do recommend are magnesium and omega 3 (fish oil). Many people find these to be calming to the nervous system. Magnesium, nature's calcium channel blocker Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) Add in one at a time and at a low dose in case you do experience problems. This is your Introduction topic, where you can ask questions and connect with other members. We're glad you found your way here.
  25. On 6/2/2020 at 4:15 PM, TracyH said: Lyrica 100mg/day was started on Dec. 29 for anxiety. Clonazepam was switched afterwards to Lorazepam .5 mg twice a day then shortly after discontinued. I did feel drugged on the lyrica though and the right side off my face drooped. I actually can not say for sure now that after the trazadone was when I first I started to experience muscle pain throughout different areas of my body. My mind was muddled from feeling drugged but it was after the Lorazepam was discontinued the trazadone was started shortly afterwards so it gets confusing to know I will look back to at my journaling that I managed to do to see do to see if I can pinpoint it better.
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