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  1. Dear all, I have done all the research possible and contact all persons in the Netherlands who could help me find the answers for coping with this rollercoaster ride of tapering my last 2,5 mg of paroxetine (paxil). I managed to get in touch with a researcher in the area of tapering and withdrawal effects of anti-depressants. He was really helpful with my questions about tapering of and was so kind to share his latest upcoming publication about withdrawal effects and the importance of good guidance from our doctors. I found this article very inspirational and heart warming to know we are not alone in this battle of coming of our medications. I wanted to share this with you, thought it could be helpfull for others as well. Here is the link to the manuscript. It is still under review but already publiced at https://iipdw.org/user-knowledge-psychotropic-drug-withdrawal/ greetings Julia
  2. Empirical evidence about recovery and mental health | BMC Psychiatry | Full Text I haven't completed reading this. It's a long article: 8568 words = ±18 pages = ±40mins reading time. But much shorter than a book. It appears to be quite an excellent summary / response to the status quo and accepted narratives, with a solid social grounding. The focus is largely schizophrenia, but it applies generally to other states. While many seasoned members here may know the content of the article all too well, it's a good refresher at the very least. At best I've already found a few nuggets which - when put together - joined some dots (aka neurons) in my head that needed joining. My target audience for sharing this (apart from here) would be the occasional "psychiatric footsoldier" - members of the public who have read the marketing hype, and can be quite coercive and destabilising. I think this article could potentially turn them into allies Authors: Professor Mike Slade Mike Slade (0000-0001-7020-3434) - ORCID | Connecting Research and Researchers You searched for mike slade - Mad In America Amazon.com: Mike Slade: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, Kindle Dr Eleanor Longden Eleanor Longden, PhD, Author at Mad In America Amazon.com: Eleanor Longden: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, Kindle Abstract Background Two discourses exist in mental health research and practice. The first focuses on the limitations associated with disability arising from mental disorder. The second focuses on the possibilities for living well with mental health problems. Discussion This article was prompted by a review to inform disability policy. We identify seven findings from this review: recovery is best judged by experts or using standardised assessment; few people with mental health problems recover; if a person no longer meets criteria for a mental illness, they are in remission; diagnosis is a robust basis for characterising groups and predicting need; treatment and other supports are important factors for improving outcome; the barriers to receiving effective treatment are availability, financing and client awareness; and the impact of mental illness, in particular schizophrenia, is entirely negative. We selectively review a wider range of evidence which challenge these findings, including the changing understanding of recovery, national mental health policies, systematic review methodology and undertainty, epidemiological evidence about recovery rates, reasoning biased due to assumptions about mental illness being an illness like any other, the contested nature of schizophrenia, the social construction of diagnoses, alternative explanations for psychosis experiences including the role of trauma, diagnostic over-shadowing, stigma, the technological paradigm, the treatment gap, social determinants of mental ill-health, the prevalence of voice-hearing in the general population, and the sometimes positive impact of psychosis experience in relation to perspective and purpose. Conclusion We propose an alternative seven messages which are both empirically defensible and more helpful to mental health stakeholders: Recovery is best judged by the person living with the experience; Many people with mental health problems recover; If a person no longer meets criteria for a mental illness, they are not ill; Diagnosis is not a robust foundation; Treatment is one route among many to recovery; Some people choose not to use mental health services; and the impact of mental health problems is mixed. Full Text Versions Empirical evidence about recovery and mental health | BMC Psychiatry | Full Text Empirical evidence about recovery and mental health (PubMed version) The empirical evidence about mental health and recovery: How likely, how long, what helps? (PDF Download Available)
  3. danny

    danny

    I started Paxil in 2009 due to severe panic attacks which caused me to drop out of college twice. I was wary of medication and pushed it off as long as I could, but I was really at my wits end and relented. For about the first month & a half to two months on Paxil I felt very good, almost euphoric. Slowly after those initial months, as I look back on it now, Paxil started to eat away at the core of me. Access to true emotions started to get harder and harder, sleep was less deeper dreamless even, sexual desire slowly became little to none, my mind became hazy and foggy. My mind was in such a haze that I completely forgot what it was like to be normal, to have complete clear cognitive function. I was not even aware of the entire affect Paxil was having on me. I started to taper off in the summer of 2011. Insomnia was the biggest reason. I had an inkling Paxil could be the cause and was willing to try anything to sleep again. I suffered excruciating withdrawals, brain zaps, IBS like my insides were being turned inside out, headaches like none other, and nausea. This lasted for about a month & a half then the withdrawals started to lessen. I know I should have consulted w my psych about wanting to get off Paxil. But he himself I'm pretty sure was taking the same meds he was prescribing. He was absolutely flat emotionally and I got the feeling he literally lacked the emotional capacity to care. I hope you can understand why I was reticent. After a yr off of Paxil I was still having the same side effects I had while on the drug. I had no idea it could still effect me. I was looking at any alternatives, was it my diet, was it emotional trauma (my parents got divorced in 2010) just anything other than Paxil, I mean I got off them right? There is no way they can STILL be affecting me?. Finally in 2013, the summer after my graduation I did a little research, maybe Paxil could still affect me? I found Paxil progress and a couple other sites that answered that question in the affirmative. So here I am today in 2015 feeling a lot better than I once did a few yrs ago. I still get side effects from time to time burping, bad gas, IBS, nasal drip, haze and some others. My counselor still thinks I need meds and won't believe paxil was the cause of my depression. It feels good to share this w ppl who understand.
  4. Just wondering on people's thoughts on this? The heaviness and dread and unable to move and despair I've certainly had in years on and off meds but I also suffered in childhood from a lot of crying spells and dread feelings but I never found the root cause and now I've thrown into the mix stupid medication. I've tried counselling, CBT, change of diet, eft and doesn't seem like much shifts it..it feels like there could be hundreds of causes but until the root is found anything else doesn't touch it. What has others experiences been? Did you find the root cause and how on earth did you find it? I feel like I need a list of all possible causes so I can test and go through them..I've had tests for thyroid done btw. Thank you.
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