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Junglechicken

☼ Junglechicken

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Junglechicken
2 minutes ago, Frogie said:

JC:

 

I had a hysterectomy back in 1997. After that, I get pains in my right side. I ALWAYS think it's my appendix. I've had ultrasounds and a CT scan (for something else) and blood work. Everything comes back fine. I have scar tissue. I know how you feel. HA stinks, I have it. But, you just had it checked out didn't you and it was ok? Take a deep breath everything will be fine. It's probably those pants like you said.

 

Let me know.

 

Take care,

Frogie xx

 

Hey Frogie,

 

Thanks for stopping by my friend.

 

I'm waiting for an MD to call me back re: symptoms.

 

The NHS 111 number is for people who can't get an appt with their doctor soon enough, and also relieves the burden on the healthcare system (over-worked GPs).

 

Hope you guys are right.

 

TC,

JC xxx

 

 

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apace41

JC,

 

This is from the website "anxietycentre.com" regarding the burning sensation:

 

See if this resonates for you (with the hope that I didn't violate too many copyright laws).  :ph34r:

 

My working theory is that withdrawal triggers the CNS hyperstimulation referred to in the below.

 

Best,

 

Andy

The Symptom:

  • It feels as though your body is experiencing a burning sensation inside the body. The sensation can be localized in one spot, many spots, or throughout the entire body.
  • The burning sensation can be stationary in one location always, may move from one location to another, or constantly change and shift from one or many locations to another or many other locations.
  • This symptom can also seem like it is radiating from inside to the outside of the body.
  • This symptom is often described as a burning, tingling, vibrating/tremor, uneasiness, tightness, queasiness, or crawly feeling inside the body.
  • This symptom can also feel like a “cold” or “freezing” sensation.

This symptom can come and go rarely, occur frequently, or persist indefinitely. For example, you may feel this symptom once in a while and not that often, feel it off and on, or feel it all the time.

This symptom may precede, accompany, or follow an escalation of other anxiety sensations and symptoms, or occur by itself.

This symptom can precede, accompany, or follow an episode of nervousness, anxiety, fear, and elevated stress, or occur ‘out of the blue’ and for no apparent reason.

This symptom can range in intensity from slight, to moderate, to severe. It can also come in waves, where it’s strong one moment and eases off the next.

This symptom can change from day to day, and/or from moment to moment.

All of the above combinations and variations are common.

These types of symptoms can seem more disconcerting when undistracted, resting, doing deep relaxation, or when trying to go to sleep or when waking up from sleep.

The Reason:

Medical Advisory
Because many medical conditions can cause anxiety-like sensations and symptoms, including this one, we recommend all new, changing, persistent, and returning sensations and symptoms be discussed with your doctor. If your doctor concludes that your sensations and symptoms are solely stress related, including anxiety-caused stress, you can be confident there isn't a medical cause for this sensation or symptom. Generally, most doctors can easily determine the difference between stress- and anxiety-caused sensations and symptoms from those caused by medical conditions.

 

Doctors aren’t infallible, however. If you are uncertain about your doctor’s diagnosis, you may want to seek a second or more opinions. But if all opinions concur, you can be assured that stress, including anxiety-caused stress, is the cause of this sensation or symptom. Therefore, you can confidently rule out a medical cause.

When this symptom is caused anxiety, being stressed and anxious (worried, apprehensive, fretful, fearful) causes the body to produce the stress response.[1] The stress response secretes stress hormones into the bloodstream where they travel to targeted spots in the body to bring about specific physiological, psychological, and emotional changes that enhance the body’s ability to deal with a threat—to either fight with or flee from it—which is the reason the stress response is often referred to as the fight or flight response.

When stress responses occur infrequently, the body can recover relatively quickly from the physiological, psychological, and emotional changes the stress response brings about. But when stress responses occur too frequently and/or dramatically the body has a more difficult time recovering, which can result in the body remaining in state of semi stress response readiness, which we call stress-response hyperstimulation, since stress hormones are stimulants.[2] A body that becomes hyperstimulated can behave oddly and erratically, which can be particularly noticeable because of how hyperstimulation affects the body’s nervous system.[3][4]

The body’s nervous system is responsible for sending and receiving sensory information to and from the brain. A main component of the nervous system is specialized cells called neurons (nerve cells), which communicate with each other using an electrochemical process (the combination of electricity and chemistry).

For example, when nerve impulse information is received from one of the body’s senses, neurons relay this nerve impulse information through the nervous system network to the brain for interpretation. And if we want to move a particular muscle or group of muscles, nerve impulse information is sent from the brain through the nervous system network to the particular muscle or groups of muscles to bring about movement (muscles move through a combination of nerve impulse-triggered muscle contractions and releases). Again, this nerve impulse information is conveyed electrochemically by the neurons through the nervous system network.

This system of communication and reaction works normally when the body and nervous system are healthy. Problems can occur, however, when the body and nervous system become stress hormone hyperstimulated.[4][5][6]

For example, because of their electrochemical properties, neurons are particularly sensitive to stress hormone stimulation. When they become hyperstimulated, they can act erratically and more involuntarily than normal, which can cause them to “misreport,” “over report,” and send “false” nerve impulse information to and from the brain. These abnormalities can cause a wide range of sensory and physical anomalies, such as those associated with this symptom.

And because hyperstimulation can cause the electrical activity in the brain to increase, which can cause neurons to become even more unstable, neurons can fire even more erratically and involuntarily when the body, brain, and nervous system become hyperstimulated.

The combination of the above factors can cause a wide range of odd and bizarre behaviors, sensations, and feelings. Experiencing a ‘burning sensation’ in and throughout the body is an example of some of the odd sensations and feelings that can occur as a result of these factors.

Even though this symptom can seem odd and even uncomfortable, stress- and anxiety-caused burning sensations are harmless, and therefore, needn’t be a cause for concern. It, too, will disappear when the body’s hyperstimulated state has been eliminated.

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Junglechicken
5 minutes ago, apace41 said:

JC,

 

This is from the website "anxietycentre.com" regarding the burning sensation:

 

See if this resonates for you (with the hope that I didn't violate too many copyright laws).  :ph34r:

 

My working theory is that withdrawal triggers the CNS hyperstimulation referred to in the below.

 

Best,

 

Andy

The Symptom:

  • It feels as though your body is experiencing a burning sensation inside the body. The sensation can be localized in one spot, many spots, or throughout the entire body.
  • The burning sensation can be stationary in one location always, may move from one location to another, or constantly change and shift from one or many locations to another or many other locations.
  • This symptom can also seem like it is radiating from inside to the outside of the body.
  • This symptom is often described as a burning, tingling, vibrating/tremor, uneasiness, tightness, queasiness, or crawly feeling inside the body.
  • This symptom can also feel like a “cold” or “freezing” sensation.

This symptom can come and go rarely, occur frequently, or persist indefinitely. For example, you may feel this symptom once in a while and not that often, feel it off and on, or feel it all the time.

This symptom may precede, accompany, or follow an escalation of other anxiety sensations and symptoms, or occur by itself.

This symptom can precede, accompany, or follow an episode of nervousness, anxiety, fear, and elevated stress, or occur ‘out of the blue’ and for no apparent reason.

This symptom can range in intensity from slight, to moderate, to severe. It can also come in waves, where it’s strong one moment and eases off the next.

This symptom can change from day to day, and/or from moment to moment.

All of the above combinations and variations are common.

These types of symptoms can seem more disconcerting when undistracted, resting, doing deep relaxation, or when trying to go to sleep or when waking up from sleep.

The Reason:

Medical Advisory
Because many medical conditions can cause anxiety-like sensations and symptoms, including this one, we recommend all new, changing, persistent, and returning sensations and symptoms be discussed with your doctor. If your doctor concludes that your sensations and symptoms are solely stress related, including anxiety-caused stress, you can be confident there isn't a medical cause for this sensation or symptom. Generally, most doctors can easily determine the difference between stress- and anxiety-caused sensations and symptoms from those caused by medical conditions.

 

Doctors aren’t infallible, however. If you are uncertain about your doctor’s diagnosis, you may want to seek a second or more opinions. But if all opinions concur, you can be assured that stress, including anxiety-caused stress, is the cause of this sensation or symptom. Therefore, you can confidently rule out a medical cause.

When this symptom is caused anxiety, being stressed and anxious (worried, apprehensive, fretful, fearful) causes the body to produce the stress response.[1] The stress response secretes stress hormones into the bloodstream where they travel to targeted spots in the body to bring about specific physiological, psychological, and emotional changes that enhance the body’s ability to deal with a threat—to either fight with or flee from it—which is the reason the stress response is often referred to as the fight or flight response.

When stress responses occur infrequently, the body can recover relatively quickly from the physiological, psychological, and emotional changes the stress response brings about. But when stress responses occur too frequently and/or dramatically the body has a more difficult time recovering, which can result in the body remaining in state of semi stress response readiness, which we call stress-response hyperstimulation, since stress hormones are stimulants.[2] A body that becomes hyperstimulated can behave oddly and erratically, which can be particularly noticeable because of how hyperstimulation affects the body’s nervous system.[3][4]

The body’s nervous system is responsible for sending and receiving sensory information to and from the brain. A main component of the nervous system is specialized cells called neurons (nerve cells), which communicate with each other using an electrochemical process (the combination of electricity and chemistry).

For example, when nerve impulse information is received from one of the body’s senses, neurons relay this nerve impulse information through the nervous system network to the brain for interpretation. And if we want to move a particular muscle or group of muscles, nerve impulse information is sent from the brain through the nervous system network to the particular muscle or groups of muscles to bring about movement (muscles move through a combination of nerve impulse-triggered muscle contractions and releases). Again, this nerve impulse information is conveyed electrochemically by the neurons through the nervous system network.

This system of communication and reaction works normally when the body and nervous system are healthy. Problems can occur, however, when the body and nervous system become stress hormone hyperstimulated.[4][5][6]

For example, because of their electrochemical properties, neurons are particularly sensitive to stress hormone stimulation. When they become hyperstimulated, they can act erratically and more involuntarily than normal, which can cause them to “misreport,” “over report,” and send “false” nerve impulse information to and from the brain. These abnormalities can cause a wide range of sensory and physical anomalies, such as those associated with this symptom.

And because hyperstimulation can cause the electrical activity in the brain to increase, which can cause neurons to become even more unstable, neurons can fire even more erratically and involuntarily when the body, brain, and nervous system become hyperstimulated.

The combination of the above factors can cause a wide range of odd and bizarre behaviors, sensations, and feelings. Experiencing a ‘burning sensation’ in and throughout the body is an example of some of the odd sensations and feelings that can occur as a result of these factors.

Even though this symptom can seem odd and even uncomfortable, stress- and anxiety-caused burning sensations are harmless, and therefore, needn’t be a cause for concern. It, too, will disappear when the body’s hyperstimulated state has been eliminated.

 

YES! It totally does Andy - thank you :0)

 

Have you got a reference for where this extract came from?

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Junglechicken

Duh! Have seen that website....

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Junglechicken

The annoying thing is, no matter how much exercise I take, I cannot reduce the level of stress hormones enough.

 

Although the job is going well, my body is taking a big hit.

 

Also, those burning pains were  triggered when I had off-site meetings/presentations to do AND driving to places I wasn't familiar with (without SatNav)!

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apace41

So, given that knowledge, and the fact that burning is a very common sensation of a nervous system under stress, do you feel more optimistic that what is going on is not "sinister" in nature?

 

If you do, that's the first step in overcoming the HA beast.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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apace41
Just now, Junglechicken said:

The annoying thing is, no matter how much exercise I take, I cannot reduce the level of stress hormones enough.

 

What makes you think that exercise is the best approach to this?  Exercise significantly stresses the body.  It is "healthy" under the right circumstances, but if the body is already under stress exercise can just fuel the fire.

 

It might be best to limit exercise for the time being to long walks and some yoga or the like.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Junglechicken
Just now, apace41 said:

So, given that knowledge, and the fact that burning is a very common sensation of a nervous system under stress, do you feel more optimistic that what is going on is not "sinister" in nature?

 

If you do, that's the first step in overcoming the HA beast.

 

Best,

 

Andy

 

YES, I do Andy.

 

Those symptoms aren't really surprising then, as I have "hit the ground running" with this job.

 

Best,

JC

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Junglechicken
Just now, apace41 said:

 

What makes you think that exercise is the best approach to this?  Exercise significantly stresses the body.  It is "healthy" under the right circumstances, but if the body is already under stress exercise can just fuel the fire.

 

It might be best to limit exercise for the time being to long walks and some yoga or the like.

 

Best,

 

Andy

 

I'm only walking to and from the station each day (total of 7k).

 

Nothing high intensity.

 

Best,

JC

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apace41
1 minute ago, Junglechicken said:

Those symptoms aren't really surprising then, as I have "hit the ground running" with this job.

 

EXACTLY.  And, if the way you are going about "helping yourself" is through intense exercise, you may well be compounding the problem albeit with the best of intentions.

 

Best,

 

Andy

 

Edited per the below post

Edited by apace41
Reference to later post

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apace41
Just now, Junglechicken said:

 

I'm only walking to and from the station each day (total of 7k).

 

Nothing high intensity.

 

Best,

JC

 

 

OK.   Got it.  It's still not surprising that the stress hormones are not relieved from that.  On the way in any relief would be offset by the apprehension of another work day.

 

On the way home, you might feel some relief but you are likely exhausted by then so the walk is stressful because you are already very tired.

 

This will all work itself out -- it just takes time.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Junglechicken

I really HATE "the HA beast".

 

Trying to tell it "where to go". To leave me alone.

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Junglechicken
2 minutes ago, apace41 said:

 

 

OK.   Got it.  It's still not surprising that the stress hormones are not relieved from that.  On the way in any relief would be offset by the apprehension of another work day.

 

On the way home, you might feel some relief but you are likely exhausted by then so the walk is stressful because you are already very tired.

 

This will all work itself out -- it just takes time.

 

Best,

 

Andy

 

I've been doing CBT for about 8 weeks now, and STILL don't have my "chimp brain" under control.

 

Great!

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apace41
1 minute ago, Junglechicken said:

 

I've been doing CBT for about 8 weeks now, and STILL don't have my "chimp brain" under control.

 

Great!

 

With all due respect, JC, how long have you had these thought patterns?  Is it realistic to think that you can "rewire" your brain in 8 weeks?  

 

I've been working at it a long time and the neuroplastic change that occurs is slow and painful but it happens.  Anxious personalities are usually very impatient -- I know I am!

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Junglechicken
5 minutes ago, apace41 said:

 

With all due respect, JC, how long have you had these thought patterns?  Is it realistic to think that you can "rewire" your brain in 8 weeks?  

 

I've been working at it a long time and the neuroplastic change that occurs is slow and painful but it happens.  Anxious personalities are usually very impatient -- I know I am!

 

Best,

 

Andy

 

I've had these thought patterns for a VERY long time Andy.

 

Guess it's like losing weight....takes the equivalent amount of time to lose the weight gained / become "sane" again.  I'm doing BOTH, lol!

 

Yes, I'm impatient! When it comes to this nonsense anyway.

 

Best,

JC

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Junglechicken

Going to read your Anxietycentre.com extract again!

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Junglechicken

The pain has vanished.

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apace41
Just now, Junglechicken said:

The pain has vanished.

 

That should tell you something.

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Junglechicken

The GP hasn't ring yet and it's bed time (10:30pm UK time).  Burning sensation still intense in a smaller area this time 🛌

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Junglechicken

NHS 111 GP said it was anxiety related Andy.  You were right 👍

 

She said it was good I was seeing my GP this wk for a physical exam just as a precaution.

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apace41
8 hours ago, Junglechicken said:

NHS 111 GP said it was anxiety related Andy.  You were right 👍

 

As the saying goes, even a broken clock is  right twice a day.

 

Glad you got confirmation and comfort.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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WackoSirJacko
1 hour ago, apace41 said:

 

As the saying goes, even a broken clock is  right twice a day.

 

Glad you got confirmation and comfort.

 

Best,

 

Andy

Hi Andy,

 

I'm experiencing this hypersensitivity anxiety at the moment. Was pretty good at shifting it last year with CBT and a good mantra of 'I'm not scared, screw you'. This year on a lower dose it feels far more sensitive and like burning. Red hot poker in the heart, electrified brain etc

 

Interested in techniques you've used? Daily meditation? Mantras? Breathing? 

 

Many Thanks

 

Wacko

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Junglechicken

Work highly stressful ATM.

 

As to be expected.

 

"Faking it till I make it" couldn't be more true for me right now.

 

Walked back home in the dark (3k) as a meeting ran on, so I missed my usual train.

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apace41
3 hours ago, WackoSirJacko said:

Interested in techniques you've used? Daily meditation? Mantras? Breathing? 

 

All of those are good ideas, WSJ.  I've tried them all.  Some help at some times and there are times where nothing seems to help.

 

My list:

 

  • Meditation
  • Heart Rate Variability training
  • Journaling
  • Breathwork
  • Gratitude
  • Yoga
  • Coloring books
  • Nature Walks

There are others but this is the "off the top of my head" list.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Junglechicken

Forgot to mention, my manager is leaving in January, as his previous company has "made him an offer he can't refuse".

 

I think his replacement will do a good job though.

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Junglechicken

Therapist reckons burning pain is IBS triggered by sitting in a car wearing tight pants, stressed out.

 

She said it's very common.

 

She also said that most people are stoic/resilient and don't see a doc unless they are Keeling over.

 

Therefore my HA is very narcissistic.

 

 

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Junglechicken

Work highly stressful, workload increasing by the bucket load.

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apace41
2 minutes ago, Junglechicken said:

Therefore my HA is very narcissistic.

 

It would be if it weren't beyond your control at this point.  You are doing the CBT to rewire but you (she) can't blame yourself for neural networks that have gone astray.

 

The old "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" concept is (or should be) dead and buried.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Junglechicken
1 minute ago, apace41 said:

 

It would be if it weren't beyond your control at this point.  You are doing the CBT to rewire but you (she) can't blame yourself for neural networks that have gone astray.

 

The old "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" concept is (or should be) dead and buried.

 

Best,

 

Andy

 

Andy,

 

That's how I was brought up "put up and shut up".

 

I wonder if she is using reverse psychology?

 

The gut pains are awful ;0(

 

Best,

JC

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Junglechicken

The bad news is my body is in a pretty bad way since starting working again a month ago.

 

Now have pain (which came out of nowhere this afternoon under my left armpit??).  Have no idea what it is.

 

And on Wednesday, my therapist suggested very likely that burning pain lower right side of abdomen is IBS.

 

Pains are popping up all over the place ☹️

 

Cancelled GP appointment for tomorrow because of the IBS (thought I should "brick it").

 

The good news is that my manager (soon to be ex-manager) said that I'm doing  "better than good" on the performance front, achieving objectives.

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brassmonkey

There is a nerve center just below the left arm pit that can become very tender if a person is having abdominal problems.  It's probably just a symptom of the other problems you're having.

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Junglechicken
2 hours ago, brassmonkey said:

There is a nerve center just below the left arm pit that can become very tender if a person is having abdominal problems.  It's probably just a symptom of the other problems you're having.

 

Thank you Brass, that makes sense.

 

My gut functioning is "up the creek" these days.  Pain everywhere ☹️

 

You and Andy are fountains of knowledge.

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Junglechicken

Severe IBS this evening 😒 

 

Also have an eczema flare-up on my neck 😒 being hit with inflammation.  Could feel it coming up.

 

Have had to do a lot of driving over the weekend which I find very stressful.

 

Have to give a presentation / run a workshop tomorrow morning.

 

Meetings etc., in the afternoon.

 

Stress really sucks.

 

 

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