Jump to content
Razzle

Exercise ... Do more, do less, do nothing? What worked for you?

Recommended Posts

Maybe

This is still one of my worst "symptoms", the inability to do sports. Doing too much (sometimes just walking for 20 mins is too much) will give days of feeling terrible. As if poison would flow through my veins, hard to describe. I just hope this will stop some day...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shanti

It's aweful, I know! I used to hike and I was thin most my life. But with this and the antipsychotics I've gained at least 40 lbs. It is also making my pain so much worse that I can't get any muscle tone. I need to get some exercise but I just can't. I rode the bike for only 1 1/2 blocks yesterday and the nerves in my left leg are on fire. Crazy. So I guess I'll just try the Senior chair exercises and back yoga. It's better than nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dani

Just wanted to note about exercise:

 

Exercise can increase the release of cortisol, the stress and alerting hormone. Exertion may well make you feel lousy.

 

Walking is the form of exercise that least causes increases in cortisol. But if you do it strenuously and in the evening, you may well wake yourself up with some alerting hormone.

 

So don't overdo it, especially in the evening.

 

So should we only walk in the mornings? I'm asking because my therapist said walking can help calm down my anxiety...especially for 30 minutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jemima

So should we only walk in the mornings? I'm asking because my therapist said walking can help calm down my anxiety...especially for 30 minutes.

 

I find that taking things easy in both the morning and middle to late evening works best for me. I usually read for a bit after I get up, fix a late breakfast, and then get going on errands and projects. (I'm retired and can pretty much do things when I feel like it, so this may not fit your schedule.)

 

Overdoing during withdrawal definitely brings on the symptoms, in my experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dani

I wanted to do 30 minutes of walking daily, but I'm not sure if 30 minutes is just too much. I better start with 7-10 minutes and gradually increase.

 

Thanks :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

Hi All....

 

Yesterday I wanted to get some sun and go into the water. I am so glad I did. I have some nice color and I did lots of water aerobics while chatting away with neighbors in our pool.

 

It always does a lot to boost my state of mind. I should do it again today B)

 

On Saturday mornings I attend an Al-Anon Meeting at 9AM under the Juno Beach Pier. It is the most relaxing thing and I do love Al-Anon meetings and the friends I have in the Fellowship. We have Brunch afterwards.

 

http://www.facebook.com/JunoBeachLife?sk=wall&filter=1

 

It really is this pretty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barbarannamated

Nikki.... you're makin' me jealous!! It is beautiful! I love the southeast coast and Caribbean. It's great that you have a community pool as well as beach. Summer here means people hibernate indoors because it gets so hot. I've rented a place closer to the beach a few summers.

I walked around a music festival in 100° weather last weekend after no activity for months. Woke up in full body pain the next morning but was able to get past it and return for another day of heat, slow walking, some sitting. My feet were screaming both days and I was barefoot by the end, but I think my suffering was in proportion to my lack of activity recently. It wasn't aerobic activity as I think you are referring to. Trying to gauge how outa shape I am but this was probably not a fair measure. I've never been athletic or able to build muscle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shanti

Yes, start out 7-10 minutes and work up. I think 30 minutes to start out is too much. Better to go slow.

 

I'm doing pretty good with every other day and only 2 blocks. I believe I'll be able to increase it slowly. No flare ups :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alexjuice

I try to walk. I'm at a point where I can walk for a while but I really do best when I hit my sweet spot, not too fast or slow.

 

Lately, I don't sweat, almost not at all, which is concerning. But, I feel better when I walk. I find that strenuous exercise, like anaerobic exercise, just makes things a lot worse. Getting the blood flowing and moving without resistance helps me the most.

 

This summer I may swim a bit in freshwater. That sounds terrific, except I dont really want to display my body publicly and I will have to since I do not own my own private lake, river, sea or ocean. We shall see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

Hi, and hope everyone had alot of Turkey for Thanksgiving. We were so sick of it we had Chinese Food last night :lol:

 

I know alot of people going thru WD, particularly after a drop in dose are unable to endure physical activity....Been there at times.

 

For me the harder I work (physically) ~ the better off I am mentally & emotionally. While I work, my mind is busy focusing on the task. The physical labor does make me tired and I can go into a deeper sleep.

 

During my Lexapro taper I would Roller Blade with my daughter. We would go 5- miles. This being Southern Florida, jumping in the Ocean/Pool was very good for me too. There were many times I had to lay down after a drop, because I would get that Flu like sensation.

 

The hardest part of WD (for me) was/is, anxiety/the blues. It's a horror. I was always able to endure the physical maladies brought on my decreasing a dose.

 

Over the years I have realized that my personality is the type that does best with alot of physical workouts. It keeps the anxiety/depression away.

 

I work 15 hours a week at TJMaxx and I work at my own business. Cooking Thanksgiving was a killer. I am very tired, but it is a tiredness from work, not WD....Big difference.

 

Want to make a drop in the Celexa (afraid to), but I want to get off of the stuff eventually.

 

Looking forward to having a Saturday off, so I can go to my beach meeting, have brunch with the friends and then spend the afternoon taking a much needed snooze. ;)

 

Hugs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
primrose

Hi Nikki

 

Thanks for the happy thanksgiving and hope you enjoyed yours.

We don't have it in the UK, but I'm kinda glad cos it sounds like another Christmas family thing and I don't have the type of family I want to spend time with at Christmas.

I am like you, physical excercise seems to do me the world of good. It can put me in a good mood.

I am really thankful to say that I can walk the half hour and back to my doctors surgery and feel good when I get back.

Like you though, I suffer from the blues and anxiety. I feel like my life is a mess, but I am accepting the challenge of coming of of it better.

The lack of motivation and the pi$$ed offness prevents me from doing what would really help my withdrawal, that same walk every day for an hour, to put me in a good mood.

I would love a walking craving to take over the blues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

Hi Primrose....

 

I understand that Serquel (I know I spelled that wrong) is rather sedating...Celexa and Imipramine are not sedating.

 

My personality keeps me from just sitting around. Although after work, I do like to watch mindless TV and veg-out.

 

I've mentioned this alot....guided meditation cd's are good medicine for me as well. I listen to them while I lay in bed. Very relaxing and I think some of them can be quite healing.

 

Lots of walking is bound to help with WD and the anxiety....it does for me.

 

Hugs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alexjuice

It's important to care for one's body, IMO, as injuries and illness represent serious risk to a tapering individual.

 

In my case, I injured myself early in the acute phase of my w/d ffrom Effexor and Risperdal by overexerting myself. Aside from the pain, I developed symptoms consistent with prostatitis, which is a very tricky diagnosis. Conventional doctors prescribe antibiotics even without evidence of bacterial infection and I followed doctors orders. The antibiotics likely played a role in the destabilizing of my immune system due to dysbiosis of the GI tract.

 

Since many chronic tension disorders are treated with SNRIs and TCAs targeting norepinephrine, I think it'd be doubly wise to be careful when tapering or experiencing diisrupted equilibrium post-taper with the noradrenergic drugs speifically. Ib my hunch of an opinion.

 

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

Hi Alex...most people who are tapering can't overexert themselves. It an really do a number and cause a set-back. I had that happen with Lexapro.

 

What I am noticing this time around is that in looking back, I did a non-stop type of taper of Lexapro. Drop the dose 1mg. - wait three to four weeks sometimes longer and then drop again.

So I was always tapering for two years.

 

I did engage in physical activity and held a full time job. There were many times I just needed to lay down.

 

This time I am dropping a larger amount (5mgs.) experience WD symptoms. They pass and I wait for a good while (few months) and then drop again. The time in between drops are when I can do alot without suffering a set-back.

 

This seems to work better for me (this time around). We shall see.....what happens in the next drop ;) Hope it continues to be doable.

 

I realize that when I am busy ~ I am better. It helps take the focus off of the WD miseries to a degree. Again, physical symptoms are very bearable for me. It's he anxiety, insomnia and blues that suck the life out of me :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
primrose

Thanks Nikki.

 

I am glad you have found excercise to make you feel better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nadia

I am much better when I am busy as well. And I think I do well when I raise my physical activity, but I have to do it slowly. I started taking some exercise classes lately and walking a lot more and I got the flu-like tiredness and extreme irritability. Once I adapted to the new amount of activity, however, I feel like it helped. But I had to cut myself some slack and reduce first, with plenty of rest afterward. I think the key is to very gradually increase activity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alexjuice

I think the key is to very gradually increase activity.

 

I think Nadia is 100% right.

 

As I said earlier, I got hurt by over doing exercise early in acute w/d and the injury (and antibiotics) changed the course of the last two years.

 

Also, I assume most people judge injury a freak thing, but I wasn't doing anything particularly dangerous. The heaviest weight I ever lifted was a pair of 25lbs weights (so 50 lbs total), an amount most fitness people would judge to be totally manageabel for a 31 year old male of 225+lbs.

 

Nikki, I'm adding this caution to any casual readers of the thread who may be in early w/d rather than specifically adddressing your situation.

 

best,

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gruvedaddy

Exercise helps me quite a bit with my tapering. Although today was the first day i've exercised in months, i know how much it does help with the tiredness and lack of energy. My wife and i have been quite busy with a massive home remodeling project (i know, doesn't exactly help with the anxiety issues) and neither of us have had the energy or time to exercise. But today after work we worked out together for about 45 minutes in front of our light therapy light and i feel so much better than i have of late. I'm looking forward to the next workout Wednesday! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

Alex I totally understand. It's not advisable to become a 'weekend warrior' for anyone in or out of WD from meds.

 

I have in the past had huge setbacks at times like Nadia said, fatigue.

 

For some reason, this does not happen to me now, not for a long time. Maybe I should not question it and just be grateful. :)

 

Then again I suppose I have a high threshold. Yes, starting off slow is the best method.

 

A friend of mine from another site used to tell me about taking cold water showers to stop anxiety and to inject some energy into myself a long time ago. That is helpful too.

 

Hugs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barbarannamated

Exercise helps me quite a bit with my tapering. Although today was the first day i've exercised in months, i know how much it does help with the tiredness and lack of energy. My wife and i have been quite busy with a massive home remodeling project (i know, doesn't exactly help with the anxiety issues) and neither of us have had the energy or time to exercise. But today after work we worked out together for about 45 minutes in front of our light therapy light and i feel so much better than i have of late. I'm looking forward to the next workout Wednesday! :)

 

Gruvedaddy,

 

What type of light therapy? (Apologies if you've mentioned previously)

 

Nikki, rollerblading at the beach looks wonderful. I'm sure it takes alot of strength and energy, but people make it look effortless, gliding with such ease. I tried on a pair of Rollerblades at a store and could barely stand up. Coordination is not my forte. :o.

It's great to be able to share that with your daughter. Team motivation.

 

Full body physical exhaustion is a good feeling, as opposed to straining legs, back, etc.

 

Gruvedaddy.. a massive home remodel??! That's trying under the best of circumstances. You must have a strong marriage!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gruvedaddy

Barbarannamated,

 

I have an older light therapy light that i use. I've begun a little research to see if it's still up to par with what's available nowadays. It has (3) 36 watt type "PL" fluorescent light bulbs. As for the remodel, it has tested the strength of our marriage. But the light at the end of the "remodel tunnel" is getting brighter and we're still holding on. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nadia

In the end, looking back on what I have accomplished the past two years, despite withdrawal, I am amazed! We are capable of so much more than what we think.

 

I have become acutely aware that I'm often my own worst enemy, holding myself back. This doesn't mean that if you think positive you can accomplish anything... certainly going slow is best so you don't overdo it. But just keep going forward.

 

Do not hurry, do not stop!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Narcissus

 

I think the key is to very gradually increase activity.

 

I think Nadia is 100% right.

 

As I said earlier, I got hurt by over doing exercise early in acute w/d and the injury (and antibiotics) changed the course of the last two years.

 

Also, I assume most people judge injury a freak thing, but I wasn't doing anything particularly dangerous. The heaviest weight I ever lifted was a pair of 25lbs weights (so 50 lbs total), an amount most fitness people would judge to be totally manageabel for a 31 year old male of 225+lbs.

 

Nikki, I'm adding this caution to any casual readers of the thread who may be in early w/d rather than specifically adddressing your situation.

 

best,

Alex

 

May I ask in what way you hurt yourself? Do you mean that you somehow damaged your recovering nervous system, or was it a more basic injury?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Narcissus

I've tried exercise a few times now, and I've found that in the period after exercising (usually the next few days) I experience elevated withdrawal symptoms. But since my symptoms are still constantly shifting, it's possible that this has been a coincidence when it's happened. I would really like to be able to exercise, as I'm trying to lose a bit of weight...but I'm scared that if I try my symptoms will flare up again. Do people have the sense that exercise can you set you back in terms of recovery, or does it just cause a temporary agitation? What do we think might be happening physiologically with exercise and withdrawal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Barbarannamated

I've tried exercise a few times now, and I've found that in the period after exercising (usually the next few days) I experience elevated withdrawal symptoms. But since my symptoms are still constantly shifting, it's possible that this has been a coincidence when it's happened. I would really like to be able to exercise, as I'm trying to lose a bit of weight...but I'm scared that if I try my symptoms will flare up again. Do people have the sense that exercise can you set you back in terms of recovery, or does it just cause a temporary agitation? What do we think might be happening physiologically with exercise and withdrawal?

 

I recall this being the case for several people, exactly as you describe. There is a thread about it somewhere (I forget the name).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Narcissus

A day of light moving during a somewhat sensitive state has me reeling. It feels like someone somehow got a handful of my nerves and is twisting them about. Physical exertion seems to really be a trigger for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jemima

A moderate amount of exercise when a person in withdrawal is having a reasonably good day seems to be helpful, but like Barbarannamated, I remember reading quite a few posts about people overdoing exercise and feeling pretty bad for one or more days afterward. (I tried to find the topic, but can't and I think the posts are probably scattered around). I don't think it's any sort of permanent or even long-term setback, but there's no point in making ourselves miserable for even a short period of time. Withdrawal will provide plenty of discomfort all by itself.

 

Our bodies and minds seem to be in such a fragile state during withdrawal that too much of anything can cause problems. It's best to try a tiny bit of something, whether exercise or a supplement, and increase it gradually.

 

I'm also wondering if you were working outside without sunglasses. That may have put your cortisol level in an uproar. Withdrawal causes extreme light sensitivity in most folks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
peggy

the sunlight without sunglasses is a good point Jemima - it would make sense that this could exacerbate cortisol sensitivity issues

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Narcissus

About two weeks ago (5 and a half months after my last withdrawal attempt) I finally regained the ability to exercise. I'm not sure what other people's timetables have been like, but I thought I'd share this development.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Outshined

I definitely benefit from hard (not totally exhausting, but still demanding) physical exercise. I know that generally, for people in withdrawal, depressed, or anxious, it's advised a lighter approach, but I tend to feel better if I push myself a little bit more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

It's touch and go for alot of people during WD. There can be major setbacks of feeling lousy.

 

I did have that happen during a Lexapro taper, but not that often. When it did happen it was a signal to slow down and rest which I did and then it would go away.

 

Having to keep moving is how I am wired. It serves me well.

 

I guess it comes down to listening to our bodies.

 

Physical busyness has been good for me mentally. I am not in a WD mode right now. Even when I was, physical activity helped alot and for me even during WD. It helped me maintain my sanity or what was left of it.

 

I remember going for 5k walks and crying after a drop in dose. Maybe it was cleansing.

 

Listen to your body B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
starlitegirlx

I started exercising two weeks ago. Mostly walking and weight routines I did before I tapered. I don't exercise on days with WD symptoms (that aren't the minor ones I can deal with like minor blurry vision). So on those good days, I workout. I joined a gym just up the street and it's very small with not a lot of members so I can generally get on a treadmill or the weight machines with no problem. I've found that the treadmill for 30-40 minutes helps a lot. I even set it on an incline for the first 20 minutes to work my glutes and hamstrings. But I don't push so hard that I'm wiped out from it or too sore or even putting my taper at risk of triggering more WD. I just push so I feel like I'm getting a good workout or maybe a bit harder. But when it feels too intense, I back off since I'd rather exercise more days than less and if I push to hard that means more rest days are needed. The weights are the thing that really make me sore. But I really think they are most beneficial because they require balance, attention to form, focus and weight training is generally beneficial to most people.

 

I started slower and do what I can handle. I take days off from exercising when I'm sore post workout and/or dealing with WD symptoms. I push a bit during my workouts, but not too hard because the goal is to keep at it regularly rather than go so hard I'm not able to continue. This balanced approach seems to be working so far. I started working out to lose the 40lbs I gained since I began the tapers but now I find that it's not only about losing the weight. I like that it's a nice way to break up the day and it's also a nice way to feel better about myself - physically and emotionally. It relieves stress and burns off energy so that I do get some better sleep and even naps at times. So there are a lot of pluses. It's just a matter of not pushing ones self too much during the WD and balancing how much or how hard to work out and when to work out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

When things slow down here I would like to join the gym....they have marvelous deals out there now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rhiannon

 

I think the key is to very gradually increase activity.

 

I think Nadia is 100% right.

 

As I said earlier, I got hurt by over doing exercise early in acute w/d and the injury (and antibiotics) changed the course of the last two years.

 

Also, I assume most people judge injury a freak thing, but I wasn't doing anything particularly dangerous. The heaviest weight I ever lifted was a pair of 25lbs weights (so 50 lbs total), an amount most fitness people would judge to be totally manageabel for a 31 year old male of 225+lbs.

 

Nikki, I'm adding this caution to any casual readers of the thread who may be in early w/d rather than specifically adddressing your situation.

 

best,

Alex

 

When I first started my taper I was in more intense withdrawal than now and I noticed that there seemed to be a problem with my connective tissue healing--I would injure myself more easily and it would heal more slowly. I've heard the same thing reported by others, not extremely frequently but still consistently from time to time, especially with benzo withdrawal. I suspect there may be some involvement of glutamate in connective tissue health. Anyway, this isn't the first time I've heard of this sort of thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Narcissus

About two weeks ago (5 and a half months after my last withdrawal attempt) I finally regained the ability to exercise. I'm not sure what other people's timetables have been like, but I thought I'd share this development.

 

I spoke too soon. Tried some modest weight lifting and suffered a bad flare-up. I hardly have them now so there's no question regarding the culprit.

 

I really would like to bulk up a little, I'm feeling mighty unsexy these days with my post-withdrawal flab. Oh well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nikki

I would like to join one of our local gyms. The deals are great (for muscle tone) and then I think, just go out and walk.

 

I am fortunate not to have the problems others experience with physical labor.

 

I have not dropped a dose in quite sometime and that may be the reason. It is also a large part of my constitution. I have quite a bit of stamina.

 

A problem with tiredness is just not getting enough sleep.

 

Maybe the best thing is just walking :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×