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Exercise ... Do more, do less, do nothing? What worked for you?

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Maybe

Same here. I just hope my system will be able to heal/rebalance.

 

How long were your walks you undertook? As I felt bad again last night I swore to myself that I will go for a short 15 minutes walk everyday now. I somehow think that just waiting is not correcting the wrongs the meds have done.

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Shanti

Have you considered Yoga? It really gets the body in alignment and energy flowing right. I can't do it right now, so just doing the Pranayama. Here's a good gentle, 10 minute Yoga exercise:

 

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Maybe

Many of my relatives said I should go to a Yoga course, but I do not have the energy besides work. But as I see there are surely some work outs one can do at home.

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Shanti

Yes, I'd never make it to a Yoga class! There are many videos at Youtube. There are also many gentle yoga DVDs you can find at Amazon and eBay.

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Maybe

Oh sorry, I haven't seen your last post, Shanti!

 

I am a bit afraid of doing exercises where I have to lay down and move around a lot in different positions. I will stay with just walking for a little while, until I feel some improvement.

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Shanti

Oh sorry, I haven't seen your last post, Shanti!

 

I am a bit afraid of doing exercises where I have to lay down and move around a lot in different positions. I will stay with just walking for a little while, until I feel some improvement.

 

Same here. I talk about Yoga but I can't actually do it much lol. I used to. I'll get back into it but for now I'm doing the Pranayama. I just do a few stretches here and there. I finally got to where I can walk 2 blocks now. Yay! That's progress :)

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Nadia

Very interesting. When I walk only for maybe up to 20 or 30 minutes I feel ok, but up to an hour and I am miserable.

 

Maybe we still do not have enough receptors to reabsorb the serotonin that is produced then?

 

Interesting what you guys say about feeling bad a few hours after exercising. I find that I often feel bad in the late afternoon when I've walked and exercised in the morning, more if I jogged. What I feel is kind of like flu symptoms. I feel achy, and really grumpy/sensitive, like when you have a fever, except I don't get a fever. And a dull headache. Is that anything like what you guys feel? I always think of it as a "cortisol hangover".

 

It decreased when I was doing better, though, even though I was exercising, and I think exercising is in large part what got me better. But even at my best, when I was on my trip, if I over-exerted myself I would feel so tired and sick after, and not "normal" tired, which prompted me on a couple of occasions to tell my BF that I knew I wasn't 100% better yet. However, I overexerted myself regularly and yet on the whole was doing SO well.

 

Now that I had a setback with anxiety and depression I'm back to how it was before, but I'm still not willing to stop walking and exercising (my exercising is mostly stretching), because if I don't, my anxiety gets much, much worse, and so does my sleep. It's hard to find the right amount of exercise. Sometimes I'm even tempted to over-exert myself on purpose, in an attempt to break through what I'm going through, even if it means being sick, because one difference between now and when I was doing well is that now I spend hours in front of the computer while before I was walking almost all day (with breaks in between).

 

But I wouldn't be thinking that if I got so sick I couldn't walk or stuff like happens to some people who are worse off than I am right now... and I'm not sure it's wise. I think slow and steady and gradual is surely the way to go.

 

My reasoning about this has been guided by the relationship I think might exist to the types of mechanisms that occur for people with immune system disorders. At some point I hope to start another thread about that to see what you guys think.

 

In any case... I DO wonder what is going on on a biological level for all these symptoms. It's a puzzle that is impossible to resolve, but I'm constantly sorting the pieces in my mind out of desperation.

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alexjuice

I have also found exercise helpful in coping/anxiety.

 

I walk30 minutes a day the last few days. Eventually I'd like to play pickup basketball something I enjoyed in my youth. I am no way ready for full court basketball, even if I wasn't in this weird neuro-junk place. At attempt at sprinting a basketball court would probably,at best, end in an up chuck.

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Guest damnnardil

I am experiencing what I would call kind of a self tease. Because of my energy level and the stiffness or soreness in my legs and the lack of endurance from my antidepresssant, I have a very predictable cycle I go through. I work out and jog once every 3 days for about 3 hours. By the time I am done with this enormous workout, I feel like I did before I had any medicine in me. I am sharp, I can think clearly, my moods is very high and positive, I feel like my witdrawal or depression or really it is more anxiety, is pretty much gone and I can go on with life. By the time I take my next two or three doses of medicine that I am weening off of, My brain returns to the withdrawal or anxiety condition until my next work out. Don't try and tell me I should jog every day or every other day, less time and it would serve me better. Been there done that. This is what works for me and it is very frustrating, knowing I am going back down and it is predictable. I have at least a year before I'm off the meds and so I have to endure a year of predictable ups and downs. Damnnnnnnnnn! :angry:

:mellow:

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Nadia

I am experiencing what I would call kind of a self tease. Because of my energy level and the stiffness or soreness in my legs and the lack of endurance from my antidepresssant, I have a very predictable cycle I go through. I work out and jog once every 3 days for about 3 hours. By the time I am done with this enormous workout, I feel like I did before I had any medicine in me. I am sharp, I can think clearly, my moods is very high and positive, I feel like my witdrawal or depression or really it is more anxiety, is pretty much gone and I can go on with life. By the time I take my next two or three doses of medicine that I am weening off of, My brain returns to the withdrawal or anxiety condition until my next work out. Don't try and tell me I should jog every day or every other day, less time and it would serve me better. Been there done that. This is what works for me and it is very frustrating, knowing I am going back down and it is predictable. I have at least a year before I'm off the meds and so I have to endure a year of predictable ups and downs. Damnnnnnnnnn! :angry:

:mellow:

 

I can really relate to feeling really good after exercising (though I do much less and daily). Just out of curiosity, how come the less and daily doesn't work for you? What happens? Or is it that it just doesn't get you to the point of feeling good?

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Guest damnnardil

Hi Nadia. I am on a special body building regimen and I work out so hard on that one day that I am exhausted for the next two. It would not make a whole lot of difference if I did less everyday anyhow because the hour jog does not do to my brain positively, what the 3 hour intense workout does and I get a residual effect of about a day from the intense workout I do and I also am losing the weight quicker and cutting up quicker as well, which the weight gain was soley due to he Nardil. I need the weight off as fast as I can. It bother's me in many ways :)

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Nadia

Oh, I see... I sometimes am tempted to do more exercise at once to get more of the good feeling rush... but since I'm not trying to lose weight I do OK with everyday.

 

I hope that weight comes off fast and you can go even out your workouts and your mood soon! Up and down is tough!

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Whatever

Long periods of exercise, such as three hours are counterproductive and can lead to overtraining.

 

When you workout for long stretches of time you run the risk of losing muscle mass. The only way around this is to replenish your body with a carb dense drink during exercise.

 

Also, the body quickly adapts to exercise and one ends up burning less calories. It is the same principle of what happens with pmeds and the brain. The way around this is to change exercise routines every six weeks and to add resistance training. This is especially true of people who do nothing but long bouts of cardiovascular exercise. If you have ever seen an aerobics instructor who teaches 10 classes a week and is fat, that is why.

 

If you are working out with weights you must rest for 24-48 hours before you engage in more weightlifting. The gains made in bodybuilding actually occur during the rest period and not during the exercise portion. In weightlifting you tear the muscle and during the rest period the muscle repairs itself and becomes stronger. Muscle soreness is part of weightlifting, but after a few weeks you should only feel mild soreness or none at all. If you are still feeling sore then you are overtraining.

 

Regarding overtraining - it can lead to severe depression.

 

A good exercise program includes cardiovascular training (30 minutes 5 times a week), resistance training (2-3 times a week) and stretching, such as Yoga or Pilates.

 

It is difficult to exercise when on pmeds or when in WD. But 20 minutes of walking is the best exercise you can do, and as you get stronger change the pace or incline. Also, finding a physical activity you like to do such as Zumba will keep you committed while building your confidence and bringing joy to your life and allowing you to focus on something other than your problems.

 

Please feel free to ask me any questions regarding exercise as I am a certified AFAA fitness professional, Zumba instructor, and a former professional dancer.

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Barbarannamated

Whatever~

I saw ad for new indoor trampoline gymnasiums that are springing up across USA ~

Looks like a BLAST :)

Used to go to these at beach when a kid back in the dark ages ~jump and jump and jump and sometimes get crazy and do a somersault ;)

 

Several are slated to open in SoCal and it looks like great way to blow off steam without impact (not getting into the competitive sports)~

Any thoughts on starting with some plain jumping up and down for 15 minutes or so

 

Maybe i'll progress to trampaerobics someday

 

Skyzone ~SkyHigh Sports ~Jumpstreet are a few chains

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Whatever

What a great idea for a workout! It will invoke the feelings of childhood!

 

Trampoline workouts are great because they utilize HIIT High Intensity Interval Training. HIIT is believed to be one of the most effective forms of cardio, optimizing calories burned. HIIT Training can be done in as little as 20 minutes to be effective.

 

Trampoline workouts are also low impact and develop coordination and balance. Just be wary if you have any history  of ankle or knee joint problems or surgeries - as you must be careful to practice controlled form and land in good aligment. But, you can also practice balance exercises or yoga to strengthen joints and balance or I can give you links to propriorception  training which us amazing.

 

This is a very beginning workout, based on someone who is reconditioned.

 

5 minute warmup

 

Jump up and down in controlled movements, keeping the height the same and landing in the same place

 

2 Minute Interval #1

 

Stand feet hip width apart and jump up and down controlling the movements and landing in the same place. As you do this start jumping higher or change the jump by folding your legs back

 

5 Minute Interval #2

 

Take a basic walk around the trampoline using slow controlled movements, allow your arms to swing naturally at your side

 

2 Minute Interval #3

 

Now move to the center and perform a jog, using controlled movements

 

3 Minute Interval  #4

 

Again, take a basic walk around the trampoline

 

Get off the trampoline and walk for five minutes to get your heart rate down and regain your balance.

 

After you have gotten your heart rate down make sure to stretch. Perform static stretches and hold them for 45-60 minutes.

 

If this is too hard just work as long as you can and then move onto the next interval. If it is too easy, then increase the intensity, increase the interval time or maintain the interval time and ad more intervals.

 

Hope this helps!

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Barbarannamated

Thanks :-)

 

My proprioception has been off for a long time and I dont lnow why

I am a 'heel walker' and also lean back when I ride my horses(although I feel like im straight up or even leaning forward)

I tried the Dr Scholls orthotic machine in pharmacy and same thing -- I lean back when I feel that im straight vertical

I tried Sketchers shoes in store one time and fell off the back (rounded heel)

 

Im used to being a clutz but this is strange even for me

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Whatever

I am a heel walker too.

 

I have problems with prioperception. I am 48.

 

Yet, I am a former professional dancer. As we age all these things come to the forefront. Some of my closest friends danced for the NYC ballet or with Barshnikov at the Kirvov or ABT. They are nowhere what they once were. We all have our problems. And we still dance and we forgive our bodies fir betraying us.

 

I can send you excellent links to help you with this if you want. Just PM me.

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Barbarannamated

The person who recognized that I'm a heel walker happens to be a professional dancer (female in bluish dress in MJ'S Thriller vid ~now a PhysicalTherapist)

 

I was given 2 left feet but love to watch dancing :) Will pm you ~THANKS

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Nadia

Trampolines! Now THAT is something I might pay for.

 

Whatever, here's what I do for exercise, I'm wondering your opinion: I walk/jog about 3 miles a day (all in all, it takes me about 45 minutes). First, I walk to the park at a normal pace. Once at the park, I go around three times. Over time I've started to jog. It depends on the day if I'm up for it or not. But generally I try to jog at least 1/3 to 1/2 of the way. One thing I do, which I'm not sure is good or not, is that I walk/jog/walk/jog/walk... in little spurts (1/4 to 1/2 mile). I don't know if I'm doing that because I'm being wimpy, or if maybe it's what my body is telling me is the right thing to do. I do this exercise almost every day (on average 6 out of 7 days a week, but many times 7 days a week) because I can't seem to the handle my anxiety otherwise.

 

When I get home, I do a slow, 30 minute session of a combinaton of pilates, yoga and back exercises and stretches. I try to do these every day or my neck and lower back really bother me (this started a couple of years ago after going to a chiropracter... he left me in worse shape than went I went in for treatment). Sometimes I suspect the back pain is related to withdrawal, though. Maybe it just makes me more sensitive to it.

 

 

Thanks!

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Whatever

Nadia: you are doing everything right!

 

The walk/jog etc. is the best - it is called HIIT and it is an extremely effective way to perform cardio. 45 minutes is a good amount of time for cardio. If you can add running up stairs or on a hill or walking or jogging backward you can challenge youf body more.

 

Stretching AFTER cardio is also best. One should never stretch until the body is warmed up. The only thing that is missing is resistance training, although Pilates does include some resistance work. You do not need weights or a gym to do this. Using your own body as resistance is enough. Push-ups are the single best resistance exercise one can do because they work a lot of muscles at the same time. Most woman have a hard time doing pushups, but start slow - do one or two using perfect form and as you get stronger you will be able to do more.

 

Hope that helps!

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Nadia

Nadia: you are doing everything right!

 

The walk/jog etc. is the best - it is called HIIT and it is an extremely effective way to perform cardio. 45 minutes is a good amount of time for cardio. If you can add running up stairs or on a hill or walking or jogging backward you can challenge youf body more.

 

Stretching AFTER cardio is also best. One should never stretch until the body is warmed up. The only thing that is missing is resistance training, although Pilates does include some resistance work. You do not need weights or a gym to do this. Using your own body as resistance is enough. Push-ups are the single best resistance exercise one can do because they work a lot of muscles at the same time. Most woman have a hard time doing pushups, but start slow - do one or two using perfect form and as you get stronger you will be able to do more.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Yes, it does! Thank you! I live on the fourth story of a building with no elevator, so I can probably do some running up stairs at home.

 

That is good to know about the stretching... often I've wondered if I should invert the order or not.

 

I'll look into resistance training as well. I forgot to mention a little bit of what I include in my 30 minute workout is Callanetics... it was a big thing in the 80s and I used to do the full work out. I can't really manage that now, but it used to do amazing things for my body... more so than yoga or pilates or anything. I wonder if some of the exercises are resistance training or not.

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Barbarannamated

I'm exhausted just reading what you do Nadia and others ~ I barely make it to crucial rooms of the house

My wd symptoms aren't as limiting as this absolute lack of energy even after sleeping through nite and at least a few hours of day

It's not pain or depression…it is paralyzing fatigue • did others go through this 'parasympathetic phase' after the cortisol mornings and anxiety abated (Q)

 

The thought of trampolines did perk me up for a few minutes ;)

 

I've always been a very low energy person

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Whatever

Nadia:

 

 

Calisthenics is cardio. Resistance training is anything that strengthens and builds muscle mass. Typically weight lifting. But the weights need to be heavy enough to challenge you. Many women are misled in the concept of toning. Toning is a marketing ploy, playing into the fears women have about their bodies and it has basis in exercise science. In toning you lift light weights many times. Usually the weights weigh less than a bag of groceries, a carton of milk, in otherwords items you lift everyday. 

 

Here is an excellent book on the topic:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1583332944

 

Barbara: Get through the WDs and go at the pace that works for you!

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Nadia

I'm exhausted just reading what you do Nadia and others ~ I barely make it to crucial rooms of the house

My wd symptoms aren't as limiting as this absolute lack of energy even after sleeping through nite and at least a few hours of day

It's not pain or depression…it is paralyzing fatigue • did others go through this 'parasympathetic phase' after the cortisol mornings and anxiety abated (Q)

 

The thought of trampolines did perk me up for a few minutes ;)

 

I've always been a very low energy person

 

I've always been fairly low energy as well. I've never been much of an exerciser. Believe me, though, what I do is pretty basic and not intensive.

 

Honestly, sometimes I wish I was in a paralyzing fatigue state... as long as I had a vacation and could just sleep and sleeeeep!

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Nadia

 

Calisthenics is cardio.

 

 

Not calisthenics! Callanetics! http://www.callanetics.com/

 

Apparently they've "updated" it now, but the version I did was the old 80s stuff... repetitive small movements.

 

Resistance training is anything that strengthens and builds muscle mass. Typically weight lifting. But the weights need to be heavy enough to challenge you. Many women are misled in the concept of toning. Toning is a marketing ploy, playing into the fears women have about their bodies and it has basis in exercise science. In toning you lift light weights many times. Usually the weights weigh less than a bag of groceries, a carton of milk, in otherwords items you lift everyday. 

 

Here is an excellent book on the topic:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1583332944

 

Barbara: Get through the WDs and go at the pace that works for you!

 

Ah, OK. I tend to stay away from weights because I don't want big muscles... I suppose the important part is stretching so you don't build bulk?

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alexjuice

Hey Nadia,

 

What whatever (hey that's a way to start a sentence) is trying to say is that resistance training is what causes toning and that unless you intentionally target muscles group doing few reps with heavy weight, you are not going to gain bulky manly muscles. Resistance work is great for woman who desire better body composition -- fat tissue vs lean tissue -- which is what most ladies mean by 'toning'.

 

Whatever whatever says, I think she will agree with what I wrote above. If she doesn't agree... whatever! LOL!

 

Ha. Whatevs, you've got a funforme handle!

 

Alex

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Whatever

1. No, diet is was controls bulk. If you build muscle and have fat over the muscle you will appear bulky.

 

2. It is scientifically impossible for women to build bulky muscles because we lack the testosterone to do so. Competitive female body builders are big because they take steroids.

 

3. The concept that woman can build bulky muscles is a marketing lie used to sell all sorts of stuff to women.

 

4. Here is a video of my friend who lifts heavy weights several times a week (she leg presses 250 lbs). BTW she is 61 years old.Tell me does she look bulky?

 

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=you+tube+Zumba+with+Cassie+I+like+it+like+that&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBsQtwIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DpTAY6Zh21FQ&ei=ZBAGT8a4PKjv0gHf0cDlDg&usg=AFQjCNH6bye7kZdjBWjKpIq6bvbhmlKMZQ

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Whatever

Alex - Yes, I agree about the fat v lean tissue in body composition. But I disagree with your point about avoiding heavy weights, few reps to avoid bulky muscles. I was actually saying the exact opposite of that.

 

Women have be sold the lie that when it comes to weightlifting they need to do high reps with light weights. This is 1) not going to strengthen the muscle, 2) is essentially cardio and endurance training and 3) a total waste if time.

 

Lifting heavy weights is was makes muscle strong, strong muscles when combined with a lean diet result in muscle definition or what some people call toning. But, there is actually no such thing as toning.

 

Here is an article that better explains what I am trying to say:

 

http://www.stumptuous.com/lies-in-the-gym

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Nadia

Hey Nadia,

 

What whatever (hey that's a way to start a sentence) is trying to say is that resistance training is what causes toning and that unless you intentionally target muscles group doing few reps with heavy weight, you are not going to gain bulky manly muscles. Resistance work is great for woman who desire better body composition -- fat tissue vs lean tissue -- which is what most ladies mean by 'toning'.

 

Whatever whatever says, I think she will agree with what I wrote above. If she doesn't agree... whatever! LOL!

 

Ha. Whatevs, you've got a funforme handle!

 

Alex

 

Ha ha ha!

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Nadia

Alex - Yes, I agree about the fat v lean tissue in body composition. But I disagree with your point about avoiding heavy weights, few reps to avoid bulky muscles. I was actually saying the exact opposite of that.

 

Women have be sold the lie that when it comes to weightlifting they need to do high reps with light weights. This is 1) not going to strengthen the muscle, 2) is essentially cardio and endurance training and 3) a total waste if time.

 

Lifting heavy weights is was makes muscle strong, strong muscles when combined with a lean diet result in muscle definition or what some people call toning. But, there is actually no such thing as toning.

 

Here is an article that better explains what I am trying to say:

 

http://www.stumptuous.com/lies-in-the-gym

 

I was always told in exercise classes and dance classes that to avoid bulky muscles, stretching is important.

 

Anway... Callanetics is the only exercise I've done that has given me the muscle definition I like... really hard muscles, but not bulky.

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alexjuice

Hey whatever,

 

Makes sense to me. I'm glad you're here with some fitness insight.

 

I myself would like to do some weight training but I am frightened. Early in my w.d I suffered n injury that has dramatic repercussions and have been taking a waitandsee attitude since. Plus I don't think I'm quite ready to tax my body like that. But some day I hope.

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Jackson

Just to further illustrate the point that Whatevs is trying to make.

 

Posted Image

 

 

Posted Image

 

 

She is absolutely correct, it is more or less impossible for women to get bulky muscles, unless they inject anabolic steroids or other illegal substances like HGH (human growth hormone). If you want a sleek and toned body, you need to lift fairly heavy weights for lower amount of repetitions, and then diet down to lower your bodyfat percentage.

 

Building muscle is a very very slow process. It takes YEARS of dedication, planning and very hard work ON TOP of the illegal substances to get to a point where a woman looks bulky. The female bodybuilders are LIVING in the gym, and they are pretty much walking pharmacies. It is almost insulting to them and their achievements, when regular looking women are afraid to pick up weights, because they believe they will blow up in size overnight. It just doesn't happen.

 

Hope that gave a little more perspective on muscle building :)

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Whatever

Thank you Jackson!!!!! I felt like I was spitting in the wind there for awhile.

 

May I add one more benefit of weight training > a higher metabolism, meaning you can eat more or if you eat the same you will lose weight.

 

Women tend to think the more calories they burn the more fat they will lose. While it is true that an hour of running will burn a lot more calories than one hour of weight training. In the end building muscle through weight training will

turn your body into a fat burning mega machine.

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Shanti

Still can't walk, and I absolutely must get my body healing and stronger. I will have to work soon and I know it will be agony if I don't get a handle on this pain at least a little bit. I am able to do a few gentle back yoga excercises like the Cobra. This is helping my back some. So I looked up some exercises for people that can't walk. I found some here at Sit and Be Fit.

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Nikki

During Lexapro WD I used to Rollerblade with my daughter. We went for 7 miles in addition to swimming. It was a great outlet for me, but there would come a point where I would burn out. During that burnout I would want to kick myself in the rear. It was back on the sofa nursing my aches/pains/tingles and most of all the blues from not feeling well yet again....

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Rhiannon

This one drives me nuts. Exercise used to be the one thing that I could always count on. I used to be in such good shape. Now--hardly! I walk, and I use a stationary recumbent bike at home, depending on the weather and how agoraphobic I'm feeling. But so minimally, both of them. And when I do anything strenuous on my muscles, even the lightest weights, I am so sore and achy afterwards I can hardly move.

 

I also find that just stress, new activities, travel, etc. will wipe me out and ramp up my symptoms. And a busy day at my job will take me down too.

 

Constantly struggling to find balance between too much inactivity and isolation, and too little rest and quiet.

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