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Exercise ... Do more, do less, do nothing? What worked for you?

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Cressida

That's fortunate for you as there are so many benefits to exercise. There's a big variation not only between individuals but for people at different stages of WD . For those very sensitive to cortisol fluctuations it seems to cause problems. Hopefully as that diminishes over time exercise tolerance will increase

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Celeste

 

Addax, on 10 Feb 2015 - 4:18 PM, said:snapback.png

I responded in another thread about this issue but I can't recall which one. I'll look for it as well as a journal article. In the meantime the readers digest version is: exercise is stress on the body and the body reacts by producing cortisol. The more intense the exercise the more cortisol produced. 

Higher intensity exercise worked well in decreasing my anxiety and other symptoms until I fell into a particularly harsh wave, if you will. At that point the opposit became true until I stabilized again at which point it again became a stress reliever. 

Yoga is a good alternative. Restorative yoga would be a good option, as would any gent all or basic yoga class.

That is very useful thank you. It helps me to understand what is a trigger and how it works. Makes sense. 

 

Yes, I agree. If you happen to find the article you mentioned Addax, it would be very much appreciated! Sometimes the symptoms of withdrawal seem so mysterious and random...like they have no triggers and just come up whenever. It's nice when there is any science or explanation behind it all.

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MissTrish

 

 

During the summer I can do a little bit of running (very little, alternating with walking), but it feels good. I don't run during winter, so I figured I would take a zumba class once a week for cardio and regain a bit of fitness... My first class was yesterday, wasn't easy but I paced myself, and I liked it. BUT it has affected my sleep last night and today I have a lot more irritability and feel like everything is the end of the world... I so much hate that.

 

Athena, how are you doing with Zumba?  I have been doing Zumba (gold, a less intensive version) twice a week for over a year now, in the late mornings, and it's good for my mental state, and I love it, but I have noticed difficult nights afterwards.  Last night was one.  I hate that because I really love my classes!  I also do a gentle yoga class once a week and that seems to be really helpful for my muscles, but I notice more fatigue and a slight irritability in the evenings afterwards.

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WiggleIt

Yesterday I was having a fairly decent day. I did a lot of laundry and groomed my dogs, brushing and nails...I have 4, and did quite a bit of vacuuming. I also did some picking up. I had a call from my health plan and they had a cancellation and wanted me to come in for a consult prior to a sleep study and so I said I would take it. I had to drive about 25 min into a busy area and so it was somewhat stressful. I came home and laid down for a while because I was feeling sleepy.( I wake up too early in the AM.... about 4:30-5AM.) I dozed a bit. I then went to visit my mom and did about 20 min of light pool exercise at her retirement center. We had dinner and then I came home. I was going to walk my dogs with my roommate but was feeling really lousy, like I was getting the flu so we didn't do it. I have had this happen a couple of other times and I think I was just too physically active. I felt really horrible for about an hour, I had to be lying down. I feel ok this morning but worried about over doing it again today. I have fibromyalgia and took AD's for it. Some of them really helped but cannot take the side effects anymore. I am not taking any meds for it now. I have gotten too sensitive and cannot even take pain killers like aspirin. I am wondering if anyone else has had a reaction like this to exercise or physical activity or is it maybe just my fibro symptoms without any treatments.

 

I feel fairly certain saying that what you are experiencing is withdrawal.  I, too, was put on tricyclics and benzodiazepines for "chronic" pain.  I got worse over the years and finally figured out it was medication side effects.  I quickly reduced and then cold turkeyed off the meds, according to doctor and manufacturer instructions, and am still plagued by side effects plus withdrawal symptoms.

 

However, I am doing light physical therapy which is noticeably improving the location of my supposedly "chronic" pain.  My new pain doctor and physical therapist figured out that my chronic pain diagnosis from years back was wrong.  I had sustained a deep, tricky muscle injury and ruptured disk in my back, but my former doctors overlooked the injury and said I had incurable pain and HAD to be on meds.

 

Now, the location of pain at the site of my injury and the areas surrounding the injury are better.  Every other physical symptom I have is listed as a side effect and documented as a withdrawal effect of the tricyclic and benzodiazepines.

 

Of course, I may be wrong about my assessment of your situation, since you know your body better than I do.  But I do know my body best and can say with certainty what happened to me, so you can use the situation for comparison and contrast if you wish.

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vonant

I am pretty far in withdrawal (3,5 years post last dosage of Citalopram). I still have a lot of symptoms though, mostly physical I suspect related to hormonal issues (weight gain, sexual dysfunction, sweating, hairloss etc.) In the last couple of months I have experienced some mild flu attacks. I know it is flu season but they seem to come after i have exercised. yesterday i helped tear down a ceiling and even that left me with mild fever and flu like symptoms. anyone else experience cold/flu/feverish symptoms after exercise? is it related to all the rest?

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Petunia

Hi vonant,

Yes, many people do experience a a lowered tolerance for exercise when in withdrawal.  We recommend mild to moderate exercise up to a level which doesn't increase withdrawal symptoms.  This discussion topic has more information:

Exercise: what, when, and when its too much

 

Please would you start a new introduction thread for yourself in our introductions/update forum, so that we can get to know you and your situation.

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Mort81

Hey Gemeni Girl , I loved to be active before WD , I played hockey ,lifted weights , yoga , etc.. all the time but since going through WD for me its been too hard to exercise, its been somewhat crushing to me but i have begun to except it may take awile for things to calm down. I only go for light walks as nature feels so good to me. I totally agree with what Dave says though , listen to your body , everyones body is at a different point of progress and will respond differently.  if you can exercise and it feels good than thats huge and you should continue. You may have to ease into it to see how your body responds. good luck 

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thinkpink

Great thread. I feel really weird when I exercise now, similar symptoms to a panic attack (dizzy, racing heart, depersonalisation) but its not a panic attack. Its like cardio somehow 'triggers' a load of symptoms and instead of enjoying exercise the way I used to, I dread it now because it makes me feel unwell and I can't exercise the way I used too.Moonlitelotus, I am like you, used to be really fit and active, ran loads and enjoyed the gym, symptoms have really gotten in thr way now. I pray over time tjings change because I love working out and some exercise is important to the healing process I believe. Pink.

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freespirit

I have exercised throughout wd, but in gentle forms primarily. I do qi gong practice daily--this has been my mainstay and most important factor in getting through this time. It helps with both physical and emotional symptoms, and is also my main form of spiritual practice.

 

I walk, swim, or bike 6 days a week. I have to vary the times I do exercise, the amounts, and intensity. Instead of setting some time amount or standard, I simply go each time with what feels right to my body. I've only had a couple of times of feeling unwell from exercise, and that was riding a bit more intensely on my bike.

 

Exercise has been especially important since I stopped Remeron...being outside and walking saved me through the winter. It lifts my mood about 99% of the time and often lifts whatever physical symptoms I'm having too. Key for me is really listening, and not overdoing.

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shelby

I'm finding it more difficult to exercise especially since my dizziness has gotten worse. Any Suggestions?

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shelby

I just find it hard to walk when I'm so dizzy. Of course I did not realize strenuous exercise can increase cortisol.

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Lovofsun

I'm in the same position at the moment any exercise is hard for me at the mo....

 

I get extreme fatigue and anxiety which includes dizziness :(

 

I'm hoping it passes quick as exercise really helped me with my anxiety in the pass.

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chris111

I am currently walking for about 30 minutes a day (it seems to be keeping me alert), although I have not really want to push the weights (I really want to). because of the fear of aggravating my symptoms.

 

 

 

Anybody see any improvements to the symptoms by going to the gym along with lifting weights or just having a regular gym session? Or does the exact opposite happen?

 

 

 

 

 

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Addax

Currently weights and running help me a lot, especially if I'm feeling some anxiety or even mild akathisia. It definitely helps with mood, but I've been pretty stable for a couple months now.

 

I went through a period of about 3 months when my withdrawal symptoms were horrendous and exercise made me feel worse or just didnt help. Even when it made me feel worse, the feeling worse was temporary. By that I mean it didn't seem to make me feel worse over all, just during and directly afterward.

 

I think it's different depending on how your symptoms are in general. Most might say that it's not a great idea to change things too much if you feel like your stability is fragile. If you really want to go to the gym you can always go and just take it very easy to see how it feels.

Either way, it's great that you're walking. Physical activity is healing and I believe some form of it extremely important during withdrawal.

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a99

i'm 14 months off and I hardly leave the bed , I feel so tired most of the time and I can't  handle even a moderate walk , is this common ? feeling so frustrated knowing how physical activity can help the recovery  :(

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Petunia

Low tolerance for exercise is common in withdrawal, please read the link which I posted above.

Edited by Petunia
strike through/irrelevant, topics merged

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JanCarol

Every day, rain or shine, hot or cold, I put on a t-top and shorts, and walk 10 minutes.  I walk as fast or as slowly as I I feel like, as early as possible in the day (right now, that is about 1 pm).  This is the bare minimum.

 

I agree with Narcissus, who said last year:

 

I guess what I really want to do is encourage the long term sufferers here to try exerting themselves every now and then, even if it hurts initially and feels like a setback.  It might be exactly what's needed at certain times.  For me, the recommended walks in nature have not been sufficient to clear my symptoms, and long walks often seem to make me feel worse.  More vigorous exercise seems to have a qualitatively different effect, it seems to give my system a kind of jolt, similar to acupuncture treatments.  In other words, it seems to have a destabilizing effect, and while that words is somewhat maligned here (and understandably so), I'm convinced that some of the stability we achieve in withdrawal is unhealthy and should be disrupted. 

 

I think this is true for GENERAL mental health and wellness.  It is how I do my karate.  I go, dragging my feet, sometimes crying, and then submit to the class and do as I'm told.  AS SOON AS I GET HOME I jump into that magnesium bath.  I do the same for yoga.  Even if I felt like, "Oh, that was a really gentle class, it went really well" - I still hit the magnesium bath, because the price to pay if I am wrong - if I did overdo - is too high.  (My body finally seems to be okay with one karate class a week, but I still may have to quit again because my hand doesn't like it.)

 

However, in withdrawal, you are basically growing and rewiring a brain.  And the brain loves to use all your energy!

 

If your car is up on blocks, with all the electronics out, and low on fluids, it is not a good time to take it out for a performance drive!  Of course, brains aren't as mechanical as that, but even though my withdrawal is different (lithium rather than AD), while the brain is off kilter, it takes a LOT of energy.  

 

I have other problems too - and if I do ANYthing too hard or too long, I will pay for it.  Additionally - many people feel that "OMG I feel good today" and "Now is the time to DO STUFF."  Resist it.  Stick to your gentle routine, to avoid spikes and crashes.  And I acknowledge - those of us who are older feel like the slippery slope of aging is looming, and that if we don't exercise, we will die!  It's true - but if you overdo - then you undo your progress!

 

OVER TIME (and I mean, like years) you should be able to build up cardio, strength, flexibility, and endorphins.

 

Oh yeah, that was it:

 

Peggy said:

 

for me exercise is a very good anxiolytic.  Unfortunately i can't spend all day exercising, but the benefits of getting my heart rate up and puffing for 30mins last me a good few hours

 

While Addax warned:

 

 

In the meantime the readers digest version is: exercise is stress on the body and the body reacts by producing cortisol. The more intense the exercise the more cortisol produced. 

 

 

And Cressida put the two together:

 

I find walking for half an hour usually makes me feel good at the time then kicks off an exacerbation of symptoms.

 

It's like this:  as you exercise, the endorphins flow.  I'm not talking about the intensity of the runner's high - more of a blood is moving, muscles are moving, starts the juices flowing kind of gentle endorphins.  These can start quite easily, especially if you are sedentary.  

 

THEN, as you start to deplete your reserves, the cortisol kicks in to try and "keep you alive" while you are threatening the system.  

 

You may not think you are threatening the system - but your nervous system does.  You may think that pushing through it will help get you more endorphins, more fit - but if your cortisol keeps firing, you are only depleting your reserves, sending your system deeper into dysregulation and likely slowing your healing rather than helping.

 

I would suggest pushing for maybe a minute or two more.  But no longer.  Then, I would recommend taking off your shoes and standing in the cool grass and "letting go" (popularly called "grounding" by Mercola and friends) to help settle the cortisol.

 

I also strongly recommend magnesium bath after anything strenuous - whether that is a long day at work, or even a family picnic can be overwhelmingly active, just standing and talking can be stressful on the system.  

 

Lastly, I have to praise Bubble's statement that not all walks are created equal.  The healing power of nature is the essence of nurture. In my little 10 minute walks, I watch birds, the angle of the sun, the changes in the trees and flowers, and the native human wildlife, too.  And these nourish me, as well as the sun and the walk do.

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MissTrish

I really appreciate reading this today.  I have been regularly (twice a week) going to a Zumba Gold class.  The gold means it's less intensive, more geared toward seniors.  It's not difficult for me; I've been doing it for nearly two years now.  I had been wondering whether or not to quit going.

 

From what I read that you wrote it seems that it might be okay to keep going.  I had not thought of adding magnesium in after the fact.  I will try that.

 

What are your thoughts on yoga and w/d?

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freespirit

I really appreciate reading this today.  I have been regularly (twice a week) going to a Zumba Gold class.  The gold means it's less intensive, more geared toward seniors.  It's not difficult for me; I've been doing it for nearly two years now.  I had been wondering whether or not to quit going.

 

From what I read that you wrote it seems that it might be okay to keep going.  I had not thought of adding magnesium in after the fact.  I will try that.

 

What are your thoughts on yoga and w/d?

What was making you think about quitting going? Feeling not so great afterwards?

 

Magnesium baths haven't been helping much lately, so I'm back to using lavender instead. That seems to be useful in helping to relax my muscles and in settling my nervous system.

 

I agree with JanCarol on both the importance of regular exercise, as well as the significance of the setting. Even a 10-15 minute gentle walk almost always makes me feel better afterwards and I only walk outside. I too, put a lot of focus on taking in what's around me and not on using it as a time to power through things. Sometimes, I listen to music while walking..as it seems to help my mind to focus more and can keep me out of negative thinking.

 

One thing I'm noticing recently is that my body temp has a lot to do with how I feel physically during and after exercise. I've taken to running a fan in the room where I ride my exercise bike..and am walking early in the am or later in the evening, when it's cooler. That seems to be helping to keep me me feeling a bit more balances.

 

Also, I'm currently taking a break from the swimming pool. While the swimming itself is beneficial and not too stimulating, I'm struggling with other aspects of being there. It's hard these days to find a time where the pool isn't crowded. My nervous system does not do well with dodging multiple people swimming in the same lane, nor the noise of screaming kids. Last time I was there, someone ran into me from behind. While that would be irritating under normal circumstances, this time, it sent me into a rage. I very quickly got out of the pool and came home. I'm feeling too emotionally fragile right now to contend with these things...so it's walking and biking for right now. I can't even imagine trying a gym or a class right now...both would feel like too much I think.

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MissTrish

>>What was making you think about quitting going? Feeling not so great afterwards?<<

 

 

 

I do zumba right before lunch and about the time dinner rolls around my muscles are all tight and bound up and that makes it hard for to relax, physically or mentally.  I bought some magnesium citrate and on Friday I took a small swig of that (don't want to take too much!) and I didn't really notice a difference - I wasn't wound up but then I'm not always.  I hesitate to give this class up because I always feel so much better mentally from the movement and the light socializing.

 

Yesterday morning I did some kundalini yoga with a small group of friends.  I've never done that before; it involved much more intensive breathing than I was used to.  Consequently I dozed on and off all afternoon, which was nice!  Had a bit more of a restless night but that could have been because of the dozing.

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Narcissus

Very nice summation, JanCarol.  

I feel like I'm eating those words I wrote on exercise last year.  Exerting myself seems to cause, by and large, negative reactions.  Those of us in extended withdrawal have to learn to resist the normally healthy impulse to push ourselves harder while exercising. It's been two and a half years and I'm still not able to do this.  Talk about a steep learning curve.  

 

The author of CFS Unravelled has some useful things to say about exercise, I'll see if I can find it.  

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freespirit

 

>>What was making you think about quitting going? Feeling not so great afterwards?<<

 

 

 

I do zumba right before lunch and about the time dinner rolls around my muscles are all tight and bound up and that makes it hard for to relax, physically or mentally.  I bought some magnesium citrate and on Friday I took a small swig of that (don't want to take too much!) and I didn't really notice a difference - I wasn't wound up but then I'm not always.  I hesitate to give this class up because I always feel so much better mentally from the movement and the light socializing.

 

Yesterday morning I did some kundalini yoga with a small group of friends.  I've never done that before; it involved much more intensive breathing than I was used to.  Consequently I dozed on and off all afternoon, which was nice!  Had a bit more of a restless night but that could have been because of the dozing.

 

 

It's a challenge weighing everything out. Sometimes, a bit of physical discomfort can be worth it, when there's some greater benefit on the other side. This process can be so isolating, so there's a lot to be said for something a bit social..as well as benefits from the movement.

 

Have you used magnesium oil for sore muscles? I sometime use arnica, traumeel, or calms forte. The difference isn't dramatic, but they generally help somewhat. I haven't yet had a problem with any of those.

 

The yoga sounds good. Deep breathing can be helpful..as long as like anything, it isn't too intense. qi gong involves a lot of slower, deeper breathing...I find it really helps me.

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AppleOfSodom

I've just realized I have extreme muscle weakness for 24 hours after lifting weights or even just doing some push-ups.

I did some push-ups yesterday and today I can't even do one. It's ridiculous. Anyone has the same problem?

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DLB

Oh yeah, and i get sore really easy. I have what feels like lactic acid buildup at times but that has lessened.

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bruno2016

I have been off the poisonous drugs for 3.5 years and over the past couple years have really gotten into exercise, fitness, and nutrition. I recently completed a fitness trainer certification as well.

 

In my case, i did notice post exercise weakness and when this would happen i needed to back of and rest. I am now at the advanced level of training where i workout 4 days a week and have cycles. The past few weeks i have been focusing on endurance exercises and have been having some malaise and so i think part of the problem is the exercise. I believe that the drugs cause widespread changes and disruptions in our musculoskeletal system (and all systems) and that is one reason some of us have this weakness after exercise. I think it is part of wd/ssri use.

 

I can recommend some ways to help: make certain you have a good diet with many easily digestable foods (raw green juices, soups, slow cooked meats), a quality whey protein post workout (grass fed source), whole foods multi vitamin, liquid trace mineral, glutamine, and branched train amimos. Likewise, make certain your rest time is sufficient; drink plenty of water and coconut water.

 

The idea is to provide your muscles with all the nutrients necessary for growth and repair while also giving them time to repair by resting. If at all possible, add some massage therapy.

 

Lastly, add some natural anti inflammatories and antioxidants. I like using vitamim c, tumeric, and ginger. Noni juice is also great.

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Iamfine

I have found exercise to be very helpful. I was very athletic before I got ill, but after I started quitting all the drugs two years ago I was either in bed or on the couch nearly 24 hours a day. About 4 months ago I started running again. Ridiculously low mileage at first but I have worked my way up to running/walking 45 minutes, every other day. It's painful but it's a good pain. I always feel better for hours after a workout, and I especially feel good during.

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bluebalu86

I think it makes sense that exercise would be good for the brain and normalizing nervous system functioning. For now I can only do walks though, sometimes walking for hours at a time, but no running or anything too strenuous. 

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Iamfine

Walking is great exercise. A real runner would laugh at what I call running though.

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freespirit

I agree that walking is excellent exercise. Doing whatever you are able to do is enough...no matter what anyone else thinks of it. When I got my indoor exercise bike, I started out riding five to ten minutes 3x week. I've had to go a whole lot slower and exercise much less than I'd like to. Every day is different too...where I can do more or a bit more intensity on some days, but not others. I think as long as you are able and it doesn't exacerbate anything, doing any amount of exercise is a good thing.

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JanCarol

Miss Trish asks:

 

 

What are your thoughts on yoga and w/d?

 

I love yoga, and I recommend it for withdrawal.  

 

However, I do not recommend Bikram, Power Yoga, or intense cardio yoga of any sort - same problem as with other cardio forms of exercise.

 

I love yoga, I'm addicted to yoga, it is so freeing.  That said, I'm older than I used to be, and I have to be careful not to hurt myself.  Additionally, I find that Aussie yoga teachers are much more reckless and less correcting than what I am used to.  I encourage people to find someone who is hands on, who will roll your legs or open your shoulders, or hang you from a strap to get the correct alignment.  Aussie yoga teachers have straps and blocks, but don't know how to use them to make correct alignment.  Fortunately, I have decades of experience and can correct myself.  But I sure would love to have someone to help me, like I used to get in the USA.

 

There are a lot of articles about yoga on SA and BeyondMeds, and a number of them include videos to try.

Morning Yoga for the Challenged Nervous System

Gentle yoga for calming

For starters.

 

Miss Trish, again, talks about kundalini:

 

 

Yesterday morning I did some kundalini yoga with a small group of friends.  I've never done that before; it involved much more intensive breathing than I was used to.  Consequently I dozed on and off all afternoon, which was nice!  Had a bit more of a restless night but that could have been because of the dozing.

 

Kundalini, I would not encourage.  The very purpose of kundalini is to induce and create  altered states.  That is not something that someone in withdrawal would want.   It might be fine for someone healthy and well adjusted, to try and expand their consciousness, awareness, and induce spiritual growth.  However, there are a number of people who are here in SA because of induced "spiritual emergencies," whether by this type of practice, or through recreational drugs, and these "spiritual emergencies" sent them to hospital and got them drugged.  Additionally, kundalini can be easily used to control another's energy.  There are a lot of predators in the kundalini business.  

 

Start with hatha yoga, and then pranayama - when you have become more versed in chakras and balance, consider kundalini - but be sensitive to the energy of the instructor / teacher.  If it feels like you are "worshipping something," or if something feels "weird,"  I would back away from it.  My understanding of kundalini is very different to what is being taught in these pumping breathing, driving, explosive classes.  I was taught a great deal more care, when seeking to open chakras and spin energy through them.  They seem reckless to me.

 

 Pranayama (just learning about breathing) is better, more meditative, kundalini is more forceful, and can be dizzy-making and is probably dysregulating.  If, however, you find it is making you better, who am I to say otherwise?

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JanCarol

I did find what I consider a pretty ideal exercise for withdrawal.

 

As a former athlete, I used to scoff at this, thinking, "that's not real exercise!"

 

It's powered toning tables and chairs.  It is $15-20 per session, of course the price goes down if you want more.  It takes about 45 minutes, it's like circuit training, except it is not weightlifting.  Each machine moves you in different positions, and you can make it harder by doing it slower, by engaging your core, and by resisting/flexing into each movement.

 

It wasn't enough to feel like a "good workout" - but it was moving, it was safe, and the environment of the studio is very pleasant.  EVERYONE in there says "hi" to me when I go, the music is gentle 70's & 80's mix from Spotify.  You don't need special clothes.  You don't sweat or get your heart rate up.  It takes you through various movements.  It's very good for someone with injury, or fatigue, or withdrawal.

 

The studios are very popular in the UK, and they are coming to the US and Australia.  We have about a half-dozen studios across the country - one is 10 minutes from my house, another is more like 25 minutes from my house (new opening) and there's another on the Southwest side, at Sunnybank.

 

Try searching "toning tables" or "shapemaster studio" to see if there is one near you.

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Juventus17

Are you kidding me? Something that's supposed to be a natural treatment for anxiety and depression could make SSRI withdrawal worse? What am I supposed to do? Sit on the couch all day suffering and letting my body deteriorate?

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JanCarol

"Natural treatments" for anxiety and depression are not the same as treatments for withdrawal.

 

This goes for supplements, and intense practices.  Even pranayama, when taken to extremes (like Art of Living / AOL), can send you off the charts.

 

Think, gentle.  Safe.  We are conditioned in Western society to push and strive - but I think that's why we get sick to begin with.  It's not balanced with rest and care and nurturing.  

 

Choose practices which are gentle, nurturing, safe.  You can push and strive LATER, when you are better.  

 

YES, exercise is AWESOME for depression and anxiety and anger and wild mood swings.  AWESOME.  But when you are dysregulated, in withdrawal, those same things can make your symptoms WORSE, and slow your healing down.

 

YES, you can exercise in withdrawal.  Just don't push it.  Just do what feels good, and if you find you crash, or pay a price for that exercise for more than a day - then you have done too much.  At least, that's the guide I use.  If I'm still having trouble 2-3 days out, either I skipped the magnesium bath, or I did too much.  So next time, I do less, or I do it more gently.  Sometimes I take a heart-rate monitor to yoga class to make sure that the up/down/up/down postural hypotension doesn't set me off.  But I still go to yoga!

 

Your body (not me) is your best guide to what is right for you.  I posted what I posted here as a caution - so that you don't beat yourself up if it turns out to be too much, as is often the case.  Even Ten, the ex-marathon heavy-weightlifting guy, is finding that he cannot push himself while in withdrawal.  So many of us have had to pull back, and rest.

 

It takes a LOT of energy to heal a brain.  There may not be enough left over for intense exercise.  But by all means, keep moving - just make it gentle, easy-going.  Find out what your limits are, and listen to your body.

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Marta

I agree exercise is great but yes one has to be careful on your choice! For example I have a treadmill at home but long runs make me feel worse now...I just walk on it when outside is raining. By the way I have also days in which I WON'T exercise -_-  in the future I'll try yoga...a lot of people say that is great

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MissTrish

I am two weeks post taper completion.  I had a beautiful window on Thursday.  I'd had a bad 24 hours, then made myself go to my gentle yoga class.  It was tough (for me - it's an easy class but I felt physically sick and wasn't sure I could even finish the class.)  But by the time it was over, I felt my mood lift, my anxiety go away and I felt great for over a day.  However, next morning I decided on a 10 minute walk.  I had been doing senior zumba twice a week, so thought I would be good to myself by reducing my load, since physically I really don't feel so hot.  I knew I could push myself through it but wasn't sure that was a good idea.  I last did zumba on Monday, and had a horrible night.  No sleep at all.

 

But anyway last night the anxiety had started creeping back in.  I walked again this morning (10 minutes) and boy this afternoon I feel buzzed, and not in a good way.  Does not bode well for tonight's sleep.  I'm also, btw, doing 20 minutes of very gentle yoga, in the afternoons.

 

I'm wondering if I need to not walk 10 minutes a day, if the cortisol spikes are what's adding to the anxiety.  I hate that; I've been more physically active than ever before in my life this past year and I know my overall health has improved tremendously.  Now I'm losing it.

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