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KarenB

Anatomy of an Epidemic: What impacted me.

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KarenB

Things I underlined in my copy of Anatomy of an Epidemic, by Robert  Whittaker.  (I’ve added bold here for emphasis). 

 

‘Now there may be a number of social factors contributing to the epidemic.  Our society may be organised in a way today that leads to a greater degree of stress and emotional turmoil.  For instance, we may lack the close-knit neighbourhoods that help people stay well.’ P. 208

 

 

‘…over the course of the next 30 years, researchers determined that the drugs work by perturbing the normal functioning of the neuronal pathways in the brain.  In response the brain undergoes ‘compensatory adaptions’ to cope with the drug’s mucking up of its messaging system, and this leaves the brain functioning in an ‘abnormal’ manner.  Rather than fix chemical imbalances in the brain, the drugs create them.’ P.207

 

 

‘”I do wonder what might have happened if [at age sixteen] I [a woman] could have just talked to someone, and they could have helped me learn about what I could do on my own to be a healthy person. … my eating problems, and my diet and exercise, and … how to take care of myself.  Instead, it was you have this problem with your neurotransmitters … take this pill Zoloft, and when that didn’t work, it was take this pill Prozac, and when that didn’t work, it was take this pill Effexor, and then when I started having trouble sleeping, it was take this sleeping pill,” she says, her voice sounding more wistful than ever.  “I am so tired of the pills.”’ P.171

 

 

‘A study conducted by the World Health Organisation … [found it was those] who weren’t exposed to psychotropic medications (whether diagnosed or not) that had the best outcomes.  They enjoyed much better ‘general health’ at the end of one year, their depressive symptoms were much milder, and a lower percentage were judged to still be ‘mentally’ ill.  The group that suffered most from ‘continued depression’ were the patients treated with an antidepressant.’ P. 165

 

 

‘“I thought that sincere human involvement and understanding were critical to healing interactions,” he [Loren Mosher, schizophrenia doctor] said.  “The idea was to treat people as people, as human beings, with dignity and respect.”’ P.102

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btdt

An amazing book..the truth can be so refreshing. :)

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Happy2Heal

sad that you even have to have a policy of "treating people like people"

 

it's like the old anti stigma ads that came out in the 80s I think:

How do you treat a person with a mental illness?
Like a person.

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KarenB

And sad that most institutions don't even seem to think of this, except for in lip-service on glossy brochures.  I guess most decisions are easier if you don't view people as people.  

 

I remember when I was a teenager and first heard the phrase 'human resources' that companies use.  It revolted me that people were segmented down to that - a resource for a company. 

 

One thing I loved about AOAE was it's stories of those who cared for people with a human-to-human response.  As opposed to professional-to-patient.  Or supplier-to-buyer.  There is scary stuff in the book, for sure, but also such immense human kindness.  That's what I look to, and it's what guides my healing. 

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anonymous4317

An amazing book..the truth can be so refreshing. :)

 

Agreed. I hope the truth eventually comes out to the majority of people. I had never heard of the MindFreedom Six until I read this book. 

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