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IBM gets 215 million patient profiles


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http://www.infoworld.com/article/3034609/analytics/ibm-gets-215-million-patient-profiles-in-26-billion-analytics-firm-buy.html

 

IBM has championed Watson Health as a tool to bring high-quality health-care to remote areas, to match patients to clinical trials, and to give health researchers access to massive data sets.

"Lots of the future of progress in healthcare lies in this analytics area," O'Daffer said. "The ability to take data that intersects multiple systems ... and the ability to synthesize that data in a meaningful way to make better decisions is really the key to the next phase of progress."

 

From what I understand of this from reading over the years these companies are a great source of info for pharma data mining it is called they sell your info and your docs prescribing history to pharma according to some books I have read.

Odd thing is they always make it sound like this will help us in some way while I am sure it just helps us be more easily manipulated so we are exactly where big money wants us.

you don't need to say it I know I am jaded.

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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Bit more on data mining from me lol practically computer illiterate lol  :P  :P so here is a face to go with it... cause I can read and have common sense but computers... bit of an mystery to me still.

 

http://www.statnews.com/2015/12/15/insurance-big-data/

 

Health insurers are scooping up huge quantities of personal information in a bid to figure out when you’re likely to get sick — and to design interventions to keep you healthy.

Insurance companies have always had access to your medical records, and in some cases your genetic data, too. Now, they’re paying data miners to sift through information on everything from what model car you drive to how many hours you sleep, from which magazines you read to where you shop and what you buy.

 

Shopping at home-improvement stores, for instance, turns out to be a great predictor of mental health. If you suddenly stop shopping at Lowe’s, your insurance company may suspect that you’re depressed, Greenspun said.

And if you drive a foreign-made car, you’re more likely to lose your eligibility for Medicaid in the coming year, according to Chris Coloian, president of Predilytics, a Massachusetts health-care data analytics company recently acquired by the firm Welltok.

Privacy concerns

Privacy advocates worry that insurers are using all this highly personal, often sensitive information without informed consent and with little transparency or accountability.

Long before Big Data, of course, health insurers made decisions about which patients to prioritize. But using an algorithm to determine how and when to intervene raises troubling risks, said Kirsten Martin, an assistant professor at George Washington University who studies business ethics and Big Data.

If an insurer writes off groups of patients as “not worth the time of a nurse … certain people are going to become sicker and certain people are going to get well,” Martin said. “You have a problem if all of a sudden you’re only using the nurses on certain groups.”

Health insurers say they don’t deny care to anyone based on algorithms; they just use the data to customize the approach to each patient.

Leading the Big Data revolution

Entrepreneurs like Colin Hill are leading this Big Data revolution.

Fifteen years ago, as a young Cornell physics graduate student, Hill got swept up in the excitement around the Human Genome Project. He and a fellow physics graduate student started a company that aimed to harness the promise of all that new data.

For nearly a decade, GNS Healthcare worked mostly with pharmaceutical companies, mining genomic and lab test data to help discover drugs and evaluate them. But the firm, based in Cambridge, Mass., has since expanded its focus.

 

Now, for a given project, GNS culls through millions of medical records, trillions of data points of genetic information, and a huge amount of consumer spending data, using artificial intelligence and machine learning to help companies, hospitals, and insurers figure out how to handle specific patients.

GNS helped the insurance giant Aetna predict which of about 37,000 policyholders were most at risk of developing metabolic syndrome or seeing their condition worsen within a year, using an analysis that took into account demographic variables including ethnicity, cigarette usage, and nightly hours of sleep. Those results helped inform Aetna’s experiment with personalized corporate wellness programs, which included sending members customized vitamin supplements and staging weight-loss contests, among other interventions.

The algorithm, he said, can tell the insurer not to waste time and money trying to get certain patients to take their pills — but to spend resources on other patients instead.

A 6-year-old smoker?

Of course, such analyses are only as good as the underlying data and the algorithm used to mine it. And even advocates of the practice have concerns about the accuracy of some of the personal information they use.

“If you’ve got unreliable data, you’re going to make unreliable decisions,” said Dr. Doug Fridsma, president of the American Medical Informatics Association

For health insurers, Greenspun said, “the real struggle right now is trying to figure out what’s real, what’s not real, where can they get [data], and how much they can trust this.”

 
 

I cherry picked this long article to see it all go to the link. 

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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