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Antipsychotic survivors? Interested in your stories.

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Staz

Living proof that listening to your body is paramount and not getting hung up on percentages or sxs's. Thanks for posting.

Steve

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apathetic

I am getting closer and closer to writing my success story, as time passes.

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I personally don't think there is a big of a difference between recovery from antipsychotics, antidepressants or any other drug (that you are physically addicted to, let's call it that way). Everyone's symptoms are different, so the duration of recovery is different. It depends on many factors. But we are all suffering from one same thing - withdrawal syndrome. There are only variations of symptoms we experience, but many of our symptoms are the same. I think the reason why there aren't as many success stories as there are for antidepressants is because the number of people who are taking ADs is huge compared to number of people who are taking APs.

Well, I am getting better, and my withdrawal started when I got cold-turkey off antipsychotic.
The ability to think clearly, logically and make sense of things is back and it's even better than it was before WDS, the ability to feel, experience pleasant feelings, enjoy life when I can, eat normally, sleep normally and not be under severe stress. What I still struggle with is dissociation, but that is also much, much better than it was and it's a result of my childhood traumas that I am trying to resolve with my current therapist (as a tool we are NOT using medications, only psychotherapy).

And yes, I am able to tell people I love that I love them and really feel it inside, not only rationally know that I do so, which is a major improvement for me, besides everything.

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Iatrogenesis
On 4/18/2018 at 1:32 AM, apathetic said:

I am getting closer and closer to writing my success story, as time passes.

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I personally don't think there is a big of a difference between recovery from antipsychotics, antidepressants or any other drug (that you are physically addicted to, let's call it that way). Everyone's symptoms are different, so the duration of recovery is different. It depends on many factors. But we are all suffering from one same thing - withdrawal syndrome. There are only variations of symptoms we experience, but many of our symptoms are the same. I think the reason why there aren't as many success stories as there are for antidepressants is because the number of people who are taking ADs is huge compared to number of people who are taking APs.

 

In Europe, perhaps, although I'm not sure it's a HUGE difference.

In America though:

 

https://www.alternet.org/most-popular-drug-america-antipsychotic-and-no-one-really-knows-how-it-works

Abilify was the most popular drug of 2014. This is all because antipsychotics are being prescribed for an increasing number of diseases/disorders/what have you.

 

If there aren't as many success stories (I guess you mean in general, on the Internet), then it's perhaps because fewer people are aware of APs causing WD as well. This could have something to do with this multi-million pound class action lawsuit:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/gsk-facing-uk-lawsuit-over-anti-depressant-755776.html

And the previous action against Glaxo

 

Quote

 

Following complaints from patients, GSK agreed last

summer to remove from the patient information leaflet an assertion that the drug is not addictive.

 

 

The lawsuits leveled against APs seem to be more concerned with some extremely disabling symptoms, diabetes, things like that.

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