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Crocus

Folic acid, folate, L-methylfolate, and Deplin (vitamin B9)

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Crocus

I wanted to put this out here as I had a prescribing nurse suggest this "drug": http://www.deplin.com/

 

I do not know if I understand this correctly, but he said I would have to pay $500. for a genetic test and "if I have the right gene" then I could be prescribed Deplin. It is a B vitamin (folic acid) and the pharmaceutical company altered it enough so they could take out a patent on it.

 

He said the basic dose started at about $80. per month. He was suggesting I try this as an adjunct not as anything to help me wean.

 

A little more background on this. This is the guy who put me on Effexor, Trileptal, Klonopin and Lamictal. So, what was I doing talking with him as opposed to spitting on his shoes? Well, I could only get Effexor tablets from the Kaiser formulary. I needed a Dr to give me an Rx for Effexor capsules, which he did. I figured that if he did not, I would tell him that it is all I can do to keep my husband from filing a lawsuit against him, which is true.

 

So, I made nice,took his bill with me which at some point I will return unpaid with a letter explaining my thoughts on what he does. I brought the brochure for this home and threw it away.

 

So, know that Bigpharma is not beyond looking at our wonderful nutrients and (like Monsanto) trying to figure out how to own them. By the way, the Effexor costs $134. a month at Costco. I had to get it through a reputable Canadian pharmacy for $55. I got lucky and Kaiser sent a letter shortly after saying they were discontinuing the Effexor XR tabs and going to a capsule which is what I now use to wean.

 

Alto - if this is not appropriate here or came out of my brain in too disjointed a manner - please move or remove. I just wanted to mention it. I will look into it more on Monday.

 

Crocus

Edited by Altostrata
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Altostrata

The DIY forum is for rants, editorials, and opinions. Spitting and other expressions of outrage are encouraged.

 

Yeah, there was a study a few years back, probably done by Deplin's manufacturer, showing this variety of folate to be helpful as an adjunct therapy for depression. Surprise, psychiatrists were recommending it right and left.

 

There's a genetic mutation causing difficulty in absorbing ordinary folate supplements. It's related to heart problems. I'm supposed to have this, so I know more than anyone should about it. There have been alternative absorbable folates (l-methylfolate) available for a long time, Metafolin is one of them. It's much more expensive than dirt-cheap regular folate, but a LOT less expensive than Deplin.

 

You can order it yourself on the Web, no prescription needed. (This FDA approval for Deplin makes me suspect it's another Medicare fraud, like Immunocal, which is just whey protein isolate. Medicare then pays top dollar for ordinary supplements.)

 

It makes sense that someone with a folate deficiency, which affects B12 as well, would feel a lot better mentally and physically with proper folate supplementation. These people may have been misdiagnosed with a mental disorder from the very first, and been on psychiatric drugs for years while their vitamin deficiency was neglected. Just goes to show how gullible psychiatrists are!

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Altostrata

I'm going to move this to Symptoms and What Helps -- people may wish to try L-methylfolate supplementation for symptoms.

 

It's a disgrace that psychiatry may be treating folate deficiency with antidepressants, then claim folate works as an "add-on" treatment. Folate deficiency via MTHFR genetic variation should be a differential diagnosis.

 

But that's only one of the many disgraces of the profession.

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Crocus

You are so right Alto. And if we were to do a "disgraces of the psychiatric profession" thread it would be a very long one I think.

 

I wish I had a buck for every time I have heard a Dr. say that "nutrients don't do anything, or just give you expensive yellow urine..." But, my bad, this is a "medical food".... (wtf?)

 

I did begin adding folate to my diet after this and felt that it helped (discussed with my Naturopath) but I am going to continue to keep the Deplin website as a reminder of how little they (APA and bigpharma)know and yet even though they disparage the professions of alternative healthcare they are also willing to try to steal the knowledge of those they scoff at.

 

I guess I should have put a WARNING: looking at the Deplin website may cause nausea in some people. Perhaps a cup of ginger tea while reading it will help. [big grin!] Crocus

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bruno2016

I wanted to put this out here as I had a prescribing nurse suggest this "drug":

 

http://www.deplin.com/

 

I do not know if I understand this correctly, but he said I would have to pay $500. for a genetic test and "if I have the right gene" then I could be prescribed Deplin. It is a B vitamin (folic acid) and the pharmaceutical company altered it enough so they could take out a patent on it. He said the basic dose started at about $80. per month. He was suggesting I try this as an adjunct not as anything to help me wean.

 

A little more background on this. This is the guy who put me on Effexor, Trileptal, Klonopin and Lamictal. So, what was I doing talking with him as opposed to spitting on his shoes? Well, I could only get Effexor tablets from the Kaiser formulary. I needed a Dr to give me an Rx for Effexor capsules, which he did. I figured that if he did not, I would tell him that it is all I can do to keep my husband from filing a lawsuit against him, which is true. So, I made nice,took his bill with me which at some point I will return unpaid with a letter explaining my thoughts on what he does.

 

I brought the brochure for this home and threw it away. So, know that Bigpharma is not beyond looking at our wonderful nutrients and (like Monsanto) trying to figure out how to own them.

 

By the way, the Effexor costs $134. a month at Costco. I had to get it through a reputable Canadian pharmacy for $55. I got lucky and Kaiser sent a letter shortly after saying they were discontinuing the Effexor XR tabs and going to a capsule which is what I now use to wean.

 

Alto - if this is not appropriate here or came out of my brain in too disjointed a manner - please move or remove. I just wanted to mention it. I will look into it more on Monday.

 

Crocus

 

I recently tried something similar to deplin called cerefolinNAC which is basically the same thing except it has NAC in it. Well that that stuff made me unable to sleep and increased my impulsiveness a bit. I did not like it, but I did feel my brain was a little more clear.

 

You mentioned effexor through a canadian pharmacy and this brought back horrible memories. I was paying out of pocket when on this drug and so did the canadian pharmacy thing. I do not remember exactly which pharmacy it was (but can find out if anyone wants to know), but right before effexor became generic in the USA, they were already offering it in canada. So i found a generic of effexor from that pharmacy and it turns out it came from india, bad decision. The day I started it I began having joint pain. It got so bad that my jaw and right knee actually locked up. Went to the doc, they did not find anything. Sent my info to medwatch and mailed some of my pills to the FDA and they supposedly tested them for heavy metals and there were none. I still suffer from time to time from the joint pain. Interestingly enough, since I recently got of AD, while I was going off the joint pain came back. I do not know what the hell was in that stuff but I am working to get it out. ANyone ever done a heavy metals test?

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Altostrata

Yes, the B vitamins, even folate, can be stimulating to sensitive nervous systems.

 

Zepp, it sounds like there may not have been enough Effexor in those tablets from India. You experienced withdrawal then, you're experiencing it now. May have been heavy metals as well, but I would suspect the drug was diluted.

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Crocus

Zepplin;

 

I am glad you posted about your Canadian pharmacy experience here. I may have gotten lucky - I spent a tad more for what was supposed to be genuine Wyeth Effexor and had no problem. Now, I am on a generic that I get in the U.S.

 

I also wanted to tell you that my naturopath did look at my blood and told me I had metal toxicity and I have been having ongoing dental work to remove all the metal sources in my mouth. Apparently, some people can have metals in their dental work and show no problem from it, but that was not the case for me.

 

I have been feeling better (less fatigue) since I had one new crown, but in addition the Dr found bacteria in my blood from decay, so I am not certain if it was the metal, the bacteria or both.

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Altostrata

Metafolin, Metagenics FolaPro, or the outrageously overpriced prescription Deplin are all l-5-methyl tetrahydrofolate or MTHF, folate alternatives for people who cannot metabolize the usual form of folic acid in supplements.

 

There is no reason to take one of these relatively expensive folate alternative if you don't have the MTHF mutation.

 

There is a test that checks for the MTHFR gene mutation causing poor absorption of ordinary folate.

 

The MTHFR mutation (there are several variations) is associated with a number of health conditions other than psychiatric, see http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/MTHFR and may also cause vitamin B12 deficiency http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/293/1/H860.full

 

Taking a folate supplement in the form of L-Methylfolate and sublingual B12 or shots alleviates the risk caused by an MTHFR mutation.

 

There are many manufacturers offering L-Methylfolate supplements. An early one was called Metafolin. They are somewhat more expensive than ordinary folate supplements, which are very cheap -- but they are a lot less expensive than Deplin.

 

Recently, psychiatry jumped on the L-Methylfolate bandwagon with a study paid for by the manufacturer of Deplin, another L-Methylfolate supplement (discussion above). The authors trumpeted improvement in their patients as a huge success, when they should have been deeply ashamed of misdiagnosing and treating them with antidepressants rather than L-Methylfolate for years.

 

This paper caused a fad among doctors of prescribing exorbitantly overpriced brand-name Deplin L-Methylfolate for depression.

 

However, in my opinion, this is another reprehensible example of psychiatry mistaking a medical condition for a psychiatric condition. Depression may be a symptom of low folate or vitamin B12; this condition does not deserve a psychiatric diagnosis. Everyone with "depression" should first be tested for deficiencies of this sort and recommended the appropriate supplements rather than psychiatric drugs.

 

If you really, really want to take L-Methylfolate, here are versions that are less expensive than overpriced prescription Deplin:

 

- Metafolin (from various manufacturers)

- Metagenics FolaPro

- Life Extension Optimized Folate (l-methylfolate)

- Source Naturals MegaFolinic

- Thorne Research 5-MTHF (5-Methyltetrahydrofolate)

 

etc.

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Altostrata

More info about L-methylfolate. CNSSpectrum and Stephen Stahl are both heavily supported by pharma.

 

http://www.cnsspectrums.com/aspx/articledetail.aspx?articleid=1267

 

Novel Therapeutics for Depression: L-methylfolate as a Trimonoamine Modulator and Antidepressant-Augmenting Agent

Stephen M. Stahl, MD, PhD

 

CNS Spectr. 2007;12(10):739-744

Dr. Stahl is adjunct professor of psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California-San Diego in La Jolla.

 

Disclosures: Dr. Stahl receives grant/research support from AstraZeneca, Biovail, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cephalon, Cyberonics, Eli Lilly, Forest, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, Neurocrine Bioscience, Organon, Pfizer, Sepracor, Shire, Somaxon, and Wyeth; is a consultant to Acadia, Amylin, Asahi, AstraZeneca, Biolaunch, Biovail, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cephalon, CSC Pharma, Cyberonics, Cypress Bioscience, Eli Lilly, Epix, Fabre Kramer, Forest, GlaxoSmithKline, Jazz, Neurocrine Bioscience, Neuromolecular, Neuronetics, Nova Del Pharma, Novartis, Organon, Otsuka, PamLab, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre, Sanofi Synthelabo, Schering Plough, Sepracor, Shire, Solvay, Somaxon, Takeda, Tetragenix, and Wyeth; and is on the speaker’s bureau of Pfizer.

 

If you would like to comment on this column or submit a suggestion to Dr. Stahl for future columns, please e-mail vj@mblcommunications.com.

 

....

Why L-methylfolate Rather Than Folic Acid for Depression?

 

Folate is one of the 13 essential vitamins. Dihydrofolate, a mixture of

polyglutamates (ie, a number of glutamatic acid entities) is the form of

folate obtained from dietary intake of green vegetables, yeast, liver,

kidney, and egg yolk. Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate

contained in over-the-counter vitamin supplements (usually mixed with

several other vitamins and nutrients and present in low doses). Folic

acid is also the synthetic form of folate contained in prescriptions

written by a licensed practitioner in higher doses for medical use.

 

Dihydrofolate and folic acid are converted to monoglutamate entites by

the enzyme alpha-L-glutamyl transferase in the intestinal wall as they

are absorbed.47 Once absorbed, monoglutamate entities are converted to

MTHF, the form of folate that passes into the brain and is utilized by

trimonoamine neurons to facilitate neurotransmitter synthesis (Figures 1

and 4B). Normally, ingesting folate from dihydrofolate in the diet or

from folic acid in synthetic supplements will result in adequate

delivery of MTHF levels to the brain, especially in those individuals

with the more efficient genotype (C677C) producing up to 100% of the

enzyme methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase and who do not have

depression.

 

However, robust levels of MTHF in the brain, which may be necessary to

maximize the chances of boosting trimonoamine neurotransmitter synthesis

(Figures 2–4), are more likely attained after administration of MTHF

rather than folic acid (Figure 4B). Thus, administration of MTHF may

have significant advantages over administration of folic acid as a TMM

to augment antidepressants in depressed patients who do not respond

adequately to their antidepressant treatment. Such patients may or may

not be folate deficient, may or may not have the inefficient form of the

genotype (C677T, T677T) producing 35% to 71% of the MTHF enzyme, and may

or may not be taking various anticonvulsant mood stabilizers that

interfere with folic acid absorption or MTHF formation, such as

lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and others (Figure 4B). Further research is

needed to identify those depressed patients most likely to respond to

MTHF augmentation, including studies of both unipolar and bipolar

depression.

 

In terms of what is known about treatment with folic acid versus MTHF,

it may take as much as 7 mg of oral folic acid to generate the same

plasma levels of MTHF as giving 1 mg of oral MTHF.49 How much folic acid

is this? The recommended daily allowance of folic acid from food or

dietary supplements is 0.4 mg (0.8 mg for pregnant women);

over-the-counter multivitamin supplements typically provide between 0.25

and 1 mg of folic acid; normal "prescription strength" folic

acid is 1 mg pure folic acid; high-dose prescription folic acid for

treating pregnant women to reduce the risk of neural tube defects is

between 4 mg and 5 mg. By comparison, the lowest dose of MTHF studied in

depression to augment antidepressant treatment is 7.5 mg, roughly

equivalent to 52 mg of folic acid.32 Although high doses of folic acid

can be administered orally, the precursors of MTHF may compete with MTHF

for entry into brain by binding to folate transport receptors, limiting

the amount of MTHF that can enter the brain (Figure 4B).50-52 Thus, high

doses of MTHF are likely to provide substantially more active MTHF

moiety to the brain than high doses of folic acid. The exact dose of

MTHF to treat depression is not fully determined, but since MTHF works

indirectly to boost monoamine synthesis, high doses are likely to be

necessary to optimize this action.

 

Additionally, high doses of MTHF may be more appropriate than high doses

of folic acid because MTHF is less likely to mask a vitamin B12

deficiency.53-55 That is, when folic acid is administered, it can be

metabolized and utilized for DNA biosynthesis even in vitamin B12

deficient cells, thus masking the anemia from a vitamin B12 deficiency.

B12 deficiency decreases the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe),

which activates the enzyme MTHF reductase and this traps MTHF away from

DNA synthesis, making it unlikely that the administration of MTHF will

mask an anemia.

 

....

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Tom

 

 

 

The MTHFR mutation (there are several variations) is associated with a number of health conditions other than psychiatric, see http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/MTHFR and may also cause vitamin B12 deficiency http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/293/1/H860.full

 

 

 

 

 

That's interesting Alto that it also can cause a B12 deficiency. When I was tested last year, I was low in B12, Folate, and D. I do happen to have some Metafolin, but I haven't done very well with vitamins, particularly the Bs, so I've hardly ever taken it. I think I will give it another shot though, maybe take one and see how I react. I'm glad you posted that. It makes me think that I might have this mutation. Thank you.

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Altostrata

Did you try supplementing with B12 as well? (This can be overstimulating.)

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Tom

I just took one of my methylfolates. Curious to see if I react to it or not. Yes, I also have some methyl-B12s 1000mg. I take them very sporadically.

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Altostrata

Some people find B12 stimulating, try a fraction of a tab to begin with.

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Tom

Yeah, I may have to do the same with the folate, as I wasn't impressed with how that made me feel either.

 

I just found my test, which was from last July, so who knows what it is now. But my Folate was 5.0, which it says is borderline, and my B12 was 301, which is technically not low, but probably actually is.

 

Anyway, I'm glad you mentioned cutting up the B12, cause I hadn't thought of that.

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Iggy131313

please move this to a suppliment area I couldnt find one, has anyone tried deplin? someone on the other forum says it has stopped her suicidal thoughts and made her feel great?

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Ariel56

The Psychiatrists at John Hopkins told me Deplin is useless !! Find a god psyc

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Altostrata

Commented on Emily Deans's blog http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/2011/08/folate-beginning.html?spref=tw (in case this does not publish):

 

Dr. Deans wrote: "So if you prescribe medications meant to maximize the efficiency of neurotransmitter* transmission...."

 

Now that "chemical imbalance" is an embarrassment, is this the current rationalization for psychiatric drugs? Maximizing efficiency of transmission? Is there any evidence for this? Thought not.

 

I read the 5-MTHF findings of M. Fava etc. differently: That people with low B-12 or folate status are being diagnosed with psychiatric disorders and treated with drugs that do not address the nutritional problem. The nutritional deficiency worsens while inappropriate therapy is pursued (overall health risks also increase because of the medication).

 

These people naturally perk up when an appropriate nutritional supplement is added.

 

M. Fava etc. should be writing an apologia to the millions misdiagnosed and treated psychiatrically for physiological conditions. Instead, he's published infomercials for Deplin as an "add-on" to vastly profitable psychiatric drugs.

 

M. Fava was hired by Deplin's manufacturer (see Completed Trials http://www.pamlabrd.com/clinical-trials ) to produce papers touting this brand-name 5-MTHF.

 

There is nothing special about the 5-MTHF in Deplin. 5-MTHF supplements have long been available at lower cost from other manufacturers to treat those with the MTHFR genetic variation affecting folate metabolism. (I am one of those people, and I was misdiagnosed and treated with Paxil, which effectively has destroyed my life.)

 

By calling Deplin a "medical food" available by prescription, it can be reimbursed by health insurance and Medicare. This is enormously profitable to Pamlab, Deplin's manufacturer. Brand-name 5-MTHF Deplin is a health insurance scam.

 

I am very disappointed in you, Dr. Deans.

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dalsaan

They published your quote. I'm surprised

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Altostrata

Me, too. But Deans is far too gullible a consumer of psychiatric infomercials.

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alexjuice

I picked up a supplement today, at the regular grocery store which now carries substantial supplements when it used to only carry basic vitamins.

 

Found myself meandering into predictive Alex mode. In line with this thread, I predict that sometime in the next few years, as supplement market growth continues, that large pharmaceuticals will push their legislative allies to require all supplements go through an FDA approval process. The expense of this will cause smaller supplement makers out of business.

 

The best of the remaining large firms will be acquired by the pharmaceuticals. After this, various supplements and supplement combinations will be declared novel and granted patents. The cost of pharmaceutical grade supplements will go up. Eventually they may be added to coverage plans, and then the cost will go up even more.

 

Anyway, I expect this ... though perhaps not the coverage part as a relatively large % rely on state health benefits and the state has money problems.

 

But, either way, I foresee many more Deplins in the next decade or two.

 

Alex

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Kirbs

I have been doing some price comparisons online and it seems to me that the alternatives to Deplin are typically about 1mg (1000 mcg) whereas Deplin is sold in 7.5 or 15 mg. If you take this into consideration, the alternatives are not really any cheaper. Am I missing something here? I would like to try it and make up my own mind, but this stuff is expensive no regardless of who makes it or where you buy it. Has anyone found a good source for this stuff?

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Altostrata

How much L-methylfolate do you think you need?

 

My point is: L-methylfolate as a psychiatric treatment "works" on people with a dietary deficiency of folate, most likely caused by a MTHFR genetic variation. Folate or B12 deficiency can cause neurological and "psychiatric" symptoms.

 

For most of those people, 1000mcg of methylfolate is plenty to correct the deficiency. (Consuming lots of raw green leafy veggies would help, too.) 15mg of methylfolate just ends up in your urine.

 

The studies advocating use of megadoses of L-methylfolate for psychiatric treatment, which were sponsored by the manufacturer of Deplin to sell their product, are bogus. They are trumpeting a correction of a nutritional deficiency as an advance in psychiatry. Note that they continue the patients who respond to Deplin on psychiatric drugs -- Deplin is sold as an "adjunct" to the drugs.

 

If you wish to buy this particular venture in making psychiatric hay out of a dietary issue, please do purchase Deplin.

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Meimeiquest

I had a big reaction to methyl folate. You might want to check out MTHFR.net.

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Kirbs

I was analyzing it from a monetary point of view. I want to try it, have no idea where to start, and I'm just trying to figure out the cheapest way to do it. If I can buy a higher dosage, cut the tablets and take them every other day vs buying low dosage and taking several pills a day to save money, I will. I don't want to invest much money in this until I've tried it and I am convinced it helps me. If I am impressed, I will happily spend the money. I was about to buy a bottle or two from MethylPro...but if I am just going to be pissing away most of the product and wasting money, then I will try something else.

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Kirbs

If it helps, I am 48 y.o, 6' 1" and about 210 pounds. I have been taking 50mg of sertraline daily for years just started (2.5 weeks ago) taking 150mg of Wellbutrin daily.

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Meimeiquest

If I remember correctly, Deplin was pretty small (but that was years ago). The Metafolin I have is scored and was easy to quarter. The writer at MTHFR.net strongly recommends starting low, then working up. There is a thread here also on The Importance of Methylation and B Vitamins that you might find helpful.

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Kirbs

Thank you both for your feedback. My PCP had me come in today for an "advanced lipid panel" and I did see that MTHFR was listed among the items he wanted tested. Thanks for recommending MTHFR.net - good information. I decided to follow Altostrata's advice on starting with a low dosage of L-methylfolate and ordered HomocysteX Plus and a bottle of Niacin from SeekingHealth. I ordered it before I asked my PCP if he would test me for the MTHFR mutations because I was impatient :-) If I test positive for the MTHFR, I'll be a step ahead of the game...if not I'll be out $40.

 

Thanks again!

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Barbarannamated

I had a big reaction to methyl folate. You might want to check out MTHFR.net.

What type of reaction did you have, good or bad? I am aware that I have this genetic variant. (Please excuse if you've already explained)

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Meimeiquest

 

I had a big reaction to methyl folate. You might want to check out MTHFR.net.

What type of reaction did you have, good or bad? I am aware that I have this genetic variant. (Please excuse if you've already explained)

High anxiety

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btdt

I'm going to move this to Symptoms and What Helps -- people may wish to try L-methylfolate supplementation for symptoms. It's a disgrace that psychiatry may be treating folate deficiency with antidepressants, then claim folate works as an "add-on" treatment. Folate deficiency via MTHFR genetic variation should be a differential diagnosis. But that's only one of the many disgraces of the profession.

Is this a test the doctor would find cause to do on his own or something a person has to ask for?  Not that they do all I ask they don't.  I am just wondering how people find out if this is an issue?  Is this a routine test done on physicals ect?  

 

I just read this:

As it turns out, MTHFR mutations can be responsible for:

  • muscle pain
  • insomnia
  • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • memory loss
  • brain fog
  • muscle tenderness
  • autism
  • decreased serotonin
  • decreased norepinepherine
  • depression

These are all things I experience. (And because my mood disorders are related to both serotonin and norepinepherine, it’s no wonder that an SNRI like Effexor XR was what I needed to make a difference.)

http://wellinthishouse.com/mthfr-my-genetic-mutations-folic-acid-and-medical-mysteries-possibly-explained/6150/

Is this person completely wrong or am I beyond understanding this today?  Seemed to me an hour ago I read the opposite when I started reading this thread... 

I need a reality check please. 

I was trying to learn about testing for this.. 

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Altostrata

Any doctor can order an MTHFR test. It's not a routine test, probably you would have to ask for it.

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Jshect

Commented on Emily Deans's blog http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/2011/08/folate-beginning.html?spref=tw (in case this does not publish):

 

Dr. Deans wrote: "So if you prescribe medications meant to maximize the efficiency of neurotransmitter* transmission...."

 

Now that "chemical imbalance" is an embarrassment, is this the current rationalization for psychiatric drugs? Maximizing efficiency of transmission? Is there any evidence for this? Thought not.

 

I read the 5-MTHF findings of M. Fava etc. differently: That people with low B-12 or folate status are being diagnosed with psychiatric disorders and treated with drugs that do not address the nutritional problem. The nutritional deficiency worsens while inappropriate therapy is pursued (overall health risks also increase because of the medication).

 

These people naturally perk up when an appropriate nutritional supplement is added.

 

M. Fava etc. should be writing an apologia to the millions misdiagnosed and treated psychiatrically for physiological conditions. Instead, he's published infomercials for Deplin as an "add-on" to vastly profitable psychiatric drugs.

 

M. Fava was hired by Deplin's manufacturer (see Completed Trials http://www.pamlabrd.com/clinical-trials ) to produce papers touting this brand-name 5-MTHF.

 

There is nothing special about the 5-MTHF in Deplin. 5-MTHF supplements have long been available at lower cost from other manufacturers to treat those with the MTHFR genetic variation affecting folate metabolism. (I am one of those people, and I was misdiagnosed and treated with Paxil, which effectively has destroyed my life.)

 

By calling Deplin a "medical food" available by prescription, it can be reimbursed by health insurance and Medicare. This is enormously profitable to Pamlab, Deplin's manufacturer. Brand-name 5-MTHF Deplin is a health insurance scam.

 

I am very disappointed in you, Dr. Deans.

I am confused with this thread. If you have the genetic flaw than how exactly is Deplin harmful other than being extremely expensive. I've been on Deplin for 3 years and it had a huge effect on me. It kicked me into overdrive

along with Wellbutrin.

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Meimeiquest

Maybe you could read the thread on methylation and B vitamins, and then ask some specific questions? Basically, the methylation cycle can have other problems, so if you get too much folate past the original problem, the system is unable to handle it. This is called methyl trapping, I think. Too much inflammation in the body can also cause unexpected side effects. This whole thing is very complex, but given your situation, I would recommend you try to learn as much as possible.

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btdt

too much folic acide same as folate...

"

Toxicity

There is no health risk associated with folate intake from food. However, there is risk of toxicity from folic acid found in dietary supplements and fortified foods. Folic acid is used to treat a folate deficiency. However, a folate deficiency is virtually indistinguishable from a vitamin B12 deficiency. Large doses of folic acid given to an individual who has a vitamin B12 deficiency and not a folate deficiency can cause irreversible neurological damages. The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine has established a tolerable upper intake level for folate. For children 1 to 3 years the limit is 300 mcg daily, for children 4 to 8 the limit is 400 mcg daily, for children 9 to 13, the limit is 600 mcg daily, for adolescents 14 to 18 the limit is 600 mcg and for those 19 and older the limit is 1,000 mcg per day. Intakes above recommended limits increase the risk of adverse health effects.

Signs and Symptoms

Having too much folic acid in the body can result in a variety of signs and symptoms. Less serious side effects include digestive problems, nausea, loss of appetite, bloating, gas, a bitter or unpleasant taste in the mouth, sleep disturbances, depression, excessive excitement, irritability and a zinc deficiency. More severe signs include psychotic behavior, numbness or tingling, mouth pain, weakness, trouble concentrating, confusion, fatigue and even seizures. An allergic reaction to folic acid may cause wheezing, swelling of the face and throat or a skin rash."

 

Tricky stuff

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