Jump to content

DNA gene find 'transforms' theories on how brain works


Phil
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Administrator

Seems to be related to neurogenesis:

 

"....They found that the retrotransposons were particularly active in areas of the brain linked to cell renewal.

....

 

Dr Geoff Faulkner, from the Roslin Institute, based at the University of Edinburgh, said: "This research completely overturns the belief that the genetic make-up of brain cells remains static throughout life and provides us with new information about how the brain works.

 

"If we can understand better how these subtle genetic changes occur we could shed light on how brain cells regenerate, how processes like memory formation may have a genetic basis and possibly link the activity of these genes to brain diseases."...."

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator Emeritus

Very interesting.

 

Fits well with my personal experience and what I've seen/heard/read from others.

 

Of course I could just be saying that because it supports what I'm always saying about the importance of slow regulated tapers with intermittent holds to allow brain remodeling to catch up.

 

But the reason I say that is because of stuff like this. Drugs that screw with neurotransmitters are going to cause these effects--concrete, physical effects, changes in complex systems, changes in genes and gene expression.

 

None of this is quickly reversible. The brain has no evolutionarily-designed inbuilt mechanisms to rebalance such extreme disturbances of its natural function as are caused by these drugs. These disturbances are deep and profound. And when people quit taking the drugs, you can't expect that stuff to just bounce back.

 

I think it's especially interesting that antidepressant discontinuation so often results in a worsening three to twelve months out, at which point so many people go back on the drugs. I can't help wondering if they took a year to taper off the drugs, instead of just weeks or months, if that "relapse" effect would maybe go away, if there was enough time for the brain to gradually re-establish its pre-drug chemistry and genetics, or something close to it.

 

For sure, if nothing else, you would think this kind of information would make doctors more cautious about giving drugs that screw with neurotransmitters. I've become really cynical about the supposed intelligence of doctors, I have to say. I mean, this seems pretty damned obvious.

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

May 2021            7                       0.01                  0.0037                   1

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rhi said: For sure, if nothing else, you would think this kind of information would make doctors more cautious about giving drugs that screw with neurotransmitters. I've become really cynical about the supposed intelligence of doctors, I have to say. I mean, this seems pretty damned obvious.

 

LOL!! Thanks, Rhi. I sure needed that! It would be interesting to know the average IQ of MDs over the years. I enjoy reminding hubby that mine is higher ;) 2 points is something, no?!

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Rhi, that's a working theory some are using -- slower tapers are better for everyone, even those who have no noticeable withdrawal symptoms, reducing incidence of "tardive" symptoms later.

 

Hey, welcome back!

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy