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carter15: Doc prescribed Lexapro


carter15

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I am 26 years old. A little life story. In high school I was bullied and then had two long term abusive relationships that just ended recently. I also grew up in poverty. I am sad, depressed, recently my doctor prescribed me antidepressants, its called lexapro. I havent taken antidepresants in my life, I just dealt with life raw, I dont have many accomplishments and no money. My fear is that I'll grow accustom to the medication induced willpower and not want to get off them. That's my first "gut" reaction. . I always try to be positive around people, even if I feel empty inside, I just want to fill up the inner sadness or void, my issue is sometimes my mood drops, i feel apathetic and demotivated. Its a confusing place to be, I actually sometimes feel "weak". My main issue is the low low low moods and apathy and negative thoughts coupled with no motivation. I dont know whether I should start

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  • Moderator Emeritus

Lexapro is addictive. If you take it you will become addicted. If you don't take it you won't.

2001: 20mg paroxetine
2003-2014: Switched between 20mg citalopram and 10mg escitalopram with several failed CT's
2015: Jan/ Feb-very fast taper off citalopram; Mar/ Apr-crashed; 23 Apr-reinstated 5mg; 05 May-updosed to 10mg; 15 Jul-started taper; Aug-9.0mg; Sep-8.1mg; Oct-7.6mg; Nov-6.8mg; Dec-6.2mg
2016: Jan-5.7mg; Feb-5.2mg; Mar-5.0mg;  Apr-4.5mg; May-4.05mg; Jun-3.65mg; Jul-3.3mg; Aug-2.95mg; 04Sep-2.65mg; 25Sep-2.4mg; 23Oct-2.15mg; 13Nov-1.95mg; 04Dec-1.75mg; 25Dec-1.55mg.
2017: 08Jan-1.4mg; 22Jan-1.25mg; 12Feb-1.1mg; 26Feb-1.0mg; 05Mar-0.9mg; 15Mar-0.8mg; 22Mar-0.7mg; 02Apr-0.6; 09Apr-0.5mg; 16Apr-0.4mg; 23Apr-0.3; 03May-0.2mg; 10May-0.1mg

Finished taper 17 May 2017.

 

I am not a medical professional. The information I provide is not medical advice. If in doubt please consult with a qualified healthcare provider.

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  • Moderator Emeritus

Hi Carter, sorry to hear that you have had to deal with so many challenges at such a young age.  Unfortunately some people can be very cruel without caring about the long-term consequences of their behaviour.  While it is your decision and only your decision whether or not you start to take anti-depressants, it's important that you do as much research as you possibly can before you make that decision.  Anti-depressants are notoriously difficult to withdrawal from and are the cause of some of the symptoms you are talking about.  You may end up in a much worse place than where you are now.  From what I have read on this site, Lexapro is a very difficult drug to get off of.  

This is just my opinion, and while I do think anti-depressants are necessary in some cases, I think doctors prescribe them way too easily when they really aren't needed.  In my opinion, they are a bandaid solution for the majority of the people who have had them prescribed.  If I were you, I'd get a referral to a psychologist and deal with the sadness, void, apathy and demotivation.  After coming out of two long-term abusive relationships, it is only natural that you would be feeling the way you do.  Trauma can be difficult to heal from, but with the right professional, someone who has experience dealing with women/men coming out of abusive relationships, you will be in much better hands than taking a drug which will only mask the pain.  

If I'd known of the long-term effects of anti-depressants, I NEVER would have even considered starting them.  Depending on the drug, it can take years and years to safely come off of these drugs.  My sister's doctor recommended she start taking anti-depressants for fibromyalgia and thankfully she talked to me first and I told her under no circumstances should she start taking anti-depresaants, as they will dull your emotions until they don't exist and how difficult they are to come off of.  Life changes, everyone has ups and downs, but the difficulties caused by anti-depressants use have long-term consequences that people aren't told about.   

There are many horror stories on this site relating the difficulties that people have had because of anti-depressants and I encourage you to read as many stories as you can before you make the decision to start taking Lexapro (or any other anti-depressant).  In the long-run, it is my belief that a good psychologist will be able to help you far better than any anti-depressant will.    

Current Prescription Drugs for Hypothyroidism:  Synthroid 100mcg / Cytomel 5mcg (15 years Pristiq/Effexor)

Tapering Schedule
September 15, 2016 - switched from Pristiq 50mg to Effexor XR 75mg; November 10, 2016 - reduced to 67.5 Effexor XR
December 9, 2016 - reduced 60.75
January 5, 2017 - reduced 54.67
January 30, 2017 - reduced to 49.0
February 20, 2017 - reduced to 44.0 
May 20, 2017 - reduced to 40.25 (holding for additional month due to late onset of withdrawal symptoms after this taper)
July 17, 2017 - reduced to 38.24
August 15, 2017 - reduced to 37.5 (50% of my original dose)

October 15, 2017 - reduced to 35.6

November 12, 2017 - reduced to 33.8
December 15, 2017 - up-dose to 35.6
December 28, 2017 - up-dose to 37.5

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Hi Carter, sorry to hear that you have had to deal with so many challenges at such a young age.  Unfortunately some people can be very cruel without caring about the long-term consequences of their behaviour.  While it is your decision and only your decision whether or not you start to take anti-depressants, it's important that you do as much research as you possibly can before you make that decision.  Anti-depressants are notoriously difficult to withdrawal from and are the cause of some of the symptoms you are talking about.  You may end up in a much worse place than where you are now.  From what I have read on this site, Lexapro is a very difficult drug to get off of.  

This is just my opinion, and while I do think anti-depressants are necessary in some cases, I think doctors prescribe them way too easily when they really aren't needed.  In my opinion, they are a bandaid solution for the majority of the people who have had them prescribed.  If I were you, I'd get a referral to a psychologist and deal with the sadness, void, apathy and demotivation.  After coming out of two long-term abusive relationships, it is only natural that you would be feeling the way you do.  Trauma can be difficult to heal from, but with the right professional, someone who has experience dealing with women/men coming out of abusive relationships, you will be in much better hands than taking a drug which will only mask the pain.  

If I'd known of the long-term effects of anti-depressants, I NEVER would have even considered starting them.  Depending on the drug, it can take years and years to safely come off of these drugs.  My sister's doctor recommended she start taking anti-depressants for fibromyalgia and thankfully she talked to me first and I told her under no circumstances should she start taking anti-depresaants, as they will dull your emotions until they don't exist and how difficult they are to come off of.  Life changes, everyone has ups and downs, but the difficulties caused by anti-depressants use have long-term consequences that people aren't told about.   

There are many horror stories on this site relating the difficulties that people have had because of anti-depressants and I encourage you to read as many stories as you can before you make the decision to start taking Lexapro (or any other anti-depressant).  In the long-run, it is my belief that a good psychologist will be able to help you far better than any anti-depressant will.

 

Well said baroquep!

Dose History: 19 Feb 2014 - Escitalopram 10mg daily June 2015 - Started taper, 5mg every other day July 2015 - 5mg every 2 days August 2015 - 5mg every 3 days September 2015 - 5mg every 4 days Sept 14th - Completed tapering, but at 7 weeks "drug free" I suffered serious WD symptoms as a consequence of "incorrect" tapering. Nov 25 2015 - Re-instated Cipralex @ 2.5mg daily. WD symptoms faded. Held at this dose and experienced "windows and waves". 12 Oct 2017 Reduced dose to 1.25mg. 13 Mar 2018 Reduced dose to 0.625mg (approx.). 16 April 2018 0mg. Windows and waves triggered by stress (IBS/reflux, headaches, sinus issues) Aug 2019 Mirena coil fitted 6 Jan 2020 MAJOR Wave hit 19 months following last dose (protracted WD).  Symptoms listed below Mar 2020 Mirena coil removal.

Therapy: Nov 15th 2016 Re-started therapy Jan 19th 2017 Started CBT Dec 2017 Started listening to Hypnotherapy CD (self-esteem). Nov 2019 Started couples therapy.

Supplements: "Bioglan" Biotic Balance Ultimate Flora 10 billion CFU, live Bacteria, Probiotic, suitable for Vegetarians, with Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Lactobacillus Rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium Longum"Pukka" Vitalise a unique blend of 30 energising botanicals.

Diet: 16 April 2018 Detox cleanse / anti-candida for 90 days. Jan 2020 Started "small plate" diet (i.e child size portions).

Exercise: Stretching, Yoga, Pilates, Spinning, Elliptical/upper body workout, walking.

Medical Test Results: 4 Jan 2017 Homeopathic Treatment starts 24 Feb 2017 Started weight loss program 24 Mar 2017 Naturopathic Treatment + anti-Candida diet started due to suspected Candida Related Complex (CRC). DETOXED for 7 weeks to "re-set" gut. April 2017 "Genova Diagnostics" Comprehensive Stool Analysis NEGATIVE; Full Blood Count (Normal) / Blood Cholesterol: 5.6 (Borderline) / Blood Sugar (Normal) / 28 Jun 2017 FSH 8.2 / 14 Nov 2017 FSH 17.7 Dec 2017 Blood Cholesterol: 3.9 (Normal) / Kidney Function (Normal) / Blood Sugar (Normal). December 2017 "Genova Diagnostics" Food panel allergy (bloodwork) analysis - a few "VERY LOW/VL" allergens; Mar 2018 "Genova Diagnostics" SIBO urine analysis: High Level of Yeast/fungal markers found in small intestine but NO SIBO.  April 2018 Thyroid (Normal) / Full Blood Count (Normal) / FSH (Normal). 16 April 2018 Started anti-Candida diet - 3 month protocol.   25 March 2020 All test results "Normal". CRP" 5 mg/L (normal range to 0-5 mg/L).

Symptoms:  Flu-like symptoms, anxiety, anhedonia, sinus headaches right-side (severe), IBS issues/reflux (severe)**, tinnitus, fatigue, inner tremor, nausea, chills/hot flushes, pounding heart, muscular issues including stiff left hip flexor, intense anger, PSSD (ongoing).  **Histhamine intolerance (suspected).

 

Major Life Events: 

Re-located to UK from Canada: Jan 2016

My father died: 5:05pm, Monday 5 Feb 2018 Last Lexapro dose: 16 April 2018 (its now been over a year since I quit ADs)  Moved house: Friday 23rd February 2018  "Divorced" toxic Mother: Monday 26 March 2018 Starting working again: 19 November 2018  Diagnosed with: 5th August 2021 PTSD/C-PTSD

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  • Moderator Emeritus

Sorry to have been so blunt with my advice, but I was the same age as you when I first encountered SSRIs and I really wish someone would have presented the facts in such a straightforward manner.

 

The other piece of advice I wish I had gotten would be to read "Your Drug May Be Your Problem" by Peter Breggin MD.

2001: 20mg paroxetine
2003-2014: Switched between 20mg citalopram and 10mg escitalopram with several failed CT's
2015: Jan/ Feb-very fast taper off citalopram; Mar/ Apr-crashed; 23 Apr-reinstated 5mg; 05 May-updosed to 10mg; 15 Jul-started taper; Aug-9.0mg; Sep-8.1mg; Oct-7.6mg; Nov-6.8mg; Dec-6.2mg
2016: Jan-5.7mg; Feb-5.2mg; Mar-5.0mg;  Apr-4.5mg; May-4.05mg; Jun-3.65mg; Jul-3.3mg; Aug-2.95mg; 04Sep-2.65mg; 25Sep-2.4mg; 23Oct-2.15mg; 13Nov-1.95mg; 04Dec-1.75mg; 25Dec-1.55mg.
2017: 08Jan-1.4mg; 22Jan-1.25mg; 12Feb-1.1mg; 26Feb-1.0mg; 05Mar-0.9mg; 15Mar-0.8mg; 22Mar-0.7mg; 02Apr-0.6; 09Apr-0.5mg; 16Apr-0.4mg; 23Apr-0.3; 03May-0.2mg; 10May-0.1mg

Finished taper 17 May 2017.

 

I am not a medical professional. The information I provide is not medical advice. If in doubt please consult with a qualified healthcare provider.

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that was great advice, thank you alot

Hi Carter, sorry to hear that you have had to deal with so many challenges at such a young age.  Unfortunately some people can be very cruel without caring about the long-term consequences of their behaviour.  While it is your decision and only your decision whether or not you start to take anti-depressants, it's important that you do as much research as you possibly can before you make that decision.  Anti-depressants are notoriously difficult to withdrawal from and are the cause of some of the symptoms you are talking about.  You may end up in a much worse place than where you are now.  From what I have read on this site, Lexapro is a very difficult drug to get off of.  

This is just my opinion, and while I do think anti-depressants are necessary in some cases, I think doctors prescribe them way too easily when they really aren't needed.  In my opinion, they are a bandaid solution for the majority of the people who have had them prescribed.  If I were you, I'd get a referral to a psychologist and deal with the sadness, void, apathy and demotivation.  After coming out of two long-term abusive relationships, it is only natural that you would be feeling the way you do.  Trauma can be difficult to heal from, but with the right professional, someone who has experience dealing with women/men coming out of abusive relationships, you will be in much better hands than taking a drug which will only mask the pain.  

If I'd known of the long-term effects of anti-depressants, I NEVER would have even considered starting them.  Depending on the drug, it can take years and years to safely come off of these drugs.  My sister's doctor recommended she start taking anti-depressants for fibromyalgia and thankfully she talked to me first and I told her under no circumstances should she start taking anti-depresaants, as they will dull your emotions until they don't exist and how difficult they are to come off of.  Life changes, everyone has ups and downs, but the difficulties caused by anti-depressants use have long-term consequences that people aren't told about.   

There are many horror stories on this site relating the difficulties that people have had because of anti-depressants and I encourage you to read as many stories as you can before you make the decision to start taking Lexapro (or any other anti-depressant).  In the long-run, it is my belief that a good psychologist will be able to help you far better than any anti-depressant will.    

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i will checkthe book out, thank you

Sorry to have been so blunt with my advice, but I was the same age as you when I first encountered SSRIs and I really wish someone would have presented the facts in such a straightforward manner.

The other piece of advice I wish I had gotten would be to read "Your Drug May Be Your Problem" by Peter Breggin MD.

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  • Administrator

Hi, Carter.

 

Welcome to Surviving Antidepressants. 

 

I'm so glad that you are researching your drug before taking it. Like the others who have already posted, I too wish I had found alternatives. 

 

There are so many other ways of handling low moods, apathy, and negative thoughts.

 

First, how is your diet? Are you consuming a lot of caffeine and sugar? Are you getting enough fruits and veggies? 

 

Second, there are studies that show that exercise works better than antidepressants. This is one of those studies:

 

After demonstrating that 30 minutes of brisk exercise three times a week is just as effective as drug therapy in relieving the symptoms of major depression in the short term, medical center researchers have now shown that continued exercise greatly reduces the chances of the depression returning. 

 

Study: Exercise has Long-Lasting Effect on Depression

 

And third, as Dan mentioned, Lexapro is addictive. It's the kind of addiction known as "dependency". This type of addiction is not understood by the medical community. Dependency happens when your mind and body adapt to the drug. And when the drug is removed, you suffer from a withdrawal syndrome. You can read through any number of threads here in the Introduction section to see what withdrawal is like for members here. 

 

You may also want to check out Robert Whitaker, who writes and lectures on the dangers of these drugs. Here is a short video:

 

Robert Whitaker, author Anatomy of an Epidemic - VIDEO

 

Not only do these drugs cause withdrawal, they also have a poor long-term outcome and can actually make depression and anxiety chronic. This is known as oppositional tolerance, as explored in this article:

 

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name: Tardive Dysphoria - Article

 

Whitaker has a really great book that is highly recommended:

 

Anatomy of an Epidemic - Book

 

In addition to exercise and nutrition, there are many studies that show that activities such as mindfulness meditation and trauma-sensitive or restorative yoga are great ways of handling depression and anxiety, especially for people who are healing from trauma such as bullying and abusive relationships.

 

We have a wonderful section of the forum where you can learn more about ways of handling your emotions without drugs:

 

Non-drug Techniques to cope with emotional symptoms

 

Perhaps you would benefit from therapy from a holistic therapist, someone who can't prescribe pills but will work with other techniques and therapies to heal from your depression. 

 

Drug free May 22, 2015 after 30 years of neuroleptics, benzos, z-drugs, so-called "anti"-depressants, and amphetamines 

 

My Success Story:  Shep's Success: "Leaving Plato's Cave"

 

And what is good, Phaedrus, and what is not good — need we ask anyone to tell us these things? ~ Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance


I am not a medical professional and this is not medical advice, but simply information based on my own experience, as well as other members who have survived these drugs.

 

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Thank you so much I appreciate this alot and I will be checking out all the links you shared!

Hi, Carter.

 

Welcome to Surviving Antidepressants. 

 

I'm so glad that you are researching your drug before taking it. Like the others who have already posted, I too wish I had found alternatives. 

 

There are so many other ways of handling low moods, apathy, and negative thoughts.

 

First, how is your diet? Are you consuming a lot of caffeine and sugar? Are you getting enough fruits and veggies? 

 

Second, there are studies that show that exercise works better than antidepressants. This is one of those studies:

 

After demonstrating that 30 minutes of brisk exercise three times a week is just as effective as drug therapy in relieving the symptoms of major depression in the short term, medical center researchers have now shown that continued exercise greatly reduces the chances of the depression returning. 

 

Study: Exercise has Long-Lasting Effect on Depression

 

And third, as Dan mentioned, Lexapro is addictive. It's the kind of addiction known as "dependency". This type of addiction is not understood by the medical community. Dependency happens when your mind and body adapt to the drug. And when the drug is removed, you suffer from a withdrawal syndrome. You can read through any number of threads here in the Introduction section to see what withdrawal is like for members here. 

 

You may also want to check out Robert Whitaker, who writes and lectures on the dangers of these drugs. Here is a short video:

 

Robert Whitaker, author Anatomy of an Epidemic - VIDEO

 

Not only do these drugs cause withdrawal, they also have a poor long-term outcome and can actually make depression and anxiety chronic. This is known as oppositional tolerance, as explored in this article:

 

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name: Tardive Dysphoria - Article

 

Whitaker has a really great book that is highly recommended:

 

Anatomy of an Epidemic - Book

 

In addition to exercise and nutrition, there are many studies that show that activities such as mindfulness meditation and trauma-sensitive or restorative yoga are great ways of handling depression and anxiety, especially for people who are healing from trauma such as bullying and abusive relationships.

 

We have a wonderful section of the forum where you can learn more about ways of handling your emotions without drugs:

 

Non-drug Techniques to cope with emotional symptoms

 

Perhaps you would benefit from therapy from a holistic therapist, someone who can't prescribe pills but will work with other techniques and therapies to heal from your depression. 

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  • Administrator

You're welcome, Carter.

 

Perhaps pick a couple of activities that you like from the Non-drug Techniques to cope with emotional symptoms section and add them into your daily routine. 

 

Perhaps a 30 minute walk a day and a guided meditation. After you get used to that, add in another. Perhaps you like art or journaling or yoga. 

 

Before you know it, you are building a healthy lifestyle to protect you from depression.  That's the best defense there is. Unlike taking drugs, these are activities that will also build your confidence.  :)

Drug free May 22, 2015 after 30 years of neuroleptics, benzos, z-drugs, so-called "anti"-depressants, and amphetamines 

 

My Success Story:  Shep's Success: "Leaving Plato's Cave"

 

And what is good, Phaedrus, and what is not good — need we ask anyone to tell us these things? ~ Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance


I am not a medical professional and this is not medical advice, but simply information based on my own experience, as well as other members who have survived these drugs.

 

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