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Foods for the Brain


Shanti
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The brain is made up of 60% fat. Good fats are helpful in repairing our brain and nervous system. Many of us can't take Fish Oil. But there are alternatives. Flax Seed is a good one. You don't have to get the Flax Seed Oil, you can buy ground Flax Seed and just add it to a salad or just swallow some. Be sure to get cut or ground Flax Seeds because whole seeds are often not chewed up enough to release the oil. Flax Seeds are also good for depression. Another alternative to Fish Oil is to just eat some fish every day. Tuna even, just make sure it's Mercury free. Organic is always the best way to go. Nuts and seeds are very good for the brain, such as walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews and almonds. Walnuts also help clean the liver. Good seeds for the brain are pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds also have Thiamin, good for the brain.

 

Watermelon is the best food for cleansing the liver. It's good to have a juicer and make a good watermelon juice to drink every day.

 

Choline is good for the brain as well. Choline can be found in wheat germ, peanuts, whole wheat flour and pecans.

 

Here's a good article about fats, good fat vs. bad fat from Dr. Sears. The article can be found here.

 

 

 

DHA as a Brain Food

Fats make up sixty percent of the brain and the nerves that run every system in the body. So, it stands to reason that the better the fat in the diet, the better the brain. So, with all the fat eaten by the average American, why don't we have more geniuses in this country? The average American brain is getting enough fat, but it's not getting the right kind of fat.

 

Think of your brain as the master gland that sends chemical messengers throughout the body, telling each organ how to work. An important group of these chemical messengers are the prostaglandins (so-called because they were originally discovered in the prostate gland). Prostaglandins initiate the body's self-repair system. The body needs two kinds of fat to manufacture healthy brain cells (the message senders) and prostaglandins (the messengers). These are omega 6 fatty acids (found in many oils, such as safflower, sunflower, corn, and sesame oils) and omega 3 fatty acids (found in flax, pumpkin seeds and walnuts, and coldwater fish, such as salmon and tuna). The foods from which oil can be extracted are generally the foods highest in essential fatty acids.

 

Most important to brain function are the two essential fatty acids, linoleic (or omega 6) and alpha linolenic (or omega 3). These are the prime structural components of brain cell membranes and are also an important part of the enzymes within cell membranes that allow the membranes to transport valuable nutrients in and out of the cells.

 

When the cells of the human body - and the human brain - are deprived of the essential fatty acids they need to grow and function, the cells will try to build replacement fatty acids that are similar, but may actually be harmful. Higher blood levels of "replacement fatty acids" are associated with diets that are high in hydrogenated fats and diets that contain excessive amounts of omega 6 fatty acids. Levels of replacement fatty acids have been found to be elevated in persons suffering from depression or Attention Deficit Disorder. A diet rich in omega 3 fatty acids (such as the LNA from flax oil or the EPA and DHA from fish oils) not only provides the body with healthy fats, but it also lowers the blood level of potentially harmful ones, such as cholesterol and, possibly, even reversing the effects of excess trans fatty acids. A great tasting option for children to get their daily recommendation of omega 3 are Dr. Sears Family Essentials Omega-3 dha supplement fruit chews.

 

Using the lock and key analogy will help you understand how the brain communication system works. Neurotransmitters are biochemical messengers that carry information from one brain cell to another, sort of like sparks flying across the gap between nerve cells. Each cell membrane contains a series of locks. The various message carriers (prostaglandins and neurotransmitters) are like keys. The keys and the locks must match. When the cell membrane is unhealthy because it is made of the wrong kind of replacement fatty acids, the keys won't fit, and brain function suffers. Nutrients may also fail to fit in a mismade lock.

 

The eye is a perfect example of the importance of getting the right kind of fat. The retina of the eye contains a high concentration of the fatty acid DHA, which the body forms from nutritious fats in the diet. The more nutritious the fat, the better the eye can function. And since most people are visual learners, better eyes mean better brains.

 

Western diets contain too much of the omega 6 fatty acids and too little of the omega 3's. Omega 3 fatty acids are found in ground flax seeds and flaxseed oil, coldwater fish (primarily salmon and tuna), canola oil, soybeans, walnuts, wheatgerm, pumpkin seeds, and eggs.

 

Smart fats for growing brains*. Fats can also influence brain development and performance, especially at either end of life -- growing infants and elderly people. In fact, there are two windows of time in which the brain is especially sensitive to nutrition: the first two years of life for a growing baby and the last couple decades of life for a senior citizen. Both growing and aging brains need nutritious fats.

 

The most rapid brain growth occurs during the first year of life, with the infant's brain tripling in size by the first birthday. During this stage of rapid central nervous system growth, the brain uses sixty percent of the total energy consumed by the infant. Fats are a major component of the brain cell membrane and the myelin sheath around each nerve. So, it makes sense that getting enough fat, and the right kinds of fat, can greatly affect brain development and performance. In fact, during the first year, around fifty percent of an infant's daily calories come from fat. Mother Nature knows how important fat is for babies; fifty percent of the calories in mother's milk is fat.

 

Different species provide different types of fat in their milk, fine-tuned to the needs of that particular animal. For example, mother cows provide milk that is high in saturated fats and low in brain-building fats, such as DHA. This helps their calves grow rapidly, though it may not do much for their brains. In adult cows, the brain is small compared with the body. Cows don't have to do a lot of thinking to survive. In human infants, the brain grows faster than the body. Highly developed brains are important to human beings, so human milk is low in body- building saturated fats and rich in brain-building fats, such as the fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), an omega 3 fatty acid.

 

DHA is the primary structural component of brain tissue, so it stands to reason that a deficiency of DHA in the diet could translate into a deficiency in brain function. In fact, research is increasingly recognizing the possibility that DHA has a crucial influence on neurotransmitters in the brain, helping brain cells better communicate with each other. Asian cultures have long appreciated the brain-building effects of DHA. In Japan, DHA is considered such an important "health food" that it is used as a nutritional supplement to enrich some foods, and students frequently take DHA pills before examinations.

 

Just how important is DHA for brain development? Consider these research findings:

 

Infants who have low amounts of DHA in their diet have reduced brain development and diminished visual acuity.

The increased intelligence and academic performance of breastfed compared with formula- fed infants has been attributed in part to the increased DHA content of human milk.

Cultures whose diet is high in omega 3 fatty acids (such as the Eskimos who eat a lot of fish) have a lower incidence of degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.

Experimental animals whose diets are low in DHA have been found to have smaller brains and delayed central nervous system development.

Some children with poor school performance because of ADD, have been shown to have insufficient essential fatty acids in their diet. (See A.D.D. - A Nutritional Deficiency?)

 

 

DUMB FATS

 

Just as there are fats that improve how the brain functions, there are fats that hinder the brain's work. The dumbest fats are those that are man-made through the process of hydrogenation. These fats are referred to on package labels as "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated." A diet rich in these fats not only deprives the eater of the smart fats, but they can actually interfere with the action of smart fats on brain function.

 

NOURISHING TEEN BRAINS

Even though the brain has completed most of its growth by adolescence, it continues to make vital connections. This is another window of opportunity for brain growth when a healthy diet is important. However, adolescence may be a period when there is a lack of essential fatty acids in the diet. There are several reasons for this deficiency: adolescents tend to eat a lot of saturated fat foods and foods that contain hydrogenated fats. Young athletes often restrict their fat intake in order to keep fit and trim. When they cut out fat, in general, they also cut out healthy fats. Teen brains need more fish and fewer fries.

 

NUTRITIP: Fat Food for Growing Brains

 

While a baby is in the womb, the brain grows more rapidly than in any other stage of infant or child development. And during the first year after birth, the brain continues to grow rapidly, tripling in size by an infant's first birthday. So, it would make sense for a pregnant and lactating mother to supplement her diet with brain-building nutrients, primarily the omega 3 fatty acids found in fish and flax oil (one tablespoon of flax oil daily, four ounces of tuna or salmon three times a week). In fact, some nutritionists recommend that pregnant and lactating women take 200 milligrams of DHA supplements a day.

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Of course, drink lots of water.

 

Celtic Sea Salt is good for strengthening cell structure and helps with hydration. Avoid table salt.

 

"Ordinary table salt that is bought in the supermarkets may also contain additive elements such as aluminum silicate to keep it powdery and porous.

- Aluminum is a very toxic element in our nervous system. It has been implicated as one of the primary causes of Alzheimer's disease."

 

Read more at Health Benefits of Water

 

When buying sea salt, be sure it isn't a heat compressed product. Celtic Sea Salt is best and contains 80 minerals that you won't find in Table Salt.

 

If you are experiencing waking in the night to go to the bathroom, put a pinch or two of celtic Sea Salt in a glass of water and drink it before bed. The minerals will help keep you balanced at night. Having to wake up to go to the bathroom is an indication that you're having an imbalance of minerals and the Celtic Sea Salt will help.

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Foods that aggravate the nervous system are: MSG (Monosodium Glutimate) found in many packaged foods such as soups and lunch meat. Aspartame (Nutrasweet) found in many diet sodas and diet foods. Avoid junk food, sugar and caffeine.

 

Many people that are having trouble eating might turn to Chicken Noodle Soup or Broth. Most of this contains MSG and is not good for you. Campbells does have a line called "Healthy Request" that doesn't have MSG. If you're drinking broth, get it from the health food store. MSG crosses the blood brain barrier. Definitely not good for us during withdrawals. Body Systems Affected by MSG.

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I can't remember if it's the Healthy Request line or the Healthy Choice. So just look at the ingredients. I know one of them doesn't have MSG.

 

Btw, isn't it interesting that walnuts are good for the brain and they look like little brains?

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From Foods That Are Good for the Brain

 

"Including certain foods as snacks can do much to improve brain functioning. Below are examples of healthy foods. Foods high in antioxidants (healthy chemicals that clean the brain from free radicals that cause cell deterioration) can dramatically reverse memory loss, restore motor coordination and balance. These foods are raisins, berries, apples, grapes, cherries, prunes, and spinach.

 

Another healthy group of foods contain Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s help improve general brain functioning and restore memory. Foods high in Omega-3 include: salmon, mackerel, sardines, herring, flax oil, and walnuts.

 

The whole body runs on carbohydrates. Too much of simple carbohydrates can be harmful to the body and brain functioning by creating a sharp rise in blood sugar. Complex carbohydrates digests well and do not cause sharp rises in blood sugar. Foods high in complex carbohydrates include peanuts, dried apricots, dried beans, yogurt, oat bran, All Bran cereal (be careful of the high sugar content in some brands), and sourdough bread. Including vinegar or lemon juice with your foods helps suppress a sharp rise in blood sugar."

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"It's really kind of zany how much a walnut half looks like a brain (albeit a nutty, crunchy, delicious brain!). The human brain is made up of about 60% of what is called "structural fat" and needs high-quality fats like omega-3s to function properly by keeping the brain fluid and flexible. Walnuts are loaded with omega-3s, which make them the ultimate "brain food." Walnuts, the Ultimate Brain Food

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  • 4 months later...
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I think Campbell's sneaks MSG into its soups under another name.

 

I'd get organic broth, or better yet, make it myself. It's extremely easy to make chicken broth:

 

- A piece of chicken (preferably organic). If you like to minimize fat, use skinless breast of chicken.

- Pot of water

- Salt, pepper, maybe carrots, celery, parsley, parsnips, potatoes or other mild veg good for soup.

 

Boil the water. Wash and chop up any vegetables you are using. Put them in the boiling water. Put in some salt and pepper. Add the chicken.

 

Reduce heat and simmer until chicken is done (poke it with a fork, it should be tender).

 

Take the chicken out.

 

Broth is done. Eat it plain or with the chopped veg and cut up chicken, add rice, noodles, or cooked beans if you wish. (Good for leftover rice, noodles, or beans).

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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I'm hungry now

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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I agree with most of what you have to say, Shanti, and good nutrition is especially important in withdrawal.

 

However, peanuts are really not such a great idea. See the following article by Dr. Jim Mercola:

 

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/11/05/toxic-foods.aspx

 

Excerpt:

 

"You’ll also notice that peanuts are on the list. Peanuts are not only commonly contaminated with aflatoxin, a carcinogenic mold, but they will also distort your omega-3:6 ratio. A much better choice if you want to eat nuts are walnuts, as they will give you some beneficial omega-3...

 

A 1993 study demonstrated 24 different types of fungi that colonized the inside of the peanuts used in the report (Costantini, A. Etiology and Prevention of Atherosclerosis. Fungalbionics Series.1998/99). And this was after the exterior of the peanut was sterilized! So, when you choose to eat peanuts, not only are you potentially eating these molds, but also their mycotoxins. Incidentally, in the same study the examiners found 23 different fungi on the inside of corn kernels. That said, if you choose to plant your own garden in an attempt to avoid mycotoxin contamination of corn or peanuts, it does you no good if the seed (kernel) used to plant your garden is already riddled with mold."

 

Peanuts are also likely to include some MSG, especially the dry roasted kind.

 

I've been avoiding peanuts for several days now, and the tinnitus is getting better. Shortly after I quit taking Lexapro, at the height of food sensitivity, peanuts made me downright sick, along with dairy foods.

 

You're on the right track though, girlfriend. Eating well is the key to good health whether in withdrawal or not.

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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Peanuts are a very common food allergen.

 

I'm mildly allergic to them, peanut butter used to give me vague indigestion. Haven't eaten peanuts in many years.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

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Almond butter is a good substitute for peanut butter, although it's more expensive. Cashew butter is also available, although I haven't tried that yet. Forget soy butter. It tastes like lawn grass, and these days, anything made from soy is likely genetically modified unless it is labeled otherwise. Avoid soy products unless they're labeled "Certified Organic" or a statement that the food is not genetically modified (or genetically mangled, as I keep thinking of it).

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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My substitute is sunflower seed butter.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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Cashew butter is easy to make if you have a blender. Put in blender and turn on. :) Sometimes it seemed there wasn't enough oil in the cashews and I'd have to add a little cooking oil. Not sure why that would be the case sometimes and sometimes not. We used raw cashews.

 

Best wishes

Bub

2005 St John's Wort / 2006-2012 Lexapro 20mg, 2 failed attempts to stop, tapered over 4.5 months in early 2012

January 2013 started Sertraline, over time worked up to 100mg

July 2014 Sertraline dropped from 100mg to 75mg, held for six months, slower tapering until 2019 22 Dec 3.2mg

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2021 Some time in about Jan/Feb realised probably on more like 1.8mg and poss mixing error in making suspension; doses after 10 Feb accurate; 10 Feb 1.6mg; 7 Mar 1.4, continued monthly

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May 2022,0.1mg, now dropping 0.01mg per week

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Thank you Jemima and Alto about the information on peanuts and Campbells sneaking in MSG. That is good to know! And I had no idea some dry roasted peanuts could contain MSG.

 

I found Pecan Butter at the local health food store. It is excellent for the nervous system. Unfortunately, like Almond butter it is also more expensive. I can't eat nuts at all because I have diverticular disease so I have to have the nuts as butter.

Taper from Cymbalta, Paxil, Prozac & Antipsychotics finished June 2012.

Xanax 5% Taper - (8/12 - .5 mg) - (9/12 - .45) - (10/12 - .43) - (11/12 - .41) - (12/12 - .38)

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Almond butter is a good substitute for peanut butter, although it's more expensive. Cashew butter is also available, although I haven't tried that yet. Forget soy butter. It tastes like lawn grass, and these days, anything made from soy is likely genetically modified unless it is labeled otherwise. Avoid soy products unless they're labeled "Certified Organic" or a statement that the food is not genetically modified (or genetically mangled, as I keep thinking of it).

 

Jemima.. What about Tahini.. I love that on crackers. Also, are you looking for Almond Butter in out of the way places? I get mine at a local discount store for the same price they sell natural peanut butter.. $4 for 16 oz. Whole Foods is double.

 

Alto.. I would never have known that about adding MSG to peanut butter.. argh, I wonder if they use processing that strips the flavor.

 

Bubbles.. Great tip on Cashew butter. The broken pieces are relatively inexpensive by the pound, but buying the butter.. not so much. I'm going to try this. I mix and match, have some of each on whole rye crackers every day. Dunno if it helps, but it tastes delicious.

 

Schuyler

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 

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Wow, making cashew butter sounds like a good idea. Cashews are so delicious.

 

Schuyler, I don't know if they add MSG to peanut butter -- I don't eat it because I'm mildly allergic. Haven't looked at a peanut butter label in decades.

 

Shanti, sunflower seed butter is relatively inexpensive and still packed full of that good nuttiness.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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Jemima.. What about Tahini.. I love that on crackers. Also, are you looking for Almond Butter in out of the way places? I get mine at a local discount store for the same price they sell natural peanut butter.. $4 for 16 oz. Whole Foods is double.

 

I've only used Tahini once or twice and that was combined with other ingredients in some vegan recipes I tried. I've heard that it's very good, nutritionally speaking, but that's about all I know. I believe it's made from sesame seeds, and nuts and seeds are generally health-supporting foods.

 

There aren't any out of the way places where I live. This is Merck Pharma-land and it's littered with name-brand grocery stores, big box stores, shopping centers, fast food chains, ad nauseum. Suburbia at its finest. <_< I used to live in downtown Philadelphia and I miss wandering in and out of those odd nooks and crannies. Big Lots is about as out of the way as it gets here.

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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Alto.. I would never have known that about adding MSG to peanut butter.. argh, I wonder if they use processing that strips the flavor.

 

 

I don't think natural p.b. has MSG in it, just some brands of dry-roasted nuts. I haven't bought typical supermarket peanut butter in years, so I don't know what's in it aside from loads of sugar and/or high fructose corn syrup. I got a taste of some several years after using the natural stuff and it tasted just like those cookies my mother used to make, the kind where you drop a blob of batter onto a cookie sheet and mash it with a fork. Very sweet, and probably not at all good for one's health.

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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Alto.. I would never have known that about adding MSG to peanut butter.. argh, I wonder if they use processing that strips the flavor.

 

 

I don't think natural p.b. has MSG in it, just some brands of dry-roasted nuts. I haven't bought typical supermarket peanut butter in years, so I don't know what's in it aside from loads of sugar and/or high fructose corn syrup. I got a taste of some several years after using the natural stuff and it tasted just like those cookies my mother used to make, the kind where you drop a blob of batter onto a cookie sheet and mash it with a fork. Very sweet, and probably not at all good for one's health.

 

Yes.. I was not thinking of natural. I just bought some pasty Jif, and yuck. After the real stuff, I can't stand it anymore.

 

btw.. Sunflower seeds are good, and so are Pumpkin seeds!

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 

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  • 5 weeks later...
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Cashew butter is easy to make if you have a blender. Put in blender and turn on. :) Sometimes it seemed there wasn't enough oil in the cashews and I'd have to add a little cooking oil. Not sure why that would be the case sometimes and sometimes not. We used raw cashews.

 

Best wishes

Bub

 

Hi Bubbles.. I just saw this link, and thought I'd say thanks for the idea of making cashew butter. I did so and am still licking my fingers!

 

Nuts, Best and Worst

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 

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  • 9 months later...

I think Campbell's sneaks MSG into its soups under another name.

 

I'd get organic broth, or better yet, make it myself. It's extremely easy to make chicken broth:

 

- A piece of chicken (preferably organic). If you like to minimize fat, use skinless breast of chicken.

- Pot of water

- Salt, pepper, maybe carrots, celery, parsley, parsnips, potatoes or other mild veg good for soup.

 

Boil the water. Wash and chop up any vegetables you are using. Put them in the boiling water. Put in some salt and pepper. Add the chicken.

 

Reduce heat and simmer until chicken is done (poke it with a fork, it should be tender).

 

Take the chicken out.

 

Broth is done. Eat it plain or with the chopped veg and cut up chicken, add rice, noodles, or cooked beans if you wish. (Good for leftover rice, noodles, or beans).

 

Hi Alto,

 

Do you have an opinion on Aspertame?

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Aza,

 

Gia provided a couple of links today in Flower's thread. Thought you might be interested in those.

 

Thanks tezza,

 

This is what concerns me,

 

Milk industry, aspartame

 

Heres a Quote from http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FDA-2009-P-0147-0012...

 

IDFA and NMPF request their proposed amendments to the milk

standard of identity to allow optional characterizing flavoring

ingredients used in milk (e.g., chocolate flavoring added to milk) to

be sweetened with any safe and suitable sweetener--including non-

nutritive sweeteners such as aspartame. IDFA and NMPF state that the

proposed amendments would promote more healthful eating practices and

reduce childhood obesity by providing for lower-calorie flavored milk

products. They state that lower-calorie flavored milk would

particularly benefit school children who, according to IDFA and NMPF,

are more inclined to drink flavored milk than unflavored milk at

school. As further support for the petition, IDFA and NMPF state that

the proposed amendments would assist in meeting several initiatives

aimed at improving the nutrition and health profile of food served in

the nation's schools. Those initiatives include state-level programs

designed to limit the quantity of sugar served to children during the

school day. Finally, IDFA and NMPF argue that the proposed amendments

to the milk standard of identity would promote honesty and fair dealing

in the marketplace and are therefore appropriate under section 401 of

the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 341).

The petition acknowledges that the use of non-nutritive sweeteners

in optional characterizing flavoring

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Sardines 3x a week.

Egg yolks, as much as you want.

 

Those are good brain foods.

 

I don't eat peanut butter either. Nut butters cause me constipation yet I'm prone to overeating them, so I try not to eat them at all.

"Well my ship's been split to splinters and it's sinking fast
I'm drowning in the poison, got no future, got no past
But my heart is not weary, it's light and it's free
I've got nothing but affection for all those who sailed with me.

Everybody's moving, if they ain't already there
Everybody's got to move somewhere
Stick with me baby, stick with me anyhow
Things should start to get interesting right about now."

- Zimmerman

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Organic chicken liver, I love that one too.

"Well my ship's been split to splinters and it's sinking fast
I'm drowning in the poison, got no future, got no past
But my heart is not weary, it's light and it's free
I've got nothing but affection for all those who sailed with me.

Everybody's moving, if they ain't already there
Everybody's got to move somewhere
Stick with me baby, stick with me anyhow
Things should start to get interesting right about now."

- Zimmerman

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I eat regular chicken liver once a week, are they ok?

 

I don't know that they're not but I am more at ease with the organic.

"Well my ship's been split to splinters and it's sinking fast
I'm drowning in the poison, got no future, got no past
But my heart is not weary, it's light and it's free
I've got nothing but affection for all those who sailed with me.

Everybody's moving, if they ain't already there
Everybody's got to move somewhere
Stick with me baby, stick with me anyhow
Things should start to get interesting right about now."

- Zimmerman

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  • Administrator

Gia's post about aspartame:

 

....

 

I'll share the posts about aspartame here. This is one about aspartame in general:

 

http://beyondmeds.com/2012/08/24/aspartame/

 

and then there is this nice recovery story about Jazz my friend who has now been drug free for several years and is doing GREAT:

 

http://beyondmeds.com/2011/09/07/offmedssuccess/

 

so hang on and let your body heal...you've just eliminated something that is likely to make a difference!

 

Personally, I avoid artificial sweeteners of all types.

 

I'd go for organic chicken livers or any kind of liver, definitely. Who knows what those commercially raised animals are being fed.

 

Good to hear you like those livers, alex!

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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