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Aully: Thinking about coming off trazodone. What is life like without it?


Aully

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Hello everyone new to the forums here. Just wanted to start off by asking a question that I hope someone with experience or knowledge about the topic could share information here.

 

I've been searching all over the Internet and every trazodone story is either about withdrawal symptoms or how it helps people, or how it's not helping anymore..

 

I wanted to ask a different question which is: AFTER withdrawals and a proper successful discontinuation, what is life like? Is it improved or worse due to less sleep?

More energy throughout the day?

Less foggy/groggy/slow mornings?

Don't need 2 cups of coffee to wake up?

Do you have more motivation now that you aren't on a drug with tranquilizing-like effects?

Less brain fog, faster response time etc?

 

Or what in your experience is it actually like?

 

It's very possible all those side effects I listed are unrelated to my trazodone usage but I genuinely think a lot of them are. (Not to mention physical sides)

I'm also taking Wellbutrin for about same amount of time as I've been on traz. Vyvanse/Ritalin for add.

 

My trazodone dosage is prescribed 150mg trapezoid shaped pills but I only take 50mg/night. Anyways I've been considering quitting trazodone to see if it helps. Basically all my side effects feel as though my add meds no longer help me like they used to. Do I just have a high tolerance to the add meds or is it possible the trazodone is holding me back? Trazodone has been such a weird drug for me that in the 7ish years I been on it I've never needed more than 50mg to get a solid 6-7 hours sleep. 8-12 depending on the situation but usually need 75-100mg for that amount of rest. That being said I only take 50mg that exact amount each night. I'm just curious if tapering off trazodone would improve my symptoms. If anyone has gone through this or similar please share your story I'd love to hear it.

 

At 25 and half at 195 pounds 6 ft tall, I consider myself in good physical condition and my depression is MUCH better than it has been in the past. Anxiety is basically nonexistent (unless extremely stressful life situation occurs). But even then the anxiety goes away and is strictly situation related. ADHD is the only thing that really affects my daily life. I have impulsive add - interrupt people while they talk unintentionally, distracted easily, forgetful, lose concentration easily etc. all much much improved when I take my vyvanse (70mg) and booster Ritalin 10mg in afternoons. Though the effectiveness isn't what it used to be after being on 70mg vyvanse for 3 years straight no dose increases.

 

Overall I wanted to hear your thoughts and if tapering trazodone might benefit me, or if my symptoms sound unrelated altogether. My goal is to get off the meds one by one taking it one step at a time starting with the trazodone, then Ritalin. Probably stay with vyvanse for a while as well as Wellbutrin (though I would like off that too in the future). Might try just tapering to 150mg wb and staying there a year or 2 and see how it goes.

 

Anyways sorry for the long post hope it helped give a good intro to my story. Interested to hear a success story from abandoning trazodone and what life is like after completely tapering off. Especially interested in hearing from long term traz users, 2-10 years or more. Thanks

Current daily meds:

Wellbutrin 300mg XL (BRAND-NAME ONLY) - 7 years

Trazodone 50mg - 7 years

Vyvanse 70mg - been on it since it came out, adderall 30 before.

Ritalin 10mg IR - 3 years

 

On hand: Valium 10mg (rarely take only for panic attacks 1-2x month or less).

Xanex 0.25mg (only for those rare moments - shorter duration)

 

WD history : lexapro 7 years ago, Ativan 5 years ago.

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  • Moderator Emeritus

Hi Aully, I am so sorry that we missed your intro, the forum os very busy and posts sometimes just slip off the first pages before we are aware ! 

 

You are taking a few drugs, and I have put them into the interactions checker for you, you might be shocked at the result but don't panic!

Your symptoms are unlikely to be down to one drug but to the combination. The thing is to decide which one to taper first.  Here is the list. 

Read through it then tell us what you are feeling might be the problem. 

 

nteractions between your selected drugs
Major bupropion  trazodone

Applies to: Wellbutrin (bupropion), trazodone

Talk to your doctor before using buPROPion together with traZODone. Combining these medications may increase the risk of seizures, which may occur rarely with either medication. In addition, buPROPion can increase the blood levels of traZODone, which may increase other side effects. You may be more likely to experience seizures with these medications if you are elderly, undergoing alcohol or drug withdrawal, have a history of seizures, or have a condition affecting the central nervous system such as a brain tumor or head trauma. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol during treatment. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Major bupropion  methylphenidate

Applies to: Wellbutrin (bupropion), Ritalin (methylphenidate)

BuPROPion may rarely cause seizures, and combining it with other medications that can also cause seizures such as methylphenidate may increase that risk. The interaction may be more likely if you are elderly, undergoing alcohol or drug withdrawal, have a history of seizures, or have a condition affecting the central nervous system such as a brain tumor or head trauma. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Major bupropion  lisdexamfetamine

Applies to: Wellbutrin (bupropion), Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine)

BuPROPion may rarely cause seizures, and combining it with other medications that can also cause seizures such as lisdexamfetamine may increase that risk. The interaction may be more likely if you are elderly, undergoing alcohol or drug withdrawal, have a history of seizures, or have a condition affecting the central nervous system such as a brain tumor or head trauma. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate alprazolam  bupropion

Applies to: Xanax (alprazolam), Wellbutrin (bupropion)

Excessive use of ALPRAZolam, or abrupt discontinuation following long-term use, may occasionally trigger seizures in patients taking buPROPion. Talk to your doctor before using these medications together if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate diazepam  bupropion

Applies to: Valium (diazepam), Wellbutrin (bupropion)

Excessive use of diazePAM, or abrupt discontinuation following long-term use, may occasionally trigger seizures in patients taking buPROPion. Talk to your doctor before using these medications together if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate alprazolam  trazodone

Applies to: Xanax (alprazolam), trazodone

Using ALPRAZolam together with traZODone may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate diazepam  trazodone

Applies to: Valium (diazepam), trazodone

Using diazePAM together with traZODone may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

No other interactions were found between your selected drugs.
Note: this does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. Always consult with your doctor or pharmacist.

Other drugs and diseases that your selected drugs interact with Interactions between your selected drugs and food
Moderate lisdexamfetamine  food

Applies to: Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine)

Using lisdexamfetamine together with alcohol can increase the risk of cardiovascular side effects such as increased heart rate, chest pain, or blood pressure changes. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with lisdexamfetamine. Let your doctor know if you experience severe or frequent headaches, chest pain, and/or a fast or pounding heartbeat. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate bupropion  food

Applies to: Wellbutrin (bupropion)

Using buPROPion with alcohol may increase the risk of uncommon side effects such as seizures, hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, mood and behavioral changes, depression, suicidal thoughts, anxiety, and panic attacks. On the other hand, sudden withdrawal from alcohol following regular or chronic use can also increase your risk of seizures during treatment with buPROPion. If you are prone to frequent or excessive alcohol use, talk to your doctor before starting buPROPion. In general, you should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with buPROPion. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate alprazolam  food

Applies to: Xanax (alprazolam)

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with ALPRAZolam and lead to potentially dangerous side effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Do not drink alcohol while taking ALPRAZolam. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol. You may feel more drowsy, dizzy, or tired if you take ALPRAZolam with alcohol. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate trazodone  food

Applies to: trazodone

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of traZODone such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with traZODone. Do not use more than the recommended dose of traZODone, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate diazepam  food

Applies to: Valium (diazepam)

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with diazePAM and lead to potentially dangerous side effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Do not drink alcohol while taking diazePAM. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol. You may feel more drowsy, dizzy, or tired if you take diazePAM with alcohol. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Switch to professional interaction data

Moderate methylphenidate  food

Applies to: Ritalin (methylphenidate)

Do not use alcohol or medications that contain alcohol while you are receiving treatment with methylphenidate. This may increase nervous system side effects such as drowsiness, anxiety, depression, and seizures. In addition, with certain long-acting forms of methylphenidate, alcohol can cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. High blood levels of the drug may increase the risk of side effects. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions on how to take this or other medications you are prescribed. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Therapeutic duplication warnings

Therapeutic duplication is the use of more than one medicine from the same drug category or therapeutic class to treat the same condition. This can be intentional in cases where drugs with similar actions are used together for demonstrated therapeutic benefit. It can also be unintentional in cases where a patient has been treated by more than one doctor, or had prescriptions filled at more than one pharmacy, and can have potentially adverse consequences.

Duplication Antidepressants

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'antidepressants' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'antidepressants' category:

  • trazodone
  • bupropion (active ingredient in Wellbutrin (bupropion))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication Psychotropic agents

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'psychotropic agents' category to be taken concurrently is usually three. Your list includes four medicines belonging to the 'psychotropic agents' category:

  • trazodone
  • diazepam (active ingredient in Valium (diazepam))
  • bupropion (active ingredient in Wellbutrin (bupropion))
  • alprazolam (active ingredient in Xanax (alprazolam))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs' category to be taken concurrently is usually three. Your list includes six medicines belonging to the 'Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs' category:

  • trazodone
  • methylphenidate (active ingredient in Ritalin (methylphenidate))
  • diazepam (active ingredient in Valium (diazepam))
  • lisdexamfetamine (active ingredient in Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine))
  • bupropion (active ingredient in Wellbutrin (bupropion))
  • alprazolam (active ingredient in Xanax (alprazolam))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication Cerebral stimulants

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'cerebral stimulants' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'cerebral stimulants' category:

  • methylphenidate (active ingredient in Ritalin (methylphenidate))
  • lisdexamfetamine (active ingredient in Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication Stimulants

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'stimulants' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'stimulants' category:

  • methylphenidate (active ingredient in Ritalin (methylphenidate))
  • lisdexamfetamine (active ingredient in Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication Tranquilizers

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'tranquilizers' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'tranquilizers' category:

  • diazepam (active ingredient in Valium (diazepam))
  • alprazolam (active ingredient in Xanax (alprazolam))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication Benzodiazepines

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'benzodiazepines' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'benzodiazepines' category:

  • diazepam (active ingredient in Valium (diazepam))
  • alprazolam (active ingredient in Xanax (alprazolam))

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

**I am not a medical professional, if in doubt please consult a doctor with withdrawal knowledge.

 

 

Different drugs occasionally (mostly benzos) 1976 - 1981 (no problem)

1993 - 2002 in and out of hospital. every type of drug + ECT. Staring with seroxat

2002  effexor. 

Tapered  March 2012 to March 2013, ending with 5 beads.

Withdrawal April 2013 . Reinstated 5 beads reduced to 4 beads May 2013

Restarted taper  Nov 2013  

OFF EFFEXOR Feb 2015    :D 

Tapered atenolol and omeprazole Dec 2013 - May 2014

 

Tapering tramadol, Feb 2015 100mg , March 2015 50mg  

 July 2017 30mg.  May 15 2018 25mg

Taking fish oil, magnesium, B12, folic acid, bilberry eyebright for eye pressure. 

 

My story http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/4199-hello-mammap-checking-in/page-33

 

Lesson learned, slow down taper at lower doses. Taper no more than 10% of CURRENT dose if possible

 

 

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  • 7 months later...

Any update?

Thought for the day: Lets stand up, and let’s speak out , together. G Olsen

We have until the 14th. Feb 2018. 

URGENT REQUEST Please consider submitting  for the petition on Prescribed Drug Dependence and Withdrawal currently awaiting its third consideration at the Scottish Parliament. You don't even have to be from Scotland. By clicking on the link below you can read some of the previous submissions but be warned many of them are quite harrowing.

http://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01651   

Please tell them about your problems taking and withdrawing from antidepressants and/or benzos.

Send by email to petitions@parliament.scot and quote PE01651 in the subject heading. Keep to a maximum of 3 sides of A4 and you can't name for legal reasons any doctor you have consulted. Tell them if you wish to remain anonymous. We need the numbers to help convince the committee members we are not isolated cases. You have until mid February. Thank you

Recovering paxil addict

None of the published articles shed light on what ssri's ... actually do or what their hazards might be. Healy 2013. 

This is so true, with anything you get on these drugs, dependance, tapering, withdrawal symptoms, side effects, just silent. And if there is something mentioned then their is a serious disconnect between what is said and reality! 

  "Every time I read of a multi-person shooting, I always presume that person had just started a SSRI or had just stopped."  Dr Mosher. Me too! 

Over two decades later, the number of antidepressant prescriptions a year is slightly more than the number of people in the Western world. Most (nine out of 10) prescriptions are for patients who faced difficulties on stopping, equating to about a tenth of the population. These patients are often advised to continue treatment because their difficulties indicate they need ongoing treatment, just as a person with diabetes needs insulin. Healy 2015

I believe the ssri era will soon stand as one of the most shameful in the history of medicine. Healy 2015

Let people help people ... in a natural, kind, non-addictive (and non-big pharma) way. J Broadley 2017

 

 

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