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Where are all the success stories? Does nobody ever heal?

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Evoldnahturt

My biggest concern once I started learning about this was figuring out why some people get worse seemingly out of nowhere and take many years to heal.  It seems like in some of those cases, they didn't understand what they were doing wrong, but would happen to mention it in a post as though that was unrelated to the problems they were currently experiencing.  Others claimed to be doing everything right and some of these people seemed to demonstrate an understanding of the lifestyle changes that were necessary to allow their bodies to heal.  I suspect that in the cases where people are doing the research to figure out how to treat this condition and are still getting sicker, they may inadvertently come into contact with chemicals that throw them off or they exercise a little too much one day or something similar that they have a difficult time linking to the progression of the condition.  Chemicals are all over the place, you can't avoid them.  We've dug up so much **** out of the ground and put it in everything.  I suspect that some people are so sensitive that it's a matter of time before they get too much contact with the wrong chemical.  It's probably more complicated than this, but this might be part of the explanation.  Nobody really knows for sure at this point, though.  All we have is anecdotal evidence and the evidence suggests that even in cases like yours, rowinghippy and Hellbutrin, people seem to eventually heal.  Typically in a year or two, but sometimes longer.  I have read of cases where people had seen no improvement and claimed that they one day woke up fully healed or healed over a relatively short period of time.  When I first found this community, I spent all of my free time for several months reading stories and posts so that I could recognize patterns and gain an understanding of what I could expect.  I do not regret the time I invested in this.  The truth is pretty scary, but not understanding what was happening to me was scarier.

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JoelRivard

Wait, if there are not many success stories then how do we know what most doctors are saying isn't true?

All of my docs - therapy, pysch, PCP and suboxone doc all seem to insist that since I still have some issues with anxiety/depression (not too bad but at times it's a pain in the ass) and I've been off venlaflaxine for 6 months that it is NOT protracted withdrawl but that I simply have a "mood disorder".

They are ALL telling me to try prozac since I used it as a bridge while tapering off Effexor and it seemed to work. At least the taper wasn't as bad as I though it would be. But now that I still notice some issues, while not nearly as bad as in Febuary, the fact that I still complain, they all keep saying to try prozac and that this extended withdrawal isn't real at all.

 

If only a small percentage of people who are struggling with extended withdrawal actually get better than how do we know that those people didn't have a mood disorder and got lucky and it went away by itself.

 

While the rest of us are thinking we are still healing but in reality have a disorder that needs medication?

I don't know weather to try Prozac or to keep waiting? I'm at 6 months.

What numbers are we basing things on? For example at 1 year out are most people doing much better or only a small amount? Or 2 years? If only a small percentage actually return to normal then wouldn't it be likely that protracted WD is more myth than real?

If I'm going to still notice mood problems for 6 months I'd rather just roll the dice with drugs. I mean, if I tried Prozac and it didn't help could I likely just stop using it and not get even worse?

My docs say people take that stuff like candy and never have any problems at all. They think I'm crazy just at how reluctant I am to try another SSRI drug because Effexor was a nightmare.

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Altostrata

Joel, if you read the topics in the Introductions forum, you will see people gradually recovering from withdrawal syndrome. Their symptoms change. They are not all depressed.

 

If you want to believe you have to take drugs, that is your decision. Your doctors cannot look into your mind and see what's going on in there. Your condition is subjective and only you can decide if whatever you're doing is making it better or worse. We're not here to convince you to go one way or the other.

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Evoldnahturt

Joel, I think you should spend a lot of time reading stories.  That's what convinced me.  It's possible you might not be sick enough yet to notice many similarities between their stories and what you've been experiencing.  If you're not convinced, keep listening to doctors and come back to read more stories as your condition progresses.  Also, if what you're experiencing isn't withdrawal syndrome, that doesn't mean drugs are the answer.  Most chronic health issues can be cured through lifestyle changes.  Even science is now begrudgingly admitting that mental health issues can be caused and cured by diet.  Cut out grains, dairy, and added sugar, exercise, stop adding new drugs and very slowly taper off of whatever you're on, don't have sex or jack off often, drink lots of water, get lots of sleep, etc.  Basically just get healthy.  You have to get deep with this stuff to heal yourself.  Most people don't want to treat their condition properly so they pop pills and make things worse.  It's up to you whether you want to postpone hell or be uncomfortable now to achieve happiness later.

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potions
Posted (edited)

 

 

On 5/15/2018 at 4:11 PM, JoelRivard said:

Wait, if there are not many success stories then how do we know what most doctors are saying isn't true?

All of my docs - therapy, pysch, PCP and suboxone doc all seem to insist that since I still have some issues with anxiety/depression (not too bad but at times it's a pain in the ass) and I've been off venlaflaxine for 6 months that it is NOT protracted withdrawl but that I simply have a "mood disorder".

They are ALL telling me to try prozac since I used it as a bridge while tapering off Effexor and it seemed to work. At least the taper wasn't as bad as I though it would be. But now that I still notice some issues, while not nearly as bad as in Febuary, the fact that I still complain, they all keep saying to try prozac and that this extended withdrawal isn't real at all.

 

If only a small percentage of people who are struggling with extended withdrawal actually get better than how do we know that those people didn't have a mood disorder and got lucky and it went away by itself.

 

While the rest of us are thinking we are still healing but in reality have a disorder that needs medication?

I don't know weather to try Prozac or to keep waiting? I'm at 6 months.

What numbers are we basing things on? For example at 1 year out are most people doing much better or only a small amount? Or 2 years? If only a small percentage actually return to normal then wouldn't it be likely that protracted WD is more myth than real?

If I'm going to still notice mood problems for 6 months I'd rather just roll the dice with drugs. I mean, if I tried Prozac and it didn't help could I likely just stop using it and not get even worse?

My docs say people take that stuff like candy and never have any problems at all. They think I'm crazy just at how reluctant I am to try another SSRI drug because Effexor was a nightmare.

Joel, I never had the issues I have now before I went on those horrendous, damaging pills (SSRIs), so I know that they are not “me” or caused by any “mental illness” I may have. They are caused by my brain having adapted to being on the pills

to accomodate the effects of the drug. Prozac poop out? The Prozac pill is always he same, it doesn’t poop out. It’s the brain that changes.

 

The pills changed my brain architecture, burned out my serotonin receptors, and messed up my nervous system. How do I know? These symptoms are so bizarre and different from what I’ve ever experienced before that I know they are not caused by my personality and *definitely* not caused by any mental “illnesses” I may have (which was a term coined while psychiatric drugs were being developed. People throughout history have had different opinions of people who have behavioral or emotional abnormalities. At one point they called them holy fools in Russia. At one point they were feared and tortured. Now, we call them mental “patients” and treat them with these horrible pills. What’s next?)

 

If you think this is you and not the damage caused by the pills, consider that the pills change your brain. With ssris in particular, the brain adapts to the constant flooding of serotonin by making the receptors less sensitive to the serotonin over time. So, if people don’t heal from this, that means that for some reason that damage (the receptor downregulation) does not go back to normal or some epigenetic change takes place that does not switch back in some people (as may be the case in people with PSSD who have numb genitals years after coming off the meds, sometimes decades, which would mean that long term epigenetic change takes place. If anyone has ever had their genitals feel like a slab of meat *before* taking any medications such as these, let us know.)

 

The brain changes in response to the horrendous damage these pills do. If you wish to call yourself mentally ill and continue damaging yourself with those *****, go for it. That is your own decision

 

Edited by Songbird
masked expletive

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potions

To add: brain injuries can sometimes be permanent. If a stroke victim is not the same as before and never heals, does that mean his symptoms are not caused by the stroke? No. Same with lobotomies. Doctors used to cut the brain which caused permanent personality changes and zombified people. Because that doesn’t improve over time, does that mean it’s the person’s “mental illness” and not caused by the lobotomy? No.

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JoelRivard
19 hours ago, Altostrata said:

Joel, if you read the topics in the Introductions forum, you will see people gradually recovering from withdrawal syndrome. Their symptoms change. They are not all depressed.

 

If you want to believe you have to take drugs, that is your decision. Your doctors cannot look into your mind and see what's going on in there. Your condition is subjective and only you can decide if whatever you're doing is making it better or worse. We're not here to convince you to go one way or the other.

I'm just asking questions.

I get that there are different stories, I have read them but the name of the thread is "why-arent-there-very-many-success-stories" so it's that stance that I'm asking the question from.

So you're saying that the thread title is not accurate and there are in fact many success stories?

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Madeleine
7 minutes ago, JoelRivard said:

I'm just asking questions.

I get that there are different stories, I have read them but the name of the thread is "why-arent-there-very-many-success-stories" so it's that stance that I'm asking the question from.

So you're saying that the thread title is not accurate and there are in fact many success stories?


I think one of the reasons there aren't more success stories is because once people are feeling well they don't want to come here and be reminded of their misery.

 

I agree with Evanhold that it's important to work on healing oneself with lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise. But, I think often there is more to it:  if someone is suffering from mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, it's important to figure out what it is in one's thinking/lifestyle, etc. that has contributed to one's condition and to deal with and solve those root causes with other non-drug treatments such a cognitive behavioural therapy.  

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JoelRivard
19 hours ago, Evoldnahturt said:

Joel, I think you should spend a lot of time reading stories.  That's what convinced me.  It's possible you might not be sick enough yet to notice many similarities between their stories and what you've been experiencing.  If you're not convinced, keep listening to doctors and come back to read more stories as your condition progresses.  Also, if what you're experiencing isn't withdrawal syndrome, that doesn't mean drugs are the answer.  Most chronic health issues can be cured through lifestyle changes.  Even science is now begrudgingly admitting that mental health issues can be caused and cured by diet.  Cut out grains, dairy, and added sugar, exercise, stop adding new drugs and very slowly taper off of whatever you're on, don't have sex or jack off often, drink lots of water, get lots of sleep, etc.  Basically just get healthy.  You have to get deep with this stuff to heal yourself.  Most people don't want to treat their condition properly so they pop pills and make things worse.  It's up to you whether you want to postpone hell or be uncomfortable now to achieve happiness later.

Yes I have been reading stories but again I'm just asking questions. The title of the thread is about there being a lack of success stories, are we just to ignore evidence against the idea of protracted WD and only look at evidence for it? Because yes there are positive stories, but then there is the thread title right there.

 

Regarding WD  I took over 1 year off from training and eating good then took 18 months of training and eating excellent, got shredded, have abs, cardio, am well built, eat lean protein, good carbs, healthy mix of fats, tons of vegtables, water, zero sugar, and I am glad to be in shape again. But it didn't help with the venlaflaxine WD at all.

Getting healthy is a good hobby and positive for many reasons and I know it does do wonders for brain chemistry but it really did nothing during my worst WD. In fact during my achey 6 weeks I had to stop training and it made no difference.

I recommend a healthy lifestyle I just can't say it will help with WD. It didn't do much for my state while on efexxor either. I took a winter off then got back into things and I struggled about the same with side-effects (low mood, some anxiety). Getting off the drug is the main thing.

I seem to be in a 3rd stage of WD which brings mild anxiety. Very annoying.

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JoelRivard
7 hours ago, potions said:

 

 

Joel, I never had the issues I have now before I went on those horrendous, damaging pills (SSRIs), so I know that they are not “me” or caused by any “mental illness” I may have. They are caused by my brain having adapted to being on the pills

to accomodate the effects of the drug. Prozac poop out? The Prozac pill is always he same, it doesn’t poop out. It’s the brain that changes.

 

The pills changed my brain architecture, burned out my serotonin receptors, and messed up my nervous system. How do I know? These symptoms are so bizarre and different from what I’ve ever experienced before that I know they are not caused by my personality and *definitely* not caused by any mental “illnesses” I may have (which was a term coined while psychiatric drugs were being developed. People throughout history have had different opinions of people who have behavioral or emotional abnormalities. At one point they called them holy fools in Russia. At one point they were feared and tortured. Now, we call them mental “patients” and treat them with these horrible pills. What’s next?)

 

If you think this is you and not the damage caused by the pills, consider that the pills change your brain. With ssris in particular, the brain adapts to the constant flooding of serotonin by making the receptors less sensitive to the serotonin over time. So, if people don’t heal from this, that means that for some reason that damage (the receptor downregulation) does not go back to normal or some epigenetic change takes place that does not switch back in some people (as may be the case in people with PSSD who have numb genitals years after coming off the meds, sometimes decades, which would mean that long term epigenetic change takes place. If anyone has ever had their genitals feel like a slab of meat *before* taking any medications such as these, let us know.)

 

The brain changes in response to the horrendous damage these pills do. If you wish to call yourself mentally ill and continue damaging yourself with those shits, go for it. That is your own decision

 

I get that. I'm just asking questions based on the thread title.

I'm trying to weigh evidence on both sides. My head brain doc at the suboxone clinic recently told me there is no chance that I'm still in WD after 6 months.

But then 4 weeks later showed me an article from the NY times that said a small percentage of people do suffer from extended WD?

Messes with my head.

But he still insists that prozac would alleviate my symptoms. I just don't know?

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JoelRivard
7 minutes ago, Madeleine said:


I think one of the reasons there aren't more success stories is because once people are feeling well they don't want to come here and be reminded of their misery.

 

I agree with Evanhold that it's important to work on healing oneself with lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise. But, I think often there is more to it:  if someone is suffering from mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, it's important to figure out what it is in one's thinking/lifestyle, etc. that has contributed to one's condition and to deal with and solve those root causes with other non-drug treatments such a cognitive behavioural therapy.  

I'm pretty sure that I'm still recovering from 10 years of Effexor and I agree that extended WD is a strong possibility.

Maybe people don't come back here when they are feeling better, sure. But can you see how that right there could also be a form of cognative bias? You are making up a reason that supports your idea.

I'm just trying to look at both sides. It's confusing when every professional tells me there is no such thing as protracted WD?? The doctors think all the stories are just anecdotal evidence that is misguided?

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potions

 

13 minutes ago, JoelRivard said:

I get that. I'm just asking questions based on the thread title.

I'm trying to weigh evidence on both sides. My head brain doc at the suboxone clinic recently told me there is no chance that I'm still in WD after 6 months.

But then 4 weeks later showed me an article from the NY times that said a small percentage of people do suffer from extended WD?

Messes with my head.

But he still insists that prozac would alleviate my symptoms. I just don't know?

Your head doc is wrong. Look all over this forum and you’ll find that most people are still suffering with severe withdrawal symptoms at 6 months off. That’s the early days. And there’s no evidence to weigh. The truth is that the pills were created for profit and are all scams. Multiple studies show they work no better than placebos, but that’s not what brainwashed doctors (who aren’t educated about withdrawal at all) are told. Also, from what I’ve read on here, reinstating after 6 months (especially at a standard dose which is too high for those of us in wd with sensitive nervous systems), is a bad bad idea. I’ve read of people who did that that far off and had horrible adverse reactions to it, making their symtpoms much, much worse and prolonging them. I think at this point it’s too late to reinstate and definitely too late to reinstate at a standard dose. But I am not a mod or a doctor, I’m just advising you based on what I’ve read on this site. I also believe that over time people get better and symptoms become less severe over time. I’d hang on and wait for the wd symptoms to get easier. They will.

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PSVT
On ‎3‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 3:41 PM, Evoldnahturt said:

"Is this my life now?  Am I going to have to commit suicide?". 

 

This ^^^^^.

 

Hard to push through!

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Evoldnahturt

These doctors are basing their opinions on research that's been largely corrupted.  The research says drugs are the answer for everything because drug companies are funding the research.  Most of the opinions you'll read here are unbiased.  We don't stand to gain a profit from lying to each other.  We're just trying to figure out wtf is going on.  The people that do continue to report their status over the years usually seem to heal over time.  I didn't keep track, but it seemed as though roughly 75% of the cases bad enough to make it here improved over time.  The ones that didn't either acknowledged that they did something stupid to screw themselves up, casually mentioned it in a post as though it was unrelated to their relapse, or didn't give us any indication as to why they relapsed or haven't improved.  I can't say I know for sure what's going on with those people, but after reading a lot of stories, it seems that if you're careful and do what you're supposed to do, your odds of recovery are good.  I believe most people in that last category either did something stupid and didn't tell us, were exposed to something random that they happened to have a really nasty reaction to, or are so sick it's going to take them much longer to recover than it will for many of us.  Some people may be sensitive enough that they just can't stay away from chemicals long enough to heal.  Again, I think for most (but not all) of us, the results are largely in our hands.  I suspect most people that develop this condition never even find the community.  We just see the worst cases, and even most of these people seem to heal over time.  The more time a person spends on this forum, the more likely their condition is unusually acute and chronic.  They aren't necessarily an example of what usually happens to people with this condition.

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PSVT
20 minutes ago, Evoldnahturt said:

These doctors are basing their opinions on research that's been largely corrupted.  The research says drugs are the answer for everything because drug companies are funding the research.

 

AND

 

20 minutes ago, Evoldnahturt said:

I suspect most people that develop this condition never even find the community.

 

On point!

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Evoldnahturt

My dad, uncle, and a friend of mine developed this condition.  My dad and uncle died of other, unrelated health issues shortly after and I never understood what the neurological stuff was about until it started happening to me.  They both kept going to different doctors and the doctors didn't understand what was going on.  My dad was actually a surgeon with a lot of connections and he couldn't find anyone that could help.  However, it also took him a while to figure out that part of his problem was leukemia and liver/kidney failure, which was surprising to me at the time.  Doctors aren't as capable of making diagnoses or effectively prescribing treatment as most people assume.  My point is, none of these people ever found the community.  Not even my friend who I've been begging to come here and learn about what's going on with her.  We've been conditioned to trust systems that want to rape us.

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Hellbutrin
1 hour ago, Evoldnahturt said:

These doctors are basing their opinions on research that's been largely corrupted.  The research says drugs are the answer for everything because drug companies are funding the research.  Most of the opinions you'll read here are unbiased.  We don't stand to gain a profit from lying to each other.  We're just trying to figure out wtf is going on.  The people that do continue to report their status over the years usually seem to heal over time.  I didn't keep track, but it seemed as though roughly 75% of the cases bad enough to make it here improved over time.  The ones that didn't either acknowledged that they did something stupid to screw themselves up, casually mentioned it in a post as though it was unrelated to their relapse, or didn't give us any indication as to why they relapsed or haven't improved.  I can't say I know for sure what's going on with those people, but after reading a lot of stories, it seems that if you're careful and do what you're supposed to do, your odds of recovery are good.  I believe most people in that last category either did something stupid and didn't tell us, were exposed to something random that they happened to have a really nasty reaction to, or are so sick it's going to take them much longer to recover than it will for many of us.  Some people may be sensitive enough that they just can't stay away from chemicals long enough to heal.  Again, I think for most (but not all) of us, the results are largely in our hands.  I suspect most people that develop this condition never even find the community.  We just see the worst cases, and even most of these people seem to heal over time.  The more time a person spends on this forum, the more likely their condition is unusually acute and chronic.  They aren't necessarily an example of what usually happens to people with this condition.

I really appreciate your stance on recovery. I’m 10 months out from a C/T and I’m in the middle of a panicky episode because of a dr visit I had today. My doctor flat out told me there is a potential possibility that I might have done some permanent damage to my brain. He also told me that because my periods have stopped entirely that there is an indication that I might have damaged my pituitary gland, and that is apparently difficult to reverse. I do truly hope that I haven’t done irreversible harm to myself by taking the medications in the first place. 

 

Needless to say, I really needed to see this reassurance today.

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Evoldnahturt

There are a lot of things that doctors believe or have believed are irreversible.  Heart disease, cancer, tooth enamel erosion, and many other health issues have been observed to have reversed in cases where lifestyle changes were made.  Maybe not in every case, but much of the time the damage that we do can largely be reversed or kept from progressing (or at least slowed down) if we dig our heels in and make the necessary changes.  My impression has been that in most cases, full or almost full recovery from most chronic diseases that are lifestyle-related may be likely if you really get serious about getting healthy.  Our bodies know what to do once we provide an environment in which it can heal itself.  It's really amazing how well it can perform this function.  It doesn't make fiscal sense for researchers to publish studies that suggest this when their funding is coming from a pharmaceutical company.  You can make a lot more money by keeping people sick and dependent on life-long treatment than you can by telling them to eat a salad.

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ProzacWasCreatedBySatan1
18 minutes ago, Hellbutrin said:

I really appreciate your stance on recovery. I’m 10 months out from a C/T and I’m in the middle of a panicky episode because of a dr visit I had today. My doctor flat out told me there is a potential possibility that I might have done some permanent damage to my brain. He also told me that because my periods have stopped entirely that there is an indication that I might have damaged my pituitary gland, and that is apparently difficult to reverse. I do truly hope that I haven’t done irreversible harm to myself by taking the medications in the first place. 

 

Needless to say, I really needed to see this reassurance today.

 

When I was 10 months out from my cold turkey, I literally had a constant rumination that I was permanently damaged every single day, and I feared that I would be a depersonalized mess for the rest of my life. That I would never have a day in my life worth actually living. 10 months was when I got slammed with the worst symptoms. I would say they were than acute withdrawal, because my body was tired of fighting. I was basically bed ridden most days, twitching around, and I would go unconscious after eating any meal because my histamine issues were so bad. 2 years off now I consider myself 80% of the way there. No more depersonalization or crazy disconnected from reality panic attacks. I work full time (from home) and all I have left are migraines from my job because I work on the computer... Which are getting better, and some exercise sensitivities. Which aren’t too bad. I still go to the gym 4 times a week. I hope this helps.

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Hellbutrin
10 hours ago, ProzacWasCreatedBySatan1 said:

 

When I was 10 months out from my cold turkey, I literally had a constant rumination that I was permanently damaged every single day, and I feared that I would be a depersonalized mess for the rest of my life. That I would never have a day in my life worth actually living. 10 months was when I got slammed with the worst symptoms. I would say they were than acute withdrawal, because my body was tired of fighting. I was basically bed ridden most days, twitching around, and I would go unconscious after eating any meal because my histamine issues were so bad. 2 years off now I consider myself 80% of the way there. No more depersonalization or crazy disconnected from reality panic attacks. I work full time (from home) and all I have left are migraines from my job because I work on the computer... Which are getting better, and some exercise sensitivities. Which aren’t too bad. I still go to the gym 4 times a week. I hope this helps.

Thank you so much, this does really help. Did you have anhedonia and lack of positive feelings as well? When would you say that the DP/DR started to go away for you?

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Altostrata

JoelRivard, it's hard enough to help people go off psychiatric drugs without having to deal with a site member who's contentious for the fun of it.

 

Please post questions about your own particular condition in your Introductions topic. I am sorry fate did not hand you a faster recovery.

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powerback
17 hours ago, JoelRivard said:

I'm pretty sure that I'm still recovering from 10 years of Effexor and I agree that extended WD is a strong possibility.

Maybe people don't come back here when they are feeling better, sure. But can you see how that right there could also be a form of cognative bias? You are making up a reason that supports your idea.

I'm just trying to look at both sides. It's confusing when every professional tells me there is no such thing as protracted WD?? The doctors think all the stories are just anecdotal evidence that is misguided?

Hi JR welcome to SA ,you ask valid questions .we live in a society that bows to authority and I've done this most my life but the last 2 years or more I've stopped .in medical school doctors are trained for a few hours on nutrition .science has caught up with most of these doctors training ,the fact that  there profession has a saying says a lot "Iatrogenic illness" .There's one ex GP from my home country of Ireland called Terry lynch google him .he couldn't look at he's patience in the face anymore ,there is a lot more GPs waking up the madness of meds than you think .psychiatry is probably one of the only "professions" that don't even scan or look at what they are trying to treat .we have a broken leg they x-ray it .

I'm not  disagreeing with anything you exactly say  but its an extremely complex issue .

 

I challenged my doctor on a lot of issues around meds and he got extremely defensive at times ,I challenged he's authority and  sensibilities ,they are not used to this .I believe there altruism is based in the correct place but the reality is very different .there was a statistic out last year that put the western world behind lower economic country's in the aspect of mental well being .the arrogance of the western world to think we have all the answers is shocking .we were not built to live under the pressures society has developed .  

 

If I was a sales man I'm going to push the benefits of my product to you .this is consumerism/capitalism .its a fact  drug reps dictate what ever med is coming from Big pharma and government lobbyists will get there issue pushed forward. The likes of all us are the drug trials because they get there drugs passed on very little evidence or time    .we simply do not live in democracy's like its portrayed and think we do .

 

Now I will be a little biased because I never wanted to end my life until I started to come off this medication ,it creates its own homeostasis in the brain. now I or others mite be more sensitive or have predisposition to the harms of these drugs but they've no way of knowing until its too late .in the future they mite ,I think there working on ways to test .but I've only heard anecdotal  articles on that .

 

Keep reading your body and become the expert on your body ,I don't know your age but we live in a time with extraordinary access to information so lap all this up  and never stop learning .

 

You've come to SA for a reason and I hope you find the help you need .

I know this mite seem like a rant to you but its just a tiny glimpse into how complex this issue is .

Take care .

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ProzacWasCreatedBySatan1
On 5/16/2018 at 7:58 AM, Hellbutrin said:

Thank you so much, this does really help. Did you have anhedonia and lack of positive feelings as well? When would you say that the DP/DR started to go away for you?

 

At about the 11/2 year mark. I still get some flashes of it, but it’s usually correlated with working overtime on my computer. I worked 48 hours last week, and felt pretty crummy. It’s really not all that bad when you know it’s not here to stay, and you will be alright when you wake up. I remember when it was every day though, and it was nothing short of torture. I compared it to being waterboarded all day, and trying to hold a straight face like nothing is wrong. I promise it does get better. I have a really messy history, and even I am improving :)

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Altostrata
2 minutes ago, Altostrata said:

Please consider this: The Internet is a big place. Anxiety drives people to search for answers on the Web. When someone finds they are recovering from PSSD or other withdrawal symptoms, the motivation to post about the recovery anywhere diminishes. They get involved in other activities.

 

It's very possible that any desperate post from some time back is from a person who has recovered. The Internet being what it is, very often you can't reach that person again to find out how they recovered.

 

For example, for several years this person posted profoundly gloomy reports on PaxilProgress, a site that has disappeared. He full recovered from a range of withdrawal symptoms including PSSD.

 

On the other hand, people who are very frustrated by their symptoms are motivated to post more. They may drive themselves to higher and higher levels of despair and anxiety. These posts are vivid and memorable.

 

While we encourage people to come back and report success stories, not many do. However, by following Introductions topics, we see people recovering -- although slowly -- all the time.

 

Therefore, we don't believe "no one ever recovers" is true, and if you keep on repeating it here, you may be asked to stop it. While you're hurting yourself, you're also unnecessarily frightening other people.

 

 

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servadei

It is true that there aren't many success stories because as soon as you get your life back you don't really think about this site. I've cold turkeyed in 2015 and it was the worst thing that ever happened to me. It was an absolute nightmare, and there aren't really words to describe it. Today I'm in second year of college.. I still have a lot of problems and I don't feel normal, but it is nowhere near that nightmare. I randomly remembered how much it helped me to read success stories, hell, I would spend hours here reading the same ones over and over again. So I'm hoping this will give at least a bit of reassurance for whoever is reading this. You're all in my prayers tonight. And remember: you are way stronger and resilient than you think. 

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Dan998

Yes. It is important to remember that many people don't come back when they have recovered as they just want to put the whole experience behind them and get on with their lives. 

 

I myself dissappared 'off the radar' when I finished my taper and started to feel better. It was only because of suffering a particularly bad wave that I came back. Otherwise, I would have disappeared over the horizon, never to be seen again.

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Hellbutrin
44 minutes ago, Dan998 said:

Yes. It is important to remember that many people don't come back when they have recovered as they just want to put the whole experience behind them and get on with their lives. 

 

I myself dissappared 'off the radar' when I finished my taper and started to feel better. It was only because of suffering a particularly bad wave that I came back. Otherwise, I would have disappeared over the horizon, never to be seen again.

I'm just so scared that things like my memory and general enjoyment of life are going to continue to be dampened. I haven't seen any improvement in my memory at all. So I'm just wondering if this is an area that starts to break up in windows and waves or if it gradually improves. 

 

I can't wait until I don't "need" this site anymore. I'm sure I will continue to return after I feel better (I SO HOPE THIS HAPPENS) so that I can provide encouragement and support to those that continue to struggle. The intrusive thoughts, continued inability to feel any positive emotions, and constant feelings of dread are the areas that I can't wait to see go. 

 

I know that C/T often take much longer to heal, so I realize that I've pretty much set myself up to struggle for a significant amount of time. But I hope that I can see at least some relief soon. 

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Hellbutrin
1 hour ago, servadei said:

It is true that there aren't many success stories because as soon as you get your life back you don't really think about this site. I've cold turkeyed in 2015 and it was the worst thing that ever happened to me. It was an absolute nightmare, and there aren't really words to describe it. Today I'm in second year of college.. I still have a lot of problems and I don't feel normal, but it is nowhere near that nightmare. I randomly remembered how much it helped me to read success stories, hell, I would spend hours here reading the same ones over and over again. So I'm hoping this will give at least a bit of reassurance for whoever is reading this. You're all in my prayers tonight. And remember: you are way stronger and resilient than you think. 

Hi Servadei,

 

Thanks so much for the words of encouragement. I do appreciate the reassurance that this does eventually get better.

 

It's so hard to believe that there will be an end to all of this suffering when you go day after day without getting any relief. I don't get any enjoyment out of life, and depression constantly looms over me with a foreboding feeling of dread, and my memory is totally shot. I think that is so hard for me because I'm not familiar with feeling depression like this, I was taking Wellbutrin for anxiety, not for depression. I've had times in my life where I was down or upset, but they were always fleeting and I could always get myself out of whatever funk I was in. This is completely different. I feel terrible %100 of the time. 

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Rabe

You've come SO far Hellbutrin!  I thought what Alto wrote is true...and I believe that you will fully recover with time....you are already so much improved from so many of your earlier posts!!!  Take care!!

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Hellbutrin
3 hours ago, Rabe said:

You've come SO far Hellbutrin!  I thought what Alto wrote is true...and I believe that you will fully recover with time....you are already so much improved from so many of your earlier posts!!!  Take care!!

Thanks Rabe, I’m so thankful for your kind words. It’s heartening to hear that I seem better even if I don’t necessarily feel better. Maybe that means that I am undergoing slow and subtle changes and I’m just not noticing them. Thanks again

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Rabe

I truly believe it does mean that!!! :) 

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Liamb123456

I cold turkey off Zoloft 50mg 9 months out and I feel worse now than I did at start it's mostly mentally I feel like my brain is shutting.. is the normal at 9 months out can get worse later your off meds please can any help me 

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servadei
3 minutes ago, Liamb123456 said:

I cold turkey off Zoloft 50mg 9 months out and I feel worse now than I did at start it's mostly mentally I feel like my brain is shutting.. is the normal at 9 months out can get worse later your off meds please can any help me 

Yes. It is totally normal. I felt really really bad at that time too. 

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Liamb123456
1 minute ago, servadei said:

Yes. It is totally normal. I felt really really bad at that time too. 

Hey thanks for the reply did you ct meds also it's like my brain has no interest in watching television or it's like wen I'm watch I can't understand what's going on we're you like that 

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Liamb123456
On 5/22/2018 at 5:43 AM, Hellbutrin said:

Thanks Rabe, I’m so thankful for your kind words. It’s heartening to hear that I seem better even if I don’t necessarily feel better. Maybe that means that I am undergoing slow and subtle changes and I’m just not noticing them. Thanks again

Hey what's you still suffering with since your cold turkey.. I cold turkey 9 months ago and feel like I'm getting worse 

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Hellbutrin
2 hours ago, Liamb123456 said:

Hey what's you still suffering with since your cold turkey.. I cold turkey 9 months ago and feel like I'm getting worse 

Yes, I'm at 10.5 months out and I'm still having a really rough time. I haven't seen any improvement in my lack of positive feelings, my depression, or my memory loss. I'm just hoping that the reassurance that it improves over time is true. I guess we don't have any choice but to keep holding on. 

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