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zolo89: trying to get off psych meds because of sleep / bad short term memory

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zolo89
Posted (edited)

This is a log from 5/29/2019 to 5/31/2019

5/29/2019

11:13am – woke up feeling normal

11:13 am – 11:53am free time / listening to music feeling normal

11:53am – 12:24pm math studying

Feeling normal

1:19pm – 3:49pm nap

3:49pm – 5:09pm picking up relative feeling normal

 [6pm meds

Clozaril 100mg

Haldol (1)

Propranolol (1)

Amantadine (1)

Glilpizide (2)

Metformin (2) 1000mg each

Expecting to go to sleep in 2 hrs – feeling normal]

 – 9pm hour sleep

 

 

5/30/2019

10:21 am woke up – feeling tired / normal

12:04pm music listening / YouTube – feeling normal / sleepy

1:28pm feeling mildly tired

5:46pm – meds same as yesterday

7pm – 9pm sleep

 

 

5/31/2019

11:06am – woke up – feeling normal / free time / music

7:52pm – feeling tired haven’t taken meds

8:41pm meds same as yesterday – feeling a little to mildly tired

10:43pm sleep

 

Edited by ChessieCat
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zolo89

Hi,

I ended up seeing my new doctor for the first time. She said that's she's open to getting me off the meds / getting me on a very low dose (I told her that I wanted to get off / be on a very low dose). I'm in the meanwhile going to try to get off of them period with help from this forum.

 

Thanks.

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zolo89

I've also noticed that even when I take one 100mg Clozaril. I don't awaken automatically at 5 am anymore (which I need to awaken by). Should I take less of it (1/2 of one 100mg pill)? I've been taking one 100mg since January or February.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

Your log says you feel "normal" all the time. What does this mean to you?

 

Very good to hear you've found a doctor who will help you minimize drugs. If I were you, I'd work on the worst drug-drug interactions here

 

You can print out the drug interactions and take them to your doctor for discussion.

 

I would change only one drug at a time, and very gradually. This will be a long-term project. You are on a very extensive and probably unnecessary drug cocktail. Minimizing your drugs is much better for you in the long run.

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zolo89
On 6/7/2019 at 2:43 PM, Altostrata said:

Your log says you feel "normal" all the time. What does this mean to you?

 

Very good to hear you've found a doctor who will help you minimize drugs. If I were you, I'd work on the worst drug-drug interactions here

 

You can print out the drug interactions and take them to your doctor for discussion.

 

I would change only one drug at a time, and very gradually. This will be a long-term project. You are on a very extensive and probably unnecessary drug cocktail. Minimizing your drugs is much better for you in the long run.

 

What "normal" feels to me is thinking about / doing the listed activities. An example could be feeling positive and just enjoying that activity (example music/youtube) etc... If you have any more questions/need more details just respond back.

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Altostrata

Seems to me you could work with your new doctor to very gradually reduce either of these first:

 

On 2/9/2019 at 1:38 PM, ChessieCat said:

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'antipsychotics' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'antipsychotics' category:

  • clozapine
  • haloperidol 

 

We don't have specific tapering tips for either of these, but this will give you the idea Why taper by 10% of my dosage?

 

How to cut up tablets or pills

Which tablets or pills may be split or crushed?

Using an oral syringe and other tapering techniques
 
How to make a liquid from tablets or capsules

Compounding pharmacies (US, UK, and elsewhere)
 

You'll have to check which of your drugs can be prescribed as a liquid to taper -- ask your pharmacist.

 

Combining tablets or capsules with liquid to taper

 

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zolo89
1 hour ago, Altostrata said:

Seems to me you could work with your new doctor to very gradually reduce either of these first:

 

 

We don't have specific tapering tips for either of these, but this will give you the idea Why taper by 10% of my dosage?

 

How to cut up tablets or pills

Which tablets or pills may be split or crushed?

Using an oral syringe and other tapering techniques
 
How to make a liquid from tablets or capsules

Compounding pharmacies (US, UK, and elsewhere)
 

You'll have to check which of your drugs can be prescribed as a liquid to taper -- ask your pharmacist.

 

Combining tablets or capsules with liquid to taper

 

I'll talk to the doctor about that. I had a 60 minute meeting because it was an intro. The next meeting (on the 3rd of July) is only 20 minutes. So I'll ask the doctor about that.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

Your doctor may want to assist with a very gradual taper because none of us want you back in the hospital.

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zolo89
On 6/10/2019 at 8:25 PM, Altostrata said:

Your doctor may want to assist with a very gradual taper because none of us want you back in the hospital.

 

I ended up sleeping last night (light to medium) without my meds because I forgot to take them. I took melatonin instead. Is / are there any guides on how to sleep with melatonin?

 

Thanks.

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zolo89
On 6/13/2019 at 2:38 PM, Altostrata said:

I didn't take my medication at all that night. Also I took 150mg of clazaril with the rest of the drugs [Friday the 28th of June 2019] and thought it would make me sleep longer. I ended up sleeping just as if taking 1 100mg clozaril with the other drugs. I might just stay on the 1 100mg clozaril until I see my doctor (which I'm seeing July 3rd). I'm also reading a book called How to get off psychoactive drugs by a person named James Harper. Is this a good book to read. Also it's free online legally.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

James Harper wrote that book to sell his supplements. We do not recommend his supplement program.

 

Since your drug list is so long and complex, I'd appreciaten it if you'd list the drugs you took or did not take for each of the days you mentioned.

 

Some of your drugs have very long half-lives, so skipping one day might not have a big effect. However, not taking the drugs regularly may cause very bad symptoms that might be mistaken by a doctor or hospital as an increase in your psychiatric disorder and cause them to put you on even more drugs.

 

Gradual, systematic reduction of one drug at a time is the safest way for you to minimize your drugs. Please don't do anything daring -- such as skip your drugs -- we don't want to see you go back to the hospital. We'd much rather see you feeling well on minimal drugs.

 

Did you discuss the drug interactions report ChessieCat so helpfully provided with your doctor?

 

On 2/9/2019 at 1:38 PM, ChessieCat said:

I've done the drugs interaction for all of your drugs in 2 different interaction checkers and posted the results below.

 

 

From https://reference.medscape.com/drug-interactionchecker

Monitor Closely

  • haloperidol + propranolol

    haloperidol will increase the level or effect of propranolol by affecting hepatic enzyme CYP2D6 metabolism. Use Caution/Monitor. If concurrent use cannot be avoided, cautious dosing and telemetric monitoring is advised. Coadministration of beta-blockers and haloperidol may cause an unexpected severe hypotensive reaction.

  • clozapine + haloperidol

    clozapine and haloperidol both increase antidopaminergic effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clonazepam + clozapine

    clonazepam and clozapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clonazepam + haloperidol

    clonazepam and haloperidol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clozapine + haloperidol

    clozapine and haloperidol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • haloperidol + clozapine

    haloperidol and clozapine both increase QTc interval. Use Caution/Monitor.

 

EDITED TO ADD:

  • propranolol + glipizide

    propranolol decreases effects of glipizide by pharmacodynamic antagonism. Use Caution/Monitor. Non selective beta blockers may also mask the symptoms of hypoglycemia.

  • lisinopril + glipizide

    lisinopril increases effects of glipizide by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lisinopril + metformin

    lisinopril increases toxicity of metformin by unspecified interaction mechanism. Use Caution/Monitor. Increases risk for hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis.

  • clozapine + metformin

    clozapine, metformin. Other (see comment). Use Caution/Monitor. Comment: Atypical antipsychotics have been associated with hyperglycemia that may alter blood glucose control; monitor glucose levels closely.

  • clozapine + glipizide

    clozapine, glipizide. Other (see comment). Use Caution/Monitor. Comment: Atypical antipsychotics have been associated with hyperglycemia that may alter blood glucose control; monitor glucose levels closely.

 

EDITED TO ADD:

 

No additional interaction found using this checker for Depakote

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

From drugs.com

Interactions between your drugs

Major

haloperidol cloZAPine

Applies to: haloperidol, clozapine

Talk to your doctor before using cloZAPine together with haloperidol. CloZAPine can occasionally cause serious cardiovascular side effects such as low blood pressure and cardiac or respiratory arrest, and the risk may be greater in patients that are also receiving medications like haloperidol. Cardiovascular side effects are most likely to occur when cloZAPine is first started, when it is restarted following an interruption in therapy, or when the dose is increased rapidly. The risk and/or severity of other side effects may also be increased, including dizziness, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, dry mouth, abdominal cramping, constipation, difficulty urinating, heat intolerance, palpitation, irregular heart rhythm, Parkinson-like symptoms, and abnormal muscle movements involving primarily the face and sometimes the limbs. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. Let your doctor know if you experience increased or excessive side effects at any time during treatment with these medications, and seek immediate medical attention if you develop sudden dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, shortness of breath, or fast or pounding heartbeats. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. If you miss your cloZAPine doses for two or more days, contact your doctor before you resume treatment, as you may need to restart at a lower dose. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

haloperidol propranolol

Applies to: haloperidol, propranolol

Using haloperidol together with propranolol may cause low blood pressure. Contact your doctor if you experience fainting, dizziness or feeling like you might pass out, especially when getting up from a sitting or lying position. If your doctor does prescribe these medications together, you may need a dose adjustment or special test to safely use both medications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

clonazePAM lisinopril

Applies to: clonazepam, lisinopril

Lisinopril and clonazePAM may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

haloperidol lisinopril

Applies to: haloperidol, lisinopril

Haloperidol and lisinopril may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

clonazePAM cloZAPine

Applies to: clonazepam, clozapine

Using clonazePAM together with cloZAPine may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

amantadine cloZAPine

Applies to: amantadine, clozapine

Using amantadine together with cloZAPine may increase side effects such as dry mouth, constipation, difficulty urinating, heat intolerance, confusion, and blurred vision. More severe side effects may rarely include hallucinations, seizures, irregular heart rhythm, and heat stroke. Side effects may be more likely to occur in the elderly or those with a debilitating condition. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring to safely use both medications. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

propranolol cloZAPine

Applies to: propranolol, clozapine

CloZAPine and propranolol may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

propranolol clonazePAM

Applies to: propranolol, clonazepam

Propranolol and clonazePAM may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

haloperidol clonazePAM

Applies to: haloperidol, clonazepam

Using haloperidol together with clonazePAM may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

haloperidol amantadine

Applies to: haloperidol, amantadine

Using amantadine together with haloperidol may increase side effects such as dry mouth, constipation, difficulty urinating, heat intolerance, confusion, and blurred vision. More severe side effects may rarely include hallucinations, seizures, irregular heart rhythm, and heat stroke. Side effects may be more likely to occur in the elderly or those with a debilitating condition. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring to safely use both medications. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

cloZAPine lisinopril

Applies to: clozapine, lisinopril

CloZAPine and lisinopril may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Drug and food interactions

Moderate

haloperidol food

Applies to: haloperidol

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of haloperidol such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with haloperidol. Do not use more than the recommended dose of haloperidol, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

propranolol food

Applies to: propranolol

Food can enhance the levels of propranolol in your body. You shoud take propranolol at the same time each day, preferably with or immediately following meals. This will make it easier for your body to absorb the medication. Avoid drinking alcohol, which could increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking propranolol. Propranolol is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

 

Moderate

cloZAPine food

Applies to: clozapine

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of cloZAPine such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with cloZAPine. Do not use more than the recommended dose of cloZAPine, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

lisinopril food

Applies to: lisinopril

It is recommended that if you are taking lisinopril you should be advised to avoid moderately high or high potassium dietary intake. This can cause high levels of potassium in your blood. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking lisinopril, unless your doctor has told you to.

 

Therapeutic duplication warnings

Therapeutic duplication is the use of more than one medicine from the same drug category or therapeutic class to treat the same condition. This can be intentional in cases where drugs with similar actions are used together for demonstrated therapeutic benefit. It can also be unintentional in cases where a patient has been treated by more than one doctor, or had prescriptions filled at more than one pharmacy, and can have potentially adverse consequences.

Duplication
Duplication

UPDATED   Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs' category to be taken concurrently is usually three. Your list includes five medicines belonging to the 'Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs' category:

  • amantadine
  • clozapine
  • clonazepam
  • haloperidol
  • Depakote (divalproex sodium)

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Antipsychotics

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'antipsychotics' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'antipsychotics' category:

  • clozapine
  • haloperidol

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

 
EDITED TO ADD:
 
Moderate

glipiZIDE metFORMIN

Applies to: glipizide, metformin

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

MONITOR: Coadministration of metformin with an insulin secretagogue (e.g., sulfonylurea, meglitinide) or insulin may potentiate the risk of hypoglycemia. Although metformin alone generally does not cause hypoglycemia under normal circumstances of use, the added therapeutic effect when combined with other antidiabetic agents may result in hypoglycemia. The risk is further increased when caloric intake is deficient or when strenuous exercise is not compensated by caloric supplementation.

MANAGEMENT: A lower dosage of the insulin secretagogue or insulin may be required when used with metformin. Blood glucose should be closely monitored, and patients should be educated on the potential signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia (e.g., headache, dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness, confusion, tremor, hunger, weakness, perspiration, palpitation, tachycardia) and appropriate remedial actions to take if it occurs. Patients should also be advised to take precautions to avoid hypoglycemia while driving or operating hazardous machinery.

 

Moderate

cloZAPine metFORMIN

Applies to: clozapine, metformin

CloZAPine may interfere with blood glucose control and reduce the effectiveness of metFORMIN and other diabetic medications. Monitor your blood sugar levels closely. You may need a dose adjustment of your diabetic medications during and after treatment with cloZAPine. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

glipiZIDE lisinopril

Applies to: glipizide, lisinopril

Lisinopril can increase the effects of glipiZIDE and cause your blood sugar levels to get too low. Symptoms of low blood sugar include headache, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, hunger, tremor, weakness, sweating, and fast or pounding heartbeats. Talk with your doctor before using these medications together. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring of your blood sugar if you have been using glipiZIDE and are starting treatment with lisinopril. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

cloZAPine glipiZIDE

Applies to: clozapine, glipizide

CloZAPine may interfere with blood glucose control and reduce the effectiveness of glipiZIDE and other diabetic medications. Monitor your blood sugar levels closely. You may need a dose adjustment of your diabetic medications during and after treatment with cloZAPine. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

EDITED TO ADD:

 

Moderate

clonazePAM divalproex sodium

Applies to: clonazepam, Depakote (divalproex sodium)

Before taking clonazePAM, tell your doctor if you also use divalproex sodium. You may need dose adjustments or special tests in order to safely take both medications together. This combination may affect seizure control and cause drowsiness. You should avoid driving until you know how these medications will affect you. It is important that you tell your healthcare provider about all other medications that you are using including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using your medications without first talking to your doctor first.

 

Moderate

haloperidol divalproex sodium

Applies to: haloperidol, Depakote (divalproex sodium)

Using haloperidol together with divalproex sodium may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

divalproex sodium food

Applies to: Depakote (divalproex sodium)

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of divalproex sodium such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with divalproex sodium. Do not use more than the recommended dose of divalproex sodium, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

 

 

This is probably the most dangerous combination and might have caused your diabetes:

 

 

Quote

 

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'antipsychotics' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'antipsychotics' category:

  • clozapine
  • haloperidol

 

 

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zolo89

That night I didn't take any drugs at all just the melatonin.

 

My psychiatrist got me off of haldol and Clozapam.

 

When I asked why I couldn't get off of clozapine the doctor told me it was the best med for my disorder (which is schoeffective).  Can anyone give me any advice on how to convince my doctor to get me off / reduce clozapine?

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

How did you go off Haldol and clonazepam? When did you take it last? Did you feel any different afterward?

 

What drugs are you taking now, at what times of day and dosages?

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zolo89
19 minutes ago, Altostrata said:

How did you go off Haldol and clonazepam? When did you take it last? Did you feel any different afterward?

 

What drugs are you taking now, at what times of day and dosages?

The doctor told me that they (the doctor) wanted me to get off of Haldol and Clozapam because it was too much and not necessary. It's effective (getting off Haldol / clonazepam) today. I'm taking all of the drugs together just once at night. I'll make a log to let you (or anyone else) know.

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zolo89

Hi,

I'm making a handwritten log of my feelings. I'm feeling hyperactive and can't focus on doing reading for school (math / bio). I'm also lowly to midly depressed. I'll try to post the log tonight / tommorow. My doctor took me off haldol and klonopin without reducing them. The doctor just got me off it cold turkey. I'm going to try to use an audio file by a person named Jason Amend on youtube for ADHD.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata
23 hours ago, zolo89 said:

It's effective (getting off Haldol / clonazepam) today.

 

You went off Haldol and clonazepam cold turkey yesterday?

 

Of course you can't focus today, THOSE ARE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS -- you shouldn't be going cold turkey on any drug. Please immediately phone your doctor and get a month's prescription for 3/4 dosages of each drug.

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zolo89
43 minutes ago, Altostrata said:

 

You went off Haldol and clonazepam cold turkey yesterday?

 

Of course you can't focus today, THOSE ARE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS -- you shouldn't be going cold turkey on any drug. Please immediately phone your doctor and get a month's prescription for 3/4 dosages of each drug.

Thanks. I'm going to do that tommorow because my doctors place is closed. The only resource I would have is going to an emergency room. Which would mean overnight staying. I'm listening to a binural beat and it's made me feel a lot more better.  If you want me to I can dm it to you so you can analyze it. Also the doctor told me to make an appoitment with them in a month and the doctor told me to let them (the doctor) know my symptoms. I still feel anxious when going outside and talking / dealing with strangers.

 

Edit:

I'm still taking / making a log for today and maybe the next few days. I'm going to scan it because it's too much to type out.

 

Edit2: I have a full bottle of Haldol and I have some klonopin left (less than a week for klonopin).

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

If you want, you can link to a Google Doc. I don't want to download anything.

 

What is your drug schedule? Can you take half a Haldol tablet and half a Klonopin tablet? Cold turkey is not a good idea.

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zolo89

I think I'm just going to take the full meds and call my doctor tommorow. I have enough klonopin to last a few days and have enought haldol to last at least a month.

 

If you want to evaluate the sound just go to youtube and put "binaural beats schizophrenia" and click on the second one by subliminal hypnosis. I don't know how to do google docs.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

What is your drug schedule? Please take your drugs on schedule.

 

Your doctor should know better than to tell you to cold turkey. You might want to try a 25% reduction of ONE drug to start.

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zolo89

I'm going to take all of the drugs including haldol and klonopin. I asked the doctor for a refill of both and the doctor said I have to wait till Monday because the doctor is out of office. The doctor told me just to take Haldol [by itself along with the other drugs] but I'm not going to risk having side effects.

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Altostrata

Did you talk about tapering with your doctor? He or she should understand how to do this -- and only one drug at a time!!

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zolo89
On 7/5/2019 at 4:32 PM, Altostrata said:

Did you talk about tapering with your doctor? He or she should understand how to do this -- and only one drug at a time!!

 

I just talked to the doctor less than 30 minutes ago [on the phone]. The doctor said I can cut the klonopin in half and take it along with the other meds. The doctor refused to give me a new prescription / refill for the klonopin. The doctor was in my opinion in a hurry and when I mentioned tapering down the doctor suggested the above. I only have one physical pill left (of klonopin) and don't know how this is going to affect my sleep / psych problems. I'm going to try to get online / physical support. The doctor said it's at such a low dose that over the two days my body will get used to being without it. I'm going to meet with the doctor physically in two weeks on the 22nd of this month.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

If I were you, I'd find a new doctor. This one doesn't know how to taper.

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zolo89
On 7/8/2019 at 3:53 PM, Altostrata said:

If I were you, I'd find a new doctor. This one doesn't know how to taper.

Should I try to find a new doctor within the same office? The reason I'm asking is that I don't drive and it's near me. How should I ask for a new doctor?

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

Touchy situation. If your only choice is that one office, you'll have to find someone who is willing to learn how to taper psychiatric drugs. You can't go off them in a couple of days, everybody should know that by now. And all doctors should know you change only one drug at a time.

 

Maybe you can print this out about tapering the benzodiazepine (Klonopin) https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/1101/p606.html

 

Personally, I would taper the Haldol first, as discussed here

 

Perhaps you can have a phone conversation with this doctor and say you'll feel safer with a much more gradual taper. Maybe you can work something out, or you can ask him or her if a colleague in the same office would be more knowledgeable about how to do this.

 

Please read all the posts and links we give you. We're trying to help but it's not going to work unless you do the reading.

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zolo89

I just took my last amount of Klonopin. It didn't have an effect on me. I'm going to ask them if they could refill the klonopin. The doctor was also hesitant to get me off of the clozaril. The last time I was on the phone with the doctor the doctor wouldn't refill / represcribe the klonopin. I'll ask at  the meeting about tapering if the doctor doesn't want to do it I'll ask for a different doctor.

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Altostrata

Did you show this doctor your drug interactions report?

 

You may have to get all your prescriptions filled as usual and handle the tapering yourself. Sorry.

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zolo89
13 hours ago, Altostrata said:

Did you show this doctor your drug interactions report?

 

You may have to get all your prescriptions filled as usual and handle the tapering yourself. Sorry.

Yeah. Do you know any resources I already printed the ashton manual. It's (the manual) very confusing for me.

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

What did your doctor say about the drug interactions report?

 

Don't worry about tapering the benzo for now. We can coach you with that. If I were you, I'd gradually eliminate one of your two antipsychotics. But we're all about tapering here, so whatever you do, we would caution you not to suddenly stop any drug, none of this "cut a tablet in half and stop" nonsense.

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zolo89
1 hour ago, Altostrata said:

What did your doctor say about the drug interactions report?

 

Don't worry about tapering the benzo for now. We can coach you with that. If I were you, I'd gradually eliminate one of your two antipsychotics. But we're all about tapering here, so whatever you do, we would caution you not to suddenly stop any drug, none of this "cut a tablet in half and stop" nonsense.

I didn't show my doctor the report. Could you please link it for me so I can print it? Also I've been taking clozaril at 100mg a night for a few months and notice that I don't oversleep. I sleep light to deep depending on if I don't have an alarm. The reason I did this was because taking 200mg (2 pills) a night knocked me out for 12+ hours nightly. If I had taken it as directed I would have most likely failed my three college classes I was taking. Also can I get some advice on how to further taper clozaril? I'm going to read a book called Your drug may be your problem : how and why to stop taking psychiatric drugs from my library. My doctor refuses to refill my klonopin. Also when showing my doctor the report what's the most important thing to mention to the doctor?

 

Thanks.

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Altostrata

Click on this link

 

From drugs.com

 

Make sure the drugs are those you are currently taking. Edit the list if they are not. You'll have to figure out to print it out for your doctor, or give your doctor the link to look at.

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