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drugged: multiple drugs

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drugged
Posted (edited)

Supplements:

Flax oil - omega 3 fatty acids

Calcium - I don't consume milk

Vitamin D -  my D levels became low after menopause, even though I was living in southern Arizona and outside a lot.

Magnesium

Potassium

B-complex

Vitamin C  

 

That's a rough idea.  If you want doses I'll have to dig this stuff out.  My spouse puts out our supplements for both of us.  I've never experienced any adverse reactions to these supplements, not at the amounts I take and I don't take mega doses.

 

I used to do an hour of yoga 6 days a week but not for several years.  I'll check the archives to see which poses I can handle - I have old injuries in my upper back and arms that kind of limit me.  

 

Edited by ChessieCat
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manymoretodays
Posted (edited)

Hi drugged,

You are doing great, keeping in mind the move, new climate, new doctor, and financial issues........as well as attending to all the details that we are asking for.  You mentioned the cognitive/organizational difficulties and I just want to say that I think you are doing great in this regard........I mean here, online and all.

 

Most likely, not only did the increase of venlafaxine dose throw your CNS/ANS into turmoil.......this current syndrome of WD has too.

I mean stress becomes even more stress.  And then add in that darn agoraphobia.  And if often can feel truly unmanageable.  I think you are managing really quite well, all things considered.

 

Are you still going to try a 12 step group, on the ground?  And I'm sorry that therapy, with a therapist is now un-affordable.  It can take time, however, to find and establish a good relationship and growth experience with a therapist.  I mean it sure did for me.  I do a lot of mutual peer stuff too.......on the ground, which helps.

 

You might consider some of the online CBT or DBT too, in addition to some of the great stuff that Shep gave you.  I'll give you a couple links to look at.  Not ideal......I know, as I'm guessing you would like to try and get out more, which of course, presents it's own difficulties now, but here you go:

CBT Course:  An Introductory Self-Help Course in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Resources:  Centre for Clinical Interventions (PDF modules that you can work through, eg:  Depression, Distress Intolerance, Health Anxiety, Low Self-Esteem, Panic Attacks, Perfectionism, Procrastination, Social Anxiety, Worrying)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy(DBT) and Radical Acceptance

 

Hope this finds you well enough today.

L, P, H, and G,

mmt

Edited by manymoretodays
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ChessieCat
9 hours ago, Shep said:

If you're not sensitive to magnesium, you may want to take epsom salt baths to help with muscle pain and headaches. 

 

JanCarol sometimes uses a big bucket and does a foot soak.  You can also apply magnesium externally.

 

See these posts:

 

 

 

Unfortunately the links to the posts in Post #1 just return to Page 1 of the topic not to the specific post (we will try to fix this)

 

But for now: 

 

And this is the search result in the topic for spray.

 

And this is the search result in the topic for cream.

 

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drugged
20 hours ago, manymoretodays said:

Hi drugged,

You are doing great, keeping in mind the move, new climate, new doctor, and financial issues........as well as attending to all the details that we are asking for.  You mentioned the cognitive/organizational difficulties and I just want to say that I think you are doing great in this regard........I mean here, online and all.

 

Most likely, not only did the increase of venlafaxine dose throw your CNS/ANS into turmoil.......this current syndrome of WD has too.

I mean stress becomes even more stress.  And then add in that darn agoraphobia.  And if often can feel truly unmanageable.  I think you are managing really quite well, all things considered.

 

Are you still going to try a 12 step group, on the ground?  And I'm sorry that therapy, with a therapist is now un-affordable.  It can take time, however, to find and establish a good relationship and growth experience with a therapist.  I mean it sure did for me.  I do a lot of mutual peer stuff too.......on the ground, which helps.

 

You might consider some of the online CBT or DBT too, in addition to some of the great stuff that Shep gave you.  I'll give you a couple links to look at.  Not ideal......I know, as I'm guessing you would like to try and get out more, which of course, presents it's own difficulties now, but here you go:

CBT Course:  An Introductory Self-Help Course in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Resources:  Centre for Clinical Interventions (PDF modules that you can work through, eg:  Depression, Distress Intolerance, Health Anxiety, Low Self-Esteem, Panic Attacks, Perfectionism, Procrastination, Social Anxiety, Worrying)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy(DBT) and Radical Acceptance

 

Hope this finds you well enough today.

L, P, H, and G,

mmt

Hi many, 

I will be able to see the therapist twice a month.  I'd wanted to do once a week but my copay is too high.  I've an appointment with her September 4th.  This Monday, August 26th, I'll be meeting with my new primary care physician who has an interest in mental health issues and advocacy.  He also is more interested in whole mind-body health.  Keeping my fingers crossed that he'll be helpful.

 

The 12-step group is still on my to-do list.  I need to feel less physical ill to drag myself out for that. 

 

Right now just feeling pretty hopeless.

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ChessieCat
Just now, drugged said:

This Monday, August 26th, I'll be meeting with my new primary care physician who has an interest in mental health issues and advocacy.  He also is more interested in whole mind-body health.  Keeping my fingers crossed that he'll be helpful.

 

If they make any suggestions about changing, stopping, reducing your drugs, please post about them here before making any changes.

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drugged
3 hours ago, ChessieCat said:

 

If they make any suggestions about changing, stopping, reducing your drugs, please post about them here before making any changes.

I'm not making any changes even if they suggest it.  I'm planning on explaining my situation and what I'm currently doing and asking that they support me in the decisions I'm making.  I failed myself back when I agreed to go on an antidepressant in the first place and then all the added meds.  That cost me more than a third of my life.  Not making that mistake again.  

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ChessieCat

You might find it helpful to write a script and rehearse what you are going to say so that you can get what you need to taper.  Be calm, gentle but assertive.  You are the customer, it is your body.  Use words like I'd like to try this, or I'd prefer to do it this way.  If a suggestion is made that you don't want to follow, say I'd like to think about it before making a decision.

 

how-to-talk-to-a-doctor-about-tapering-and-withdrawal-what-to-expect

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drugged
Posted (edited)

Topic title:   New doctor, new diagnosis, new drug ...

 

Not really sure where to post this.

 

Went to see a new PCP.  First thing he tries to do?  Put me on another gabapentinoid (I told him I had terrible side effects from pregabalin) for the fibro and try me on a different antidepressant.  Because fibro and depression are for life.  When I tried to tell him about some of the side effects of the AD he immediately suggests I was misdiagnosed and I'm actually bipolar!  I told him the only episode of hypomania in my entire life started a couple weeks after a doc put me on Prozac and ended when I came off the drug. I offered him literature on the long-term effects of ADs and he refused it point blank and referred to those of us who find ourselves on this and similar forums as "those people." I ended up stating my intention to slowly taper off as many of the drugs in the cocktail as I could, one-by-one, starting with the AD.  Upshot is I'm still looking for a decent doctor.  

 

Edited by ChessieCat
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ChessieCat

Unfortunately this is not uncommon.  the-worst-of-doctors-threadstatements-that-defy-belief

 

I can't find it at this time, but member nz11 found a statement in the DSM (my words) something like once a person has been on a psychiatric drug that a new diagnosis can't be made.

 

nz11 did a lot of checking of the DSM.  This one is about the change in diagnosing bereavement depression:

 

On 1/3/2015 at 8:50 AM, nz11 said:

In DSM -V bereavement is a depressive disorder if it has lasted more than 2 weeks,...
In DSM-IV it was 2 months ...,
In DSM -III it was 1 year,.....(p195)

 

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drugged

Yesterday morning my husband suddenly developed severe vertigo getting out of bed.  I had to take him to urgent care while I auditioned my latest doctor.  He's not able to do much for himself right now and I don't know how long this is going to last, hopefully not too long.  I had started a daily symptom tracking but I've gotten completely off track so I'm starting over this morning.  Some of the symptoms I'm having now are likely related to the additional stress - my spouse has tended to be more my caretaker as he's always been super healthy and in great shape.  I can take care of most things but it takes me longer, tires me out more, and can increase my pain level.    

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Shep

Drugged, I'm sorry your husband is ill. You may want to keep track either on paper or on computer with your drugs and supplements and your symptoms as a way of keeping yourself organized. Perhaps placing an alarm on your phone so you remember to take everything on time. 

 

It's easy to skip pills when your routine has changed and you go from being the one taken care of to the caretaker. I hope your husband quickly recovers.

 

Please let us know how you're doing over the coming days. 

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drugged

My husband is feeling much better today but is taking one more day off work.  

 

I'm doing okay, just really tired.  Trying to decide if I really want to stick with this doctor or go back to the nurse practitioner I had before.  She, at least, was less arrogant and condescending.  

 

A doctor who's not even willing to read primary research articles because they might contradict the 'standard of care' as defined by his computer program (he showed it to me) is a real turn off for me.  

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Rhiannon

Hi there--

 

You're getting terrific support and advice from the mods here so I'm not going to even attempt to contribute there. (Except to say that this level of expertise and support would cost thousands of dollars if it were being given by actual physicians, as it should be. Grrr. Thank Goddess for the volunteers here.)

 

I just wanted to offer you a long-distance virtual handshake, as someone around your age who has also been polydrugged. And some encouragement and hope,  maybe.

 

If you take this on methodically and follow the advice here, I think you will see your life improve considerably, but it's going to take time, lots of it. It will be well worth the time, however, and time is going to pass regardless, so you might as well be moving slowly in a direction of "better," right? I suspect you and I both know about "just hunker down and survive." It will be better than that. But not quickly.

 

When I first started my journey my goal was "to get down to the lowest possible dose of the fewest possible meds that I can be stable and okay on--and to not get fired from my job."  I think somewhere along the way I have added "and to be able to actually enjoy being alive, sometimes."  I think I am making progress on both of those fronts. It's been 9 years since I started. 

 

Yesterday, even though I'm having some withdrawal symptoms from coming off citalopram at last (after 9 years of intermittent tapering)--I was visiting my granddaughter. She was playing in the yard, I was sitting on the front steps. I leaned back and looked up at the sky. The first scents of fall were in the air, the sky was deep blue, there were bees buzzing in the lavender, my granddaughter was telling herself a story as she stepped across the stepping stones, and in that moment I felt a sweet sense of joy and contentment. I said a little "thank you" and breathed deeply and just let myself feel it.

 

I do not take those moments for granted. Those are my stepping stones as I travel through the days, weeks, months, years.

 

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. Hang in there. 

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drugged
Posted (edited)

So the doctor I saw yesterday agreed (I thought he did anyway) to leave my prescriptions as they are for the time being but when I picked up my refills from the pharmacy he'd only prescribed one 5mg diazepam/day.  That's a third of what I've been taking.  I called his office and pointed out that changing the dose of a benzo that I'd been on for over 15 years by two-thirds would throw me into benzo withdrawal.  This is the second healthcare practitioner in this area to prescribe a massive cut in my benzo script.  The first one cut it in half.  Neither practitioner discussed the cut with me before doing it.  I'm extremely angry and very stressed out at this point.  

 

Yesterday's doctor also referred to me as "one of those women" in reference to the childhood abuse I'd experienced.  

Edited by drugged
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Shep
On 8/28/2019 at 7:12 AM, drugged said:

So the doctor I saw yesterday agreed (I thought he did anyway) to leave my prescriptions as they are for the time being but when I picked up my refills from the pharmacy he'd only prescribed one 5mg diazepam/day.  That's a third of what I've been taking.  I called his office and pointed out that changing the dose of a benzo that I'd been on for over 15 years by two-thirds would throw me into benzo withdrawal.  This is the second healthcare practitioner in this area to prescribe a massive cut in my benzo script.  The first one cut it in half.  Neither practitioner discussed the cut with me before doing it.  I'm extremely angry and very stressed out at this point.  

 

How many 5 mg pills did he prescribe? How many refills do you have with this prescription?

 

Please check out these links and see if there's a recommended doctor near you, even if it requires a bit of a drive. There are some doctors who use Skype. You may also want to include therapists who are listed on the Mad in America site, as they may know of benzo knowledgeable doctors in your area. 

 

Mad in America - Provider Directory

 

Recommended doctors, therapists, and clinics

 

On 8/28/2019 at 7:12 AM, drugged said:

Yesterday's doctor also referred to me as "one of those women" in reference to the childhood abuse I'd experienced.  

 

This is the sad reality of our dysfunctional healthcare system. Please don't take this personally. Let it motivate you to find a better doctor. 

 

Please let us know what you find out after you have a chance to read over the links and make some calls.

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drugged

I finally got the prescription corrected.  I take 15mgs/day, two 5mgs at bedtime and one in the morning.  I was given 30 - 5mg tablets for the month.  No refills allowed for benzos anymore.

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Shep

I'm glad you were able to get your prescription refilled.

 

How are you feeling? 

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Altostrata

drugged, I am sorry you are so uncomfortable.

 

On 8/17/2019 at 3:29 AM, ChessieCat said:

From http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html

Drug Interaction Report

This report displays the potential drug interactions for the following 10 drugs:

  • Lyrica (pregabalin)
  • buspirone
  • venlafaxine
  • diazepam
  • tramadol
  • trazodone
  • zolpidem
  • omeprazole
  • levothyroxine
  • liothyronine
 
Major (8)
Moderate (13)
Minor (3)
Food (8)
Therapeutic Duplication (5)

Interactions between your drugs

Major

busPIRone traMADol

Applies to: buspirone, tramadol

Using narcotic pain or cough medications together with other medications that also cause central nervous system depression can lead to serious side effects including respiratory distress, coma, and even death. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring to safely use both medications. Do not drink alcohol or self-medicate with these medications without your doctor's approval, and do not exceed the doses or frequency and duration of use prescribed by your doctor. Also, you should avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how these medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

busPIRone venlafaxine

Applies to: buspirone, venlafaxine

Using busPIRone together with venlafaxine can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, shivering or shaking, blurred vision, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, incoordination, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Severe cases may result in coma and even death. You should seek immediate medical attention if you experience these symptoms while taking the medications. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may already be aware of the risks, but has determined that this is the best course of treatment for you and has taken appropriate precautions and is monitoring you closely for any potential complications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

busPIRone traZODone

Applies to: buspirone, trazodone

Using busPIRone together with traZODone can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, shivering or shaking, blurred vision, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, incoordination, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Severe cases may result in coma and even death. You should seek immediate medical attention if you experience these symptoms while taking the medications. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may already be aware of the risks, but has determined that this is the best course of treatment for you and has taken appropriate precautions and is monitoring you closely for any potential complications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

zolpidem traMADol

Applies to: zolpidem, tramadol

Using narcotic pain or cough medications together with other medications that also cause central nervous system depression can lead to serious side effects including respiratory distress, coma, and even death. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring to safely use both medications. Do not drink alcohol or self-medicate with these medications without your doctor's approval, and do not exceed the doses or frequency and duration of use prescribed by your doctor. Also, you should avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how these medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

diazePAM traMADol

Applies to: diazepam, tramadol

Using narcotic pain or cough medications together with other medications that also cause central nervous system depression can lead to serious side effects including respiratory distress, coma, and even death. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring to safely use both medications. Do not drink alcohol or self-medicate with these medications without your doctor's approval, and do not exceed the doses or frequency and duration of use prescribed by your doctor. Also, you should avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how these medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

traZODone traMADol

Applies to: trazodone, tramadol

Talk to your doctor before using traMADol together with traZODone. Combining these medications can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, blurred vision, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Severe cases may result in coma and even death. You should contact your doctor immediately if you experience these symptoms while taking the medications. Using traMADol with traZODone may also increase the risk of seizures not related to the serotonin syndrome. The interaction may be more likely if you are elderly, undergoing alcohol or drug withdrawal, have a history of seizures, or have a condition affecting the central nervous system such as a brain tumor or head trauma. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

venlafaxine traMADol

Applies to: venlafaxine, tramadol

Talk to your doctor before using traMADol together with venlafaxine. Combining these medications can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, blurred vision, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Severe cases may result in coma and even death. You should contact your doctor immediately if you experience these symptoms while taking the medications. Using traMADol with venlafaxine may also increase the risk of seizures not related to the serotonin syndrome. The interaction may be more likely if you are elderly, undergoing alcohol or drug withdrawal, have a history of seizures, or have a condition affecting the central nervous system such as a brain tumor or head trauma. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Major

traZODone venlafaxine

Applies to: trazodone, venlafaxine

Using traZODone together with venlafaxine can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, shivering or shaking, blurred vision, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, incoordination, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Severe cases may result in coma and even death. You should seek immediate medical attention if you experience these symptoms while taking the medications. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may already be aware of the risks, but has determined that this is the best course of treatment for you and has taken appropriate precautions and is monitoring you closely for any potential complications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

traZODone pregabalin

Applies to: trazodone, Lyrica (pregabalin)

Using traZODone together with pregabalin may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

diazePAM omeprazole

Applies to: diazepam, omeprazole

Omeprazole may increase the blood levels and effects of diazePAM. This can increase the risk of side effects including excessive drowsiness and breathing difficulties. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

zolpidem venlafaxine

Applies to: zolpidem, venlafaxine

Using zolpidem together with venlafaxine may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

zolpidem pregabalin

Applies to: zolpidem, Lyrica (pregabalin)

Using zolpidem together with pregabalin may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

venlafaxine pregabalin

Applies to: venlafaxine, Lyrica (pregabalin)

Using venlafaxine together with pregabalin may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

traZODone zolpidem

Applies to: trazodone, zolpidem

Using traZODone together with zolpidem may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

diazePAM pregabalin

Applies to: diazepam, Lyrica (pregabalin)

Using diazePAM together with pregabalin may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

traMADol pregabalin

Applies to: tramadol, Lyrica (pregabalin)

Using traMADol together with pregabalin may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

diazePAM traZODone

Applies to: diazepam, trazodone

Using diazePAM together with traZODone may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

busPIRone pregabalin

Applies to: buspirone, Lyrica (pregabalin)

Using busPIRone together with pregabalin may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

busPIRone zolpidem

Applies to: buspirone, zolpidem

Using busPIRone together with zolpidem may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

diazePAM zolpidem

Applies to: diazepam, zolpidem

Using diazePAM together with zolpidem may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

diazePAM venlafaxine

Applies to: diazepam, venlafaxine

Using diazePAM together with venlafaxine may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Minor

traZODone liothyronine

Applies to: trazodone, liothyronine

Consumer information for this minor interaction is not currently available. Some minor drug interactions may not be clinically relevant in all patients. Minor drug interactions do not usually cause harm or require a change in therapy. However, your healthcare provider can determine if adjustments to your medications are needed.
 

Minor

levothyroxine traZODone

Applies to: levothyroxine, trazodone

Consumer information for this minor interaction is not currently available. Some minor drug interactions may not be clinically relevant in all patients. Minor drug interactions do not usually cause harm or require a change in therapy. However, your healthcare provider can determine if adjustments to your medications are needed.
 

Minor

omeprazole traZODone

Applies to: omeprazole, trazodone

Consumer information for this minor interaction is not currently available. Some minor drug interactions may not be clinically relevant in all patients. Minor drug interactions do not usually cause harm or require a change in therapy. However, your healthcare provider can determine if adjustments to your medications are needed.

Drug and food interactions

Moderate

diazePAM food

Applies to: diazepam

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with diazePAM and lead to potentially dangerous side effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Do not drink alcohol while taking diazePAM. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol. You may feel more drowsy, dizzy, or tired if you take diazePAM with alcohol. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

busPIRone food

Applies to: buspirone

You should avoid the use of alcohol while being treated with busPIRone. Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of busPIRone such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. Patients receiving busPIRone should preferably avoid the consumption of large amounts of grapefruits and grapefruit juice. If this is not possible, the busPIRone dose should be taken at least 2 hours before or 8 hours after grapefruit or grapefruit juice. Large amounts of grapefruit and grapefruit juice may cause increased levels of busPIRone in your body. This can lead to increased adverse effects such as drowsiness. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

levothyroxine food

Applies to: levothyroxine

The timing of meals relative to your levothyroxine dose can affect absorption of the medication. Therefore, levothyroxine should be taken on a consistent schedule with regard to time of day and relation to meals to avoid large fluctuations in blood levels, which may alter its effects. In addition, absorption of levothyroxine may be decreased by foods such as soybean flour, cotton seed meal, walnuts, dietary fiber, calcium, and calcium fortified juices. These foods should be avoided within several hours of dosing if possible. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

 

Moderate

traZODone food

Applies to: trazodone

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of traZODone such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with traZODone. Do not use more than the recommended dose of traZODone, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

zolpidem food

Applies to: zolpidem

You should avoid the use of alcohol while being treated with zolpidem. Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of zolpidem such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. Taking zolpidem with food may delay the onset of sleep. For faster sleep onset, zolpidem should not be taken with or immediately after a meal. This will make it easier for your body to absorb the medication. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Moderate

venlafaxine food

Applies to: venlafaxine

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of venlafaxine such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with venlafaxine. Do not use more than the recommended dose of venlafaxine, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

traMADol food

Applies to: tramadol

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of traMADol such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with traMADol. Do not use more than the recommended dose of traMADol, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Moderate

pregabalin food

Applies to: Lyrica (pregabalin)

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of pregabalin such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with pregabalin. Do not use more than the recommended dose of pregabalin, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Switch to professional interaction data

Therapeutic duplication warnings

Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs' category to be taken concurrently is usually three. Your list includes six medicines belonging to the 'Central Nervous System (CNS) Drugs' category:

  • Lyrica (pregabalin)
  • buspirone
  • venlafaxine
  • diazepam
  • trazodone
  • zolpidem

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication

Psychotropic agents

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'psychotropic agents' category to be taken concurrently is usually three. Your list includes five medicines belonging to the 'psychotropic agents' category:

  • buspirone
  • venlafaxine
  • diazepam
  • trazodone
  • zolpidem

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication

Antidepressants

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'antidepressants' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'antidepressants' category:

  • venlafaxine
  • trazodone

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

 

Tranquilizers

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'tranquilizers' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'tranquilizers' category:

  • buspirone
  • diazepam

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication

Thyroid hormones

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'thyroid hormones' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'thyroid hormones' category:

  • levothyroxine
  • liothyronine

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

 

On 8/20/2019 at 4:39 AM, drugged said:

August 19 Monday

2:30 am woke up with severe headache, GI pain and bloating, muscle pain upper body

3:15 am took 100mg tramadol and 5mg diazepam 

4:15 am got up 

        75mg venlafaxine

        20mg omeprazole

        thyroid meds

6:00 am ate light breakfast

~7 or 8 am dry mouth, bad taste in mouth

10:00 am slight headache

11:00 light lunch headache becoming worse

         25mg tramadol

         2.5mg diazepam

12:00 after shower skin feel hypersensitive to lightest touch

          2 x tylenol PM diphenhydramine helps skin sensitivity

~2 pm with main meal

 

      15 mg buspirone

      25 mg Lyrica

 

3:00 pm lie down and read

 

~4 pm 37.5 mg venlafaxine 

 

5:00 muscle pain, moderate headache pain, GI discomfort

7:00 100mg tramadol

8:00 pm 50mg trazodone, 5mg zolpidem

11:30 wake up but get back to sleep

     

 

(NOTE:  CC adding in forgotten drugs from member's follow up post) 

 

 

 

 

Sorry about omitting this 

    

 

 

On 8/21/2019 at 4:30 AM, drugged said:

11:30 pm Monday to 1:30 am Tuesday very restless sleep, alternate too hot and too cold, dull headache

1:30 am woke up and couldn't get back to sleep

         took 5mg diazepam

4:00 am woke up

         100mg tramadol

         75mg venlafaxine

         20mg omeprazole

         thyroid meds

 6:00 am breakfast feeling a bit tense and jittery, dry mouth, dry skin, dry eyes starting

11:00 am light lunch

1:15 feeling semi-human cooking a real meal!

2:00 pm main meal  can still feel a bit of headache around eyes and face 

2:30 pm afternoon meds 

        15 mg buspirone

        25 mg lyrica (pregabalin)

4:30 pm restless, muscle pain in upper back, arms, neck; skin hypersensitive, headache a bit worse

        took 2 tylenol pm (50mg diphenhydramine)

6:00 pm 37.5 venlafaxine

7:00 100mg tramadol

8:00 pm 50mg trazodone

                5mg zolpidem

9:00 pm fall asleep

 

 

On 8/22/2019 at 4:02 AM, drugged said:

August 21 Wednesday

1:30 am woke up but got back to sleep

3:00 am woke up with anxiety, restlessness, rapid pulse - a mild akathisia and abdominal discomfort

        10mg diazepam

5:00 got up took morning meds, anxiety less but not entirely gone, diarrhea (third day for this)

        75mg venlafaxine

        20mg omeprazole

        thyroid meds

6:00 am ate light breakfast neck and base of skull tight and painful

8:30 am nausea, anxiety, dry mouth and eyes

8:40 50mg tramadol - forgot to take it when anxiety woke me up

9:00 am anxiety easing a bit

10:00 am no headache at all, wee bit of anxiety, appetite is back,  feel very tired (drug tired)

11:00 am snack

1:00pm abdominal bloating and pain (IBS)

~2:00 pm main meal 

          25mg Lyrica

          15mg buspirone

3:00 feeling pretty good, weak but good

4:30 pm took 37.5mg venlafaxine 

5:30 stiffness and pain starting in arms, shoulders and upper back, 

7:00 pm 100mg tramadol

8:00 pm 

        50mg trazodone

        5mg zolpidem

 

 

 

 

 

On 8/23/2019 at 4:59 AM, drugged said:

Yeah, I figured I was dependent on the diazepam and the zolpidem. I'm dependent on all the drugs I'm taking.  

So here's what I'm going to do; I'm going to take the 10 mg of diazepam at bedtime and 5 mg in the morning.  Keeping everything else the same.  

Starting today I'm keeping track of times, doses, symptoms, etc., on paper and will post 3 days worth on Monday.

 

What can I do if I'm experiencing especially nasty pain?  I get really severe headaches sometimes and I've been taking either another 50mg tramadol during the day or trying extra-strength acetaminophen (1g)?  The acetaminophen sometimes helps with headache pain but doesn't do much for muscle pain.  Just trying to figure out how to keep the dosages of the tramadol the same everyday.

 

 

 

 

One thing that strikes me is that you are clearly at risk for all kinds of drug-drug interactions as well as adverse reactions to any individual drug, you feel worse after you take batches of drugs, and yet you seem to think you have medical illnesses that need treatment with these drugs.

 

FYI, trazodone releases an active metabolite that can cause muscle tightness and pain. If you take trazodone at night, this metabolite, m-CPP peaks during the day -- and it can interact with other drugs you take then. It can make you feel quite ill.

 

As I understand it, over the last few months you've been taking 10mg diazepam per day, yet you decided to stabilize on 15mg per day -- a dosage escalation. Is that correct?

 

You also seem used to adjusting or remixing your drugs and dosages when you feel it's necessary, is that so?

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drugged
4 hours ago, Altostrata said:

drugged, I am sorry you are so uncomfortable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thing that strikes me is that you are clearly at risk for all kinds of drug-drug interactions as well as adverse reactions to any individual drug, you feel worse after you take batches of drugs, and yet you seem to think you have medical illnesses that need treatment with these drugs.

 

FYI, trazodone releases an active metabolite that can cause muscle tightness and pain. If you take trazodone at night, this metabolite, m-CPP peaks during the day -- and it can interact with other drugs you take then. It can make you feel quite ill.

 

As I understand it, over the last few months you've been taking 10mg diazepam per day, yet you decided to stabilize on 15mg per day -- a dosage escalation. Is that correct?

 

You also seem used to adjusting or remixing your drugs and dosages when you feel it's necessary, is that so?

I was using the tramadol and the diazepam as it was originally prescribed - take as needed not to exceed X mg/day (300mg tramadol and 15mg diazepam).  On the advice I received here to keep all the dosages the same every day to let my CNS stabilize, that was the amount I'd decided to take.  Taking 5mg of diazepam in the morning though made me too groggy so I've gone back to 10mg at night and I seem to have stabilized somewhat from when the NP doubled my venlafaxine dose in June and I had an adverse reaction.  Because of that reaction I started tapering the AD back down but too quickly so I've been holding the AD at 112.5mg per day.  I'm sleeping through the night now and anxiety is bearable.  

 

I do have repetitive motion injuries in my arms and a compressed nerve between C5 - C6 in my upper back.  The IBS, the Sjogren's, and TMJ were all diagnosed at a time when I was not taking any medication at all.  I've had a number of injuries from the time I raised and trained horses including a couple of nasty concussions.  I was also involved in a traffic accident that caused a concussion - all these happened when I was medication free.

 

Right now I only have my little cellphone to get online - laptop died and am waiting for its replacement to arrive that's why I haven't been posting daily.  

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drugged
12 hours ago, Shep said:

I'm glad you were able to get your prescription refilled.

 

How are you feeling? 

Actually, not feeling too bad.  Anxiety is decreased and I'm sleeping through the night.  Just the usual IBS and upper body pain.

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Altostrata

Good to hear. A regular drug schedule will help us isolate adverse drug reactions, if any. Please continue to post at least 24 hours of your drug and symptom notes at a time.

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JackieDecides

I'm sorry to hear you have had so much trouble with your "care" - can't believe how bad some doctors can be.

 

On 8/28/2019 at 4:12 AM, drugged said:

Yesterday's doctor also referred to me as "one of those women" in reference to the childhood abuse I'd experienced.  

 

😠

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ChessieCat
On 9/3/2019 at 11:59 AM, Altostrata said:

Please continue to post at least 24 hours of your drug and symptom notes at a time.

 

Have you been keeping notes?  If yes, please post them.  If not please keep them and post them.

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drugged


"Some people are taking drugs in dangerous combinations or are causing health problems. If you are having a serious adverse effect from a drug, such as liver damage, you may choose to go off sooner rather than later. The risk of withdrawal syndrome may be about equal to or even less than the health risk of taking the drug." 

 

One observation and one question:  1)Observation on z--drug withdrawal; I've gone completely off my zolpidem several times over the years when I was sleeping better.  All I had to do was cut the dose from 10mg to 5mg, hold it a that for a few days or a week then stop taking it completely.  I've been able to stay off the drug for months at a time as long as outside stressors were minimal and I was somewhat active.  I'm not sure why that one seems to be so easy when getting off the AD is so hard. 

 

2) question - given the cocktail of drugs I'm on, my age, and the fact that I'm on disability and have no responsibilities other than to take care of my cat and myself, should I consider either a bit more rapid a taper or perhaps tapering more than one drug at a time?

 

My drug soup is incapacitating me as it is so I think I'd be willing to accept having more withdrawal symptoms for the time being if it means getting more of these poisons cleared out of body sooner.

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Gridley
41 minutes ago, drugged said:

should I consider either a bit more rapid a taper or perhaps tapering more than one drug at a time?

I would not recommend that approach.


 Regarding tapering more than one drug at a time, aside from the standard reason that if there are problems, you won't know which taper is causing the problem, there is another substantial consideration:  it's one thing to say you'd be willing to accept more withdrawal symptoms, it's another when those symptoms hit hard and they turn out to be unendurable and there's no clear way out.  We always counsel that you should not regard updosing/reinstatement as a safety net for a taper gone wrong.

 

The same reasoning holds with increasing the rate of your taper.  If you go too fast and run into bad withdrawal symptoms, you'll have to updose, then wait to stabilize, then re-start your taper, ending up with your taper taking more time than if you'd gone safely and slowly. 

 

Much better to do one at a time and to take it slowly.

Edited by Gridley

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manymoretodays
1 hour ago, drugged said:


"Some people are taking drugs in dangerous combinations or are causing health problems. If you are having a serious adverse effect from a drug, such as liver damage, you may choose to go off sooner rather than later. The risk of withdrawal syndrome may be about equal to or even less than the health risk of taking the drug." 

 

One observation and one question:  1)Observation on z--drug withdrawal; I've gone completely off my zolpidem several times over the years when I was sleeping better.  All I had to do was cut the dose from 10mg to 5mg, hold it a that for a few days or a week then stop taking it completely.  I've been able to stay off the drug for months at a time as long as outside stressors were minimal and I was somewhat active.  I'm not sure why that one seems to be so easy when getting off the AD is so hard. 

 

2) question - given the cocktail of drugs I'm on, my age, and the fact that I'm on disability and have no responsibilities other than to take care of my cat and myself, should I consider either a bit more rapid a taper or perhaps tapering more than one drug at a time?

 

My drug soup is incapacitating me as it is so I think I'd be willing to accept having more withdrawal symptoms for the time being if it means getting more of these poisons cleared out of body sooner.

 

Hi drugged,

I quoted your post from why taper by 10% on back to here, your introduction page.  So now it's in both places, hopefully....B)

And I agree with Gridley's response over there. 

For now, I think, in regards to question 2), that is the most harm free response.

Oh yes, your drug soup can be incapacitating.  We do understand this.  However, a more rapid taper that might result in some serious WD symptoms might make things even more difficult.  So we're trying our best to guide you to information, as well as offer some input/suggestions, so that you might feel empowered enough to make the right decisions, along the way.  And with help.  Of not only us, but your doctors too, if you can find one who is open to helping, with all this.

 

Here's another avenue that you could pursue as well: 

There is a governing body (ASCP - American Society of Consulting Pharmacists), and while they do cost money - they take pride in saving more money (because they often reduce medications - it is their job to do so).

 

https://www.ascp.com/mpage/Care_Pharmacist

You might be able to engage a Pharmacist there, who would then liase with your main prescription writing doctor.  So just offering this link to you today, so you can check it out.  Sometimes the doctors will listen to Pharmacists with a bit more of an open ear, then they do to us/you.  Sometimes, I think maybe it's just a matter of time constraints that they are working under, the doctors, other times I suppose that there might be many factors.......that I won't get into here and now.

 

You are also taking care of a husband......and that may be a mutual thing too, each of you taking care of each other, as well as your cat.  So don't knock what you do do, and can do, as not enough somehow.

And yes, we have had some members who do multiple tapers, by doing a taper of one drug perhaps one month, and then another another month.  Rarely, though......on doing tapers of more than one drug at the same time.  Of course, this is complex stuff.......and takes time and understanding on their parts.

 

And again, not to berate you or make you feel bad.  The notes do help a lot.  Like Alto said, a regular drug schedule, will be helpful.  So, by doing the notes, and posting.......we can see when you take your drugs, and at what times, and possibly be helpful in helping you regulate all that.

 

  Oh, and I can relate to the computer AND smart phone difficulties.  These things happen.  I'm in the midst of selling or giving away a car as well.  And work.  Yes, I consider my volunteer efforts in the peer community, at large, to be work.  Here, there, and everywhere.  So there's that.  I've managed to get to having a pretty full life again, in spite of it all.  I'm even having to prioritize, as to what is most important now, so I don't overbook work and life things.

Just saying that......to lend some hope. 

 

This all takes time and patience, drugged........you're getting there, with a complicated situation, and managing it the best you can now.

Best,

L, P, H, and G,

mmt

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drugged

Thanks mmt, I need a lot of reminders to take it slow.  It has to do with my age in part.  I keep wondering if I'll live long enough to see the benefits of getting off these toxins.  Not that I'm enjoying taking them.

 

I've had a terrible time keeping track of symptoms and times and such so I ordered an appointment schedule calendar so I could have everything in one place.  I'll use the alarm on my phone to remind myself to inventory symptoms regularly.  I'm also getting a physical tomorrow with liver and kidney function tests among other things.  Should have the laptop up and running, too.

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ChessieCat

I've moved your post to your intro topic.  It was about your own situation and it keeps your history in one place.  Please see this post for Gridley's response to it.

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drugged

I have a question about induced apathy and/or tardive dysphoria:  I'm wondering if any members here have experiences with dealing and healing from either of these that they could share?

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ChessieCat

There are many existing topics on SA.  You can use the site search function or use google and add survivingantidepressants.org to the search term.

 

So do a search for:

 

survivingantidepressants.org apathy

 

survivingantidepressants.org tardive dysphoria

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drugged

September 11, 2019

3:00am - got up

100mg tramadol

75mg venlafaxine

20mg Omeprazole

Thyroid meds

Symptoms: stiff painful neck, upper back, arms, hands, very mild anxiety, apathy

2:00pm - ate sandwich

25mg Lyrica

90 beads venlafaxine ( down from 115 beads August 12)

15mg buspirone

Apathy

7:00 pm 

100mg tramadol

10mg diazepam

50mg trazodone

5mg zolpidem

Slept from 8:30 pm until 12:30am restless sleep until 3:00am

 

 

 

 

 

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drugged

September 12, 2019

3:00am get up

Upper body pain, brain fog, dry eyes, apathy

100mg tramadol

75mg venlafaxine

20mg omeprazole

thyroid meds

6:00am breakfast

Pain has decreased, brain fog, inability to concentrate, apathetic

2:00pm main meal

90 beads venlafaxine

15mg buspirone

25mg lyrica

2:45pm

Intestinal cramping, bloating and discomfort

8:00pm

100mg tramadol

10mg diazepam

50mg trazodone

5mg zolpidem

 

12:30am woke up

Sleep was restless and broken the rest of the night.

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Rhiannon
On 9/8/2019 at 10:37 AM, drugged said:

Thanks mmt, I need a lot of reminders to take it slow.  It has to do with my age in part.  I keep wondering if I'll live long enough to see the benefits of getting off these toxins.  Not that I'm enjoying taking them.

 

I've had a terrible time keeping track of symptoms and times and such so I ordered an appointment schedule calendar so I could have everything in one place.  I'll use the alarm on my phone to remind myself to inventory symptoms regularly.  I'm also getting a physical tomorrow with liver and kidney function tests among other things.  Should have the laptop up and running, too.

 

One possible consolation: I found that as I tapered down to lower doses, I got a lot of relief from the problems caused by the drugs themselves, even though I was not off them entirely.  Lower doses really do make a difference.

 

When I first started I told my doctor that my goal was to get down to the lowest possible doses of the fewest possible meds I could be stable on. I think that's still true. I've gotten back so much of myself just by getting down to lower doses. And I lost about 23 years of my life before getting there, so I can relate.

 

If you want to come down on multiple drugs, I think one way to do it safely and simply is to pick one and taper it for a while, then put it on the back burner and hold it while you taper another one for a while.  Mods, please let me know if you have found this not to be the case. It seems to me that with a large drug cocktail for a long period of time, a history like yours and at your age, this may make more sense than trying to get all the way to zero on one drug before bringing down the dosage on any other drugs. I think at our age, getting to lower and less dangerous dosages is probably a higher priority than getting all the way to zero on any one thing.

 

Just be sure to keep your goals modest and take it slow, and take a long hold after your last cut of the first drug before you make a cut of the next drug, so that any WD symptoms will have time to catch up and resolve before you start something else. 

 

Again, mods, if you think this is dangerous, please contradict me. 

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Rhiannon

Also, I think other people have said this, I see from your sig that you are taking variable doses of diazepam, tramadol, and zolpidem. To prepare for the process of reducing your drug burden, I'd recommend picking a dose of those and then consistently taking that same dose at about the same time every day. An exception might be zolpidem because it sounds like you maybe take that prn? If you're taking it most nights (say 4 nights a week) it would be best to take a stable dose rather than have fluctuating plasma levels, but if you're only taking it a few times a month it's probably okay.

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Altostrata

drugged, which drugs are you taking PRN,  how often do you take each one, at what kinds of dosages?

 

Do you often make ad hoc cocktails when you have symptom flare-ups?

 

You're taking such a stunningly terrible combination of drugs, I'm not surprised at the symptoms you report. With your pharmacy background, why have you never called your doctors' attention to your polypharmacy and drug adverse effects?

 

You seem to be fixed on reducing the venlafaxine first, although you are taking what I'd consider a dangerous combination of tramadol, Lyrica, diazepam, trazodone, and zolpidem. If reducing the venlafaxine is what you want to do, what kind of advice are you looking for here? We don't know of any shortcuts out of polypharmacy.

 

See Tips for tapering off Effexor (venlafaxine) This tells you all you need to know. We recommend a taper of 10% per month, but I have a feeling you're going to want to do it your way.

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drugged
12 hours ago, Altostrata said:

drugged, which drugs are you taking PRN,  how often do you take each one, at what kinds of dosages?

 

Do you often make ad hoc cocktails when you have symptom flare-ups?

 

You're taking such a stunningly terrible combination of drugs, I'm not surprised at the symptoms you report. With your pharmacy background, why have you never called your doctors' attention to your polypharmacy and drug adverse effects?

 

You seem to be fixed on reducing the venlafaxine first, although you are taking what I'd consider a dangerous combination of tramadol, Lyrica, diazepam, trazodone, and zolpidem. If reducing the venlafaxine is what you want to do, what kind of advice are you looking for here? We don't know of any shortcuts out of polypharmacy.

 

See Tips for tapering off Effexor (venlafaxine) This tells you all you need to know. We recommend a taper of 10% per month, but I have a feeling you're going to want to do it your way.

I'm not taking anything prn now.  Diazepam is 10 mg and zolpidem is 5mg both at bedtime.  I've been posting daily schedules - today will be day 3, so you can see what I'm taking when.  

 

I was planning to taper the AD back down to 75mg/day then try to figure out whether or not to continue that taper or if I should taper something else.  

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