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Shanti

Fibromyalgia Flare Up and Withdrawals

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Shanti

I've had two doctors in the last few years diagnose me with Fibro but I've rejected it. I guess because of the stigma. I'd rather have a concrete diagnosis to justify all this pain. But, after so many tests and everything I've gone through, I decided to go to Fibromyalgia forum and tell them why I am not certain of my dx. Mainly, that exercise causes me more pain, and I've read that exercise helps Fibro. They were all so incredibly supportive! Anyway, I found out that it does hurt worse when you start out, and told me to walk only 1 block every other day and increase it half a block every couple weeks or so.

 

What I wanted to share here, as there are probably people with Fibromyalgia, is that when I would have what they call a Flare Up, it would also send me into more severe W/D symptoms. I'm wondering if anyone else has noticed this. Makes sense, as it's a problem with the CNS, and I could see how it would cause a relapse in symptoms.

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Jemima

I don't have Fibro, but I did notice that any sort of aches and pains I had before withdrawal became far worse after tapering off Lexapro. It may be that the withdrawal is causing your flare-ups and not vice-versa.

 

Fibromyalgia seems to be a handy diagnosis for an illness that doctors don't understand and for which they have no effective therapy or cure. I think you are right in resisting the diagnosis, because one of these days someone is going to figure out what causes it because someone like you insisted on it and didn't give up.

 

From Wikipedia:

 

The term "fibromyalgia" derives from new Latin, fibro-, meaning "fibrous tissues", Greek myo-, "muscle", and Greek algos-, "pain"; thus the term literally means "muscle and connective tissue pain"

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibromyalgia

 

Brilliant. The patient complains of muscle and joint pain and all the doctor does is translate it into Medicalese. That is not a diagnosis, it's a description. And I see that antidepressants are #1 on the list of treatments.

 

Just like here, you'll probably get a lot more valid information from your Fibro forum than anywhere else.

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Shanti

Yes Jemima, that is exactly how I feel about it. I feel like it's a lazy cop-out to diagnose someone with Fibro without doing many tests. I've insisted on things like MRIs, EEGs, Xrays, EMGs. I still am not going to settle into a dx of Fibro, as what would explain the very real and proven neuropathy detected on the EMG? That is not a symptom of Fibro. It is a symptom of Diabetes, which I don't have. But it can be other things as well. Multiple Sclerosis used to be like Fibro before MRI was invented. It had a stigma like this too.

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Rhiannon

When I used to do massage, I noticed certain differences in the connective tissue of people with fibromyalgia. One night a couple of months after starting my taper, I was doing some stretching, and I noticed that my connective tissue was behaving like the connective tissue of people with fibromyalgia.

 

I've read that people with fibromyalgia have higher levels of glutamate in their bloodstreams, and glutamate is one of the things that almost every psych drug perturbs in some way or another.

 

And I get a lot of fibromyalgia-like symptoms as part of my withdrawal syndrome, which are sometimes better and sometimes worse. I didn't have these before. (In fact, rather than trying to explain withdrawal to people, if I need to explain that I'm not quite up to par that day or that week, I usually say that I have a variant of fibromyalgia and it's acting up. It's close enough to the truth and fits my symptoms.)

 

So I think there's a lot of overlap between fibromyalgia and psych drug withdrawal, both in symptoms, and probably in the physical mechanisms causing the symptoms as well.

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GiaK

I wrote something on fibromyalgia and withdrawal...

 

It seems to me withdrawal causes it...but I won't allow anyone to diagnos me with it either...I certainly could get the diagnosis, but it's a waste basket term in any case and essentially meaningless.

 

here is the article I wrote on Fibro and Withdrawal:

 

http://beyondmeds.com/2011/09/12/fibrobipolar-2/

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Barbarannamated

Thumbs up, BIG TIME, Gia!! I almost got that, too. One trashcan is enough.

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Nikki

Years back I did not believe in Fibromyalgia. I thought, from women I knew who were diagnosed with Fibro were actually depressed. I thought it was depression, not some other issue. Maybe I was closed minded. I really don't know what it is.

 

When I had Epstein-Barr I had migratory aches and pains. They went away as the ebv cleared up. That type of paincame back when I went thru WD. The pain is unusual. It's like the pain from a Flu and it is migratory.

 

I have also noticed that in a taper I am more apt to have pains. Not tapering, no pain.

 

Hugs

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Barbarannamated

I should always clarify... when I say I do not believe in a diagnosis, I believe the distress/pain is very real but is being attributed to a "syndrome" with a constellation of symptoms for which causation has not been established. They are "diagnoses of exclusion" meaning that all possible causes have been ruled out during the differential diagnosis. My concern is that the differential dx is not being done and then once a diagnosis is in place, the cause is no longer looked for and all subsequent symptoms are attributed to the diagnoses of exclusion or "thrown into the trashcan".

There is alot of overlap between pain and mood disorders, fibromyalgia and depression, TMJ and anxiety, etc. All VERY REAL, but with unknown cause. When pain is attributed to mood, it sets up a vicious cycle of blaming the patient for not handling emotions, somaticizing, etc. Additionally, most of these are predominantly in women. This dates back to days when women were diagnosed as "neurotics". Pain in men is taken much more seriously. I don't know statistics, but I suspect the incidence of Diagnoses of Exclusion are at least 2-3x higher in women than men.

 

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diagnosis_of_exclusion#section_2

 

Gia probably said all of this far more eloquently in her writing!

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Shanti

I feel like it's a waste basket diagnosis too. It's very hard to accept. I have a severe pain in one spot on my back. When I lay down, sometimes I get a sharp pain there followed by a rush of tingles going upward fast, then a sudden sharp in-breath through my nose. It's the weirdest thing! My neurological issues are very real and it really irritates me to be diagnosed with fibro when I know it's something else. I've read that the Cervical spine might have something to do with those weird extra breaths. I know it's not from sleep apnea or anything like that, as it's not the result of not getting air. I'm breathing just fine then suddenly a deep in-breath through my nose for now reason.

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Nikki

Gia your article was spot on.

 

I don't know what Fibromyalgia is. Yes the pain is real. No one believed people who had CFS. They were told it was depression. The only known or identifiable cause of CFS is the Epstein-Barr Virus.

 

Like I said I had it (EBV) and the pain from that is identical to the pain from Antidepressant WD. Difficult to explain. It also causes RLS and Bruxism.

 

There is a big difference from aches and pains caused by hard work, stenuous exercise, or sitting/standing for long periods of time. This is different. For me it always felt like the pains from a Flu. A sick kind of pain.

 

If you are on AD's or even more, tapering psych meds and you have pain it's from the drugs and it does clear up eventually.

 

Another lovely aliment from drugs :(

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Barbarannamated

Like I said I had it (EBV) and the pain from that is identical to the pain from Antidepressant WD. Difficult to explain. It also causes RLS and Bruxism.

 

There is a big difference from aches and pains caused by hard work, stenuous exercise, or sitting/standing for long periods of time. This is different. For me it always felt like the pains from a Flu. A sick kind of pain.

 

I wasnt aware of the EBV and bruxism correlation. Thanks, Nikki.

I have a natural tendency to look for correlations and the most obvious among these is the prevalence among women...hormones... I noticed my pain decrease significantly when I put an estrogen patch on after missing a "dose" (2 patches/week). Sure enough, there is research showing correlation but one can probably Google most anything and find research to support a hypothesis. (There are studies showing that schizophrenia is correlated to wearing high heels. Yes, really!)

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ajnjj

Okay I have a question. I have been having extereme muscle weakness. I'm fatigued. My head is foggy. This is going on all week. Now I have a sore throat. My doc mentioned that my EBV may have aggravated fibromyalgia in me. If this is the case how do I cope? The last week has been a nightmare.

 

Is there any supplements???? Is there an answer????? Is my doc just guessing ?

 

I'm telling ya this is the pits. Zero energy. Weird pain and weak muscles. My head feels heavy. Wtf .

 

I'm 6 months + off lexapro. Is this still wd?

 

Any ideas???

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Skyler

Okay I have a question. I have been having extereme muscle weakness. I'm fatigued. My head is foggy. This is going on all week. Now I have a sore throat. My doc mentioned that my EBV may have aggravated fibromyalgia in me. If this is the case how do I cope? The last week has been a nightmare.

 

Is there any supplements???? Is there an answer????? Is my doc just guessing ?

 

I'm telling ya this is the pits. Zero energy. Weird pain and weak muscles. My head feels heavy. Wtf .

 

I'm 6 months + off lexapro. Is this still wd?

 

Any ideas???

 

Did you have a diagnosis of fibromyalgia before the symptoms you describe? Fibro involves the presence of trigger points and chronic muscle pain. It is not a waste basket diagnosis, but is unfortunately used by many docs in this way.~S

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Barbarannamated

Anniej! I noticed you had been MIA and thought maybe that date went really well ;)

 

I'm sorry to hear you're suffering. IME, yes, it can most certainly be withdrawal. I've shifted from high anxiety during taper and about 6 months after to crashing in negative energy zone. Complete and total exhaustion. In bed most of day and still sleeping at night. I just read elsewhere that there are flareups at about 6-9 months post taper, though I don't know what that means (anxiety or fatigue). Have you had a very thorough endocrine workup? The SSRIs wreck the endocrine system similar to neuroleptics albeit less weight gain. Considering the weight loss you experienced, I would first check and address endocrine function, including antibodies for autoimmune dysfunction.

 

I don't know about EBV, but sounds reasonable that that could be reactivated.

 

RE: fibro -

Schuyler "not a wastebasket diagnosis but USED THIS WAY." Well said!

Anniej, please read my explanation of wastebasket diagnosis.

 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/2408-wastebasket-trashcan-diagnosis-terminology-and-meaning/page__pid__24048#entry24048

 

QUESTION to Schuyler or anyone familiar with EBV: why is a separate diagnosis needed/used for "pain associated with EBV"? Just curious as to why it's necessary to tag another diagnosis on if multiple tender points are known to be associated with EBV? Also, if a fibro dx follows EBV, is it noted as a cause that can possibly be "cured" ?

For example, neck pain is known to be a symptom of hypothyroidism. Is fibro a SYMPTOM of EBV?

 

I hope I'm making sense!

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DSN13

I'm so glad to have found this thread. After a 6 month taper, I am now 2 weeks free of Lexapro and I have noticed that my TMJ and random aches and pains in my body are the worst they've ever been. So bad that I had a 90 minute massage today and every area of my body hurt to her touch. I have no other explanation for this than the absence of the lexapro in my system. I'm happy to know that this might actually be the case as I was feeling so confused about where these pains were coming from.

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Skyler

 

QUESTION to Schuyler or anyone familiar with EBV: why is a separate diagnosis needed/used for "pain associated with EBV"? Just curious as to why it's necessary to tag another diagnosis on if multiple tender points are known to be associated with EBV? Also, if a fibro dx follows EBV, is it noted as a cause that can possibly be "cured" ?

For example, neck pain is known to be a symptom of hypothyroidism. Is fibro a SYMPTOM of EBV?

 

I hope I'm making sense!

Fibro is chronic and does not go away. This is one of the reasons that diagnosis should not be given when there is another cause (as often is when used as a watebasket).. if EBV related pain goes away in time, it is not fibro. Same is true for pain associated with withdrawal that later remits.. it is not fibro. People with Epstein Barr can have coexisting fibro, but aches and pains from fibromyalgia are not the same as those caused by Epstein Barr.

 

Hope this helps some, ~S

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GiaK

the medical establishment says most autoimmune and chronic illness never goes away...that's because they don't know anything about real healing.

 

I do not believe that *true* fibro never goes away...it may be tough and for many it may not clear but autoimmune diseases do remit in some cases with lots of attention and also by generally avoiding western medicine which tends to make these sorts of issues worse.

 

we are all different and autoimmune illnesses and chronic illnesses in general are individual mysteries in our bodies...

 

there is a huge spectrum of outcomes...just as there are people.

 

I spend most of my time now in chronic illness and PTSD circles these days...people heal and thrive even after horrendous ills...and some also don't...that is the nature of being human it seems.

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Skyler

the medical establishment says most autoimmune and chronic illness never goes away...that's because they don't know anything about real healing.

 

I do not believe that *true* fibro never goes away...it may be tough and for many it may not clear but autoimmune diseases do remit in some cases with lots of attention and also by generally avoiding western medicine which tends to make these sorts of issues worse.

 

Hi Ghia.. there are some who believe fibro is auto immune. I don't think this is the case.. I'm going to check back with The Fibromyalgia Network to see what their thinking is on this.. For now, my understanding coincides with the quote below. And though the pain from fibro may go away for some including me, the symptoms do wax and wane, I don't know of any.. but there is always hope. The trigger points that set off the disorder do not go away, and remain in muscles for our entire lives.

 

An autoimmune disease is one in which the immune system mistakes its own tissues for non-self tissue and makes an inappropriate attack.

 

These diseases can affect the tissue which bind body tissues and organs together, nerves, muscles, endocrine system (system that directs your body’s hormones and other chemicals), and digestive system.

 

From all I can tell, Fibromyalgia is not a case of the body doing something it should not do. It is a case of the body failing to do something it should do.

My link

 

Barb, you are good at researching. I'm pretty sure I read about research being done on autoimmune and fibro not so long ago. Ya interested in taking a stab with Google?

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Barbarannamated

the medical establishment says most autoimmune and chronic illness never goes away...that's because they don't know anything about real healing.

 

I do not believe that *true* fibro never goes away...it may be tough and for many it may not clear but autoimmune diseases do remit in some cases with lots of attention and also by generally avoiding western medicine which tends to make these sorts of issues worse.

 

What do you mean by *true* fibro, Gia?

 

I've read very little on fibro and only recently. The theories about possible causes seem to be all over the board - infectious disease, endocrine, mineral deficiencies. When I see "psychological/psychiatric" as a cause, I disregard the study. I agree that trauma and stress is held in the body as pain, but have an immediate negative reaction when I see that cited as a cause of very specific pain patterns.

 

I have autoimmune everything. *sigh-woe-is-me* I haven't heard of any cures from western medicine though that's not surprising.

 

I've had the "chronic pain patient" label for 20 years. My doc has been respectful for the most part. There is an attitude that chronic pain patients have low pain tolerance. When I get massages, the therapists are amazed st the amount of pressure I can take. They're afraid they're going to "break me... big men would be crying with similar pressure", etc. That just occurred to me. It doesn't fit with the "chronic pain patient" stereotype.

 

I will read on...

 

B

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GiaK

I was using the language in quotes that another poster used (or I might have been extrapolating...it was implied above that some fibro is real and other is just garbage pail)...I don't think there is *true* fibro...and I think most foundations are generally pretty conservative and keep with medical standards...

 

I know there is real pain, beyond that I make no assumptions about any individual and their prognosis...the healing body is a mystery...

 

for me holding that mystery allows for all possible outcomes.

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Skyler

I was using the language in quotes that another poster used (or I might have been extrapolating...it was implied above that some fibro is real and other is just garbage pail)...I don't think there is *true* fibro...and I think most foundations are generally pretty conservative and keep with medical standards...

 

I know there is real pain, beyond that I make no assumptions about any individual and their prognosis...the healing body is a mystery...

 

for me holding that mystery allows for all possible outcomes.

 

Ghia, please do not use fibro standards loosely, or apply the word mystery to outcomes for same. Thanks ~S

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GiaK

I perceive and understand chronic illness in a different way than you do Schulyer...I see everything from a holistic perspective and modern medicine doesn't...though, I'm not making any assumption about your own opinion on that issue particularly.

 

In any case, I will not ask you to speak of it like I do, and I ask for the same in return. I don't think there is any requirement that we all agree here on everything. I will continue to talk about the way I view illness and healing that works for me...I'm sorry you find it offensive.

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Skyler

I perceive and understand chronic illness in a different way than you do Schulyer...I see everything from a holistic perspective and modern medicine doesn't...though, I'm not making any assumption about your own opinion on that issue particularly.

 

In any case, I will not ask you to speak of it like I do, and I ask for the same in return. I don't think there is any requirement that we all agree here on everything. I will continue to talk about the way I view illness and healing that works for me...I'm sorry you find it offensive.

 

My opinion has no relevance here, and I do not respond from subjective opinion. A diagnosis of fibro going back to 1981 does give me some experience in advocacy, as well as the knowledge the only way to discuss fibro is by being very specific about all aspects. Please point to well supported research articles and I will so the same so we can objectively discuss fibromyalgia, after which we can agree to disagree.

 

On a personal note, neither prayers nor positive thoughts have altered the course, though informed Physical Therapy practice enables me to maximize what I can do while keeping symptoms at a tolerable roar.

 

Unfortunately, the fact main stream medicine is rife with errors from self interest and corruption does not mean holistic medicine has the answers, so there is a need to critically evaluate both approaches.

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GiaK

I wasn't talking about holistic medicine...my perspective and world view is holistic, which is not the same thing as holistic medicine per se...I don't speak for any medicine at all...just my experience and that of many others with all sorts of chronic illness which in general have very unclear and numerous causes and thus generally also are difficult to treat all the same...I've only made general statements here today...so I feel no need to back anything up at all...when it's appropriate, I do that, yes.

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Skyler

I wasn't talking about holistic medicine...my perspective and world view is holistic, which is not the same thing as holistic medicine per se...I don't speak for any medicine at all...just my experience and that of many others with all sorts of chronic illness which in general have very unclear and numerous causes and thus generally also are difficult to treat all the same...I've only made general statements here today...so I feel no need to back anything up at all...when it's appropriate, I do that, yes.

 

I think 32 years of unwanted experience in this area gives me some standing and I can talk about fibro symptoms on a first person basis. Maybe the best way for you to discuss fibro would be to reference your personal journey?

 

I will continue to request facts on which any posts are based. The lack of clinical support for global statements, whether based on a holistic world view, holistic medicine, or the traditional medical model is not constructive. There is too much room for turning fibro into the much maligned waste basket diagnosis otherwise. The door opens for traditional docs to use soft criteria, which I'm sure is the last outcome you want.

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Altostrata

Gia, Schuyler, can we all agree that fibro is hard to diagnose and often misidentified?

 

There's even a lot of controversy about the significance of those trigger points.

 

Also, pharma has seen a big pot o' gold in blurring the definition and diagnosis of fibro to sell drugs like Lyrica, making every doctor this he or she can identify and treat it.

 

Incessant TV advertising makes people believe ordinary aches and pains are fibro and Lyrica is just the thing to ask the doctor for.

 

Pharma has seen the opportunity in hard-to-diagnose conditions with no physical markers and made billions from encouraging doctors to throw anyone with complaints (usually women) into one wastebasket diagnosis or another, like depression or fibromyalgia.

 

In terms of withdrawal syndrome-fibro overlap, my understanding is that one theory of fibro involves hyper-reactivity of pain neurons or an autonomic hypersensitivity syndrome. Since withdrawal syndrome often frequently incurs autonomic hypersensitivity, it can also incur sensations that some might call fibromyalgia-like.

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GiaK

yes, I'm in agreement with all of that...I believe I shared a post from the blog to that effect somewhere above as well.

 

it is ultimately a very controversial diagnosis.

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Skyler

Gia, Schuyler, can we all agree that fibro is hard to diagnose and often misidentified?

 

There's even a lot of controversy about the significance of those trigger points.

 

Also, pharma has seen a big pot o' gold in blurring the definition and diagnosis of fibro to sell drugs like Lyrica, making every doctor this he or she can identify and treat it.

 

There is a great deal of misidentification, which is why we need to reference objective resources like The Fibromyalgia Network. This publication has been in existence since 1988 and is well regarded by people who have fibro. I can still recall my excitement on finding a consumer run resource wayyy back in the fibro dark ages. Read their post about Pfizer meds. The Fibromyalgia Network discusses and recommends many alternative treatments, more than main stream medical options.

 

For a discussion of the new ACR criteria for diagnosis, go here.

 

"What is the difference between tender points and trigger points, and how will it impact your treatment? For starters, 90 percent of the 18 predetermined tender points are actually myofascial trigger points.4 Trigger points are firm nodules that you can often feel in your tight, rope-like muscles. Pressing on a trigger point hurts in the area and also shoots pain to other regions, while pressing on a tender point is believed to only cause discomfort to the local area.

 

The finding that most of your tender points are actually trigger points is good news because it opens up your treatment options. There are specific therapies for relieving the painful knots in the muscles where the trigger points are located, and research shows that relieving the pain of just one trigger point can have a significant on reducing your body-wide pain." For the complete article go here.

 

This is a subject about which I'm passionate and strikes very close to home, so I do not trust my subjective evaluation and welcome outside objective resources. The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is not controversial in competent hands. Schuyler

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Barbarannamated

Very interesting article and comments, Schuyler. One doc listed is from McClean.

 

Did you see some of the drug cocktails?!

 

"Cymbalta appears to have no side effects. In saying that, I am on 6 other meds, am & pm and 1 biological"

 

From a pain patient perspective, this trend toward psych drugs for pain is disturbing.

 

I don't mean to stir the pot! Interesting info. Thanks, Schuyler.

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Skyler

Very interesting article and comments, Schuyler. Did you see some of the drug cocktails?!

 

From a pain patient perspective, this trend toward psych drugs for pain is disturbing.

 

Sheesh, I had not even heard about Savella. Ugh. Yup.. Onto antidepressants folks. Thankfully, my PC doc said I was already on enough stuff and refused to prescribe Cymbalta when I asked him about this (before I understood the score about Big Pharma!).

 

From my subjective experience, Lyrica does help with the neuropathic pain often associated with fibromyalgia. I seem to recall reading an article in The Fibromyalgia Network to the effect as well, but will need to look this up later. I want to get this in before my edit time runs out. :rolleyes: The problem seems to be with recommended doses. If I recall correctly, Alto has read that much lower doses than those recommended by Big Pharma would be effective for chronic pain. The use of antidepressants for pain seems to be completely ineffective. Unfortunately, and in keeping with their past record, whenever one antidepressant is found useless for this purpose, a new AD is put forward.

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InNeedOfHope

This is a purely anecdotal story about Fibromyalgia. I know someone who developed this after standing on a sewing needle that went right into the base of the foot. They were bed bound for 2 years, until a diagnosis of Fibromyalgia was given, before that went from specialist to specialist with doctors suspecting ME etc. Then a doctor noticed this person had 'trigger' points and said that is the give away for Fibro.

 

My friend tried Gapapentin and Pregabalin and lasted a week on each as did not like the way they made her feel.

 

She had no depression, no anxiety.

 

An acquaintance of hers developed it at the same time.

 

It is around 8 years later now, the acquaintance is crippled and uses a cane to walk and can do not much.

My friend would not give up. She said she used to shuffle and crawl downstairs to make a drink. She would iron a shirt and that would be it for the day. She tried to do a bit more each day, often to relapse and spend the next two days in bed. She would not give up. Fast forward to today. She now works 3 days a week. Yes, she has had arthritis and shoulder operations from overgrowth of bone, but again, works on physio and keeps going.

 

The summer is far better than the winter, in fact after a holiday abroad she comes back feeling fantastic, so is there a Vit D connection?

 

I wonder how much her refusal to give up and her acceptance of her limitations has meant that she has got a productive life. She knows when to ease up and accepts that, but I admire he refusal to succumb.

 

There are some schools of thought it is an infection of some kind. (which I suppose fits in with the onset following the needle incident.)

 

I think there are quite a few posts on this on The Perfect Health Blog, don't know if you have heard of it. Some people have tried low pulsing doses of antibiotics.

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Skyler

There are some schools of thought it is an infection of some kind. (which I suppose fits in with the onset following the needle incident.)

 

This is a purely anecdotal story about Fibromyalgia. I know someone who developed this after standing on a sewing needle that went right into the base of the foot. They were bed bound for 2 years, until a diagnosis of Fibromyalgia was given.

Physical stresses, in the form of repeated micro traumas can result in the development of fibro.

 

She tried to do a bit more each day, often to relapse and spend the next two days in bed. She would not give up. Fast forward to today. She now works 3 days a week. Yes, she works on physio and keeps going.

 

I wonder how much her refusal to give up and her acceptance of her limitations has meant that she has got a productive life. She knows when to ease up and accepts that, but I admire he refusal to succumb.

 

She may have given her body time to stabilize and come out of the fibro flare. We sort of do the same when we hold on a taper, give our bodies time to heal. Acceptance of her limitations probably meant she did not repeatedly set herself back, which eventually allowed her to build up enough physical reserve to tolerate working on the schedule she has.

 

I think there are quite a few posts on this on The Perfect Health Blog, don't know if you have heard of it. Some people have tried low pulsing doses of antibiotics.

I use the Fibromyalgia Network as my source of information, as I have confidence in the information they use. In particular, I don't know of any valid use of antibiotics for the treatment of fibro, and the only reference I could find to antibiotics on The Fibro Network was cautionary. I did a Google search and was not able to pull up any information on The Perfect Health Blog. While this source may be reliable, there is a plethora of alternative treatments for fibromyalgia, and many are not equal. You would best be served by double checking with a reliable source that focuses primarily on fibromyalgia.

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InNeedOfHope

I don't really know much about Fibromyalgia just what I have come across while trying to find out if Paleo is the way to eat or we should all be following The China Study. I thought the encouraging thing about my friend was how she went from 2 years in bed, to slowly less and then working. From all the stuff I had read I thought it was all about decline. I find it encouraging she improved, I suppose I hope that if there is any permanent damage from wd that clean living can help mend it. e.g. if the constriction for me has been so bad it has caused heart muscle damage, I hope that I can get some of this back, as in The China Study it showed scans of what diet did to unclock arteries over a period of diet and exercise change and showed physical changes unblocking them.

 

Sorry the blog was Perfect Health Diet Blog. They are not experts in Fibromyalgia but seem focused on how infections and parasites can cause auto immune diseases etc. I have put in the link from that page (its the last article)

 

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/category/disease/fibromyalgia-and-chronic-fatigue/

 

As I say I don't know anything about Fibro, I may have symptoms of it now, but I don't think I actually have it, I think it is wd for me, because I had none of the symptoms before. I just thought it might be interesting to see another theory on it. I will tell my friend about The Fibro Network as I am not sure she has read that.

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Skyler

Sorry the blog was Perfect Health Diet Blog. They are not experts in Fibromyalgia but seem focused on how infections and parasites can cause auto immune diseases etc. I have put in the link from that page (its the last article)

 

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/category/disease/fibromyalgia-and-chronic-fatigue/

 

As I say I don't know anything about Fibro, I may have symptoms of it now, but I don't think I actually have it, I think it is wd for me, because I had none of the symptoms before. I just thought it might be interesting to see another theory on it. I will tell my friend about The Fibro Network as I am not sure she has read that.

 

Hi InNeedOfHope, I'm sorry to hear you have muscle pain that seems to be from withdrawal.. I have read many of your posts and you sure have more than your share. What you are going thru is horrific, and the fact you need to finddifferent docs given the way you feel is a lot, but will be worth the effort. Know we are there for you.

 

An fyi, fibro and chronic fatigue are two different conditions, and the antibiotic treatment they mention is for chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue is caused by infections, while fibro may be triggered by a number of different stressors. The treatments for each are different. Fibro does not have a relentless downhill course, but as you friend experienced, the first two years may well be the worst. She has a lot of courage and sounds like a wise lady.

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