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Shanti

Fibromyalgia Flare Up and Withdrawals

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InNeedOfHope

Thank you, she is. I hope I will get the right doctor in the end.

 

The Fibro post is at the very bottom of the page tucked away. The link to infection is pretty sketchy and I have to say that when you read many of the posts on the site, it seems as if every ill known to man is created by some infection of one kind or another. Still, it has one uplifting story of a woman who writes of her 'cure'..

 

"I, Ladybug, fell ill in 2000 and was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in mid 2005. I had so much pain and confusion, I was barely crawling through the day. Five years on, thanks to Dr Powell's antibacterial, antiviral and detoxification therapy, I am leading a pain-free existence. "

 

This is just one story, and certainly not a documented study, but I seem to be attracted to reading about people who overcome things, whether WD or other things.

 

Out of interest from all your research, do you think Fibromyalgia is a new disease or has always been around and been given different names? I ask, because my mother suffered badly and it seems to me that so many of her symptoms were consistent with Fibro. Some docs said arthritis, some said Rheumatoid Arthritis, there were other diagnoses too, I just wonder if it has always been around in some form or if it is becoming more widespread?

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Skyler

Out of interest from all your research, do you think Fibromyalgia is a new disease or has always been around and been given different names? I ask, because my mother suffered badly and it seems to me that so many of her symptoms were consistent with Fibro. Some docs said arthritis, some said Rheumatoid Arthritis, there were other diagnoses too, I just wonder if it has always been around in some form or if it is becoming more widespread?

 

It's always been around, though it is probably more widespread now given the lack of physical exercise. When people are out of shape we stress our muscles much more easily, so our sedentary life style sets us up. When I was diagnosed it was called fibrositis because inflammation was thought to be involved. Fibromyalgia is not a member of the arthritis family, though it was thought to be for some time and referred to as muscle rheumatism.

 

Uplifting stories.. sounds like the right remedy. ~S

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ajnjj

Schuyler,

 

I was wondering if you have read the book "from fatigued to fantastic"? I have not, however, a friend of mine who is also a pain mnmt nurse practitioner recommended it. She says 70% of her chronic pain, CFS, and Fibro patients respond with great improvement from following the protocol.

 

Just wondering if you have heard of or read it.

 

Thanks

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Skyler

Schuyler,

 

I was wondering if you have read the book "from fatigued to fantastic"? I have not, however, a friend of mine who is also a pain mnmt nurse practitioner recommended it. She says 70% of her chronic pain, CFS, and Fibro patients respond with great improvement from following the protocol.

 

Just wondering if you have heard of or read it.

 

Thanks

 

Thanks, I haven't but am looking at the From Fatigue to Fantastic on Amazon. I use The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Clair Davies, Fibromyalgia and Chronic Myofascial Pain: A Survival Manual, and Travell & Simons' Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual The book your friend talks about seems more for CFS?.. I have not read as much on this area because I don't meet the criteria, and my trigger points started off as myofascial pain that was caused by chronic micro trauma. Thanks for the suggestion. Schuyler

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ajnjj

Yes sir but the 3 rd edition, sorry, I should have said that, focuses much more on fibro. She said its amazing. Good luck!!!

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Cdav

Hi, 

 

I was wondering if someone could give me some advice (or refer me to some post) on how to manage or ease withdrawal symptoms that mimic neuropathy or fibromyalgia. 

 

My WD symptoms come in waves and always seem to be different each time. Sometimes it's akathisia, other times it's brain zaps, then it's depression, etc. This time I'm experiencing a lot of acute and shooting pain through my body along with twitching and burning sensations. This happens mostly on my head, back, arms, hands, fingers (a lot of articular pain and involuntary movements) and legs. I'm also feeling extremely tired and with a lot of brain fog. Small tasks are really hard to do right now, even though last week I was doing better. 

 

This has happened to me before and doctor put me on Lyrica. Sometimes it helps a little bit, sometimes it doesn't help at all and I don't want to increase the dosage. I'm currently on 75 mg. 

 

I'm feeling scared this will become something chronic, like it's real fibromyalgia or neuropathy (I really don't know the difference between them). Doctor knows this is a withdrawal symptom but, like I said he wants me to increase Lyrica from 75 mg to 150 mg. I don't want to do this. 

 

Do you think this is only a wave? I started magnesium last week, could this have triggered this? What can ease these symptoms?

 

I'd appreciate any advice. Thank you 

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Petunia

Hi Cdav, see:

 

Fibromyalgia Flare Up and Withdrawals

and   

Peripheral Neuropathy

 

 

When you have a question or comment about a specific symptom, please search to see if we already have a related topic, we usually do.  Then you can benefit from previously collected information and add to the discussion.  This keeps the site organized with all available knowledge in one thread, easily accessible through searches.

 

The search function on this site doesn't work very well.   The best way to search this site for specific information  is to use Google.  Type in survivingantidepressants.org then the symptom or information you wish to search for.

 

If after searching, you can't find what you're looking for, please start a new topic.

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Cdav

Thank you so much Petu! for the links and the tip about the search engine. I'll try it like that next time. 


 


You can erase this post if you want, I already copied the links. 


 


Thank you. 

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Petunia

similar topics merged

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Chicago77

Not sure if anyone still checks this thread, but I tapered off of Lexapro over a 6 month period after being on 10mg for 12 years. It's now been almost 4 months and I have every symtptom of fibromyalgia. The muscle/joint pain is sometimes so bad that I can't do anything. I've had numerous blood tests and even an MRI. They all came back normal. Could this be from getting off lex? Has anyone else had this? If so, how long does this last? I've never had pain like this in my life. The last thing I want to do is go back on a anti-depressant for fibro if I know this will get better. Please help!

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drugged

I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain syndrome going on 7 years ago.  

 

My understanding is as follows:  for a diagnosis of fibromyalgia a person had to have extreme sensitivity to moderate pressure at 11 of 18 highly specific tender points plus a certain number of the associated symptoms.  In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology dropped the requirement for the tender points.  Other illnesses, such as Lyme, EBV, etc., must be ruled out.  

 

Chronic myofascial pain syndrome is a different beast.  In this, trigger points can be felt in any muscle tissue in the body and they can be palpated.  When pressure is applied to a trigger point the pain is often excruciating.  However, trigger points can be successfully treated and much of the pain resolved.  Doctors use dry needling which is really ridiculously invasive (and expensive) when trigger point massage is just as effective and much less expensive.  

 

Upshot for me; a lot of my chronic myofascial pain was dealt with by trigger point massage though this long stretch of inactivity has brought back some of those nasty knots.  I can use self-massage as described in the books Skyler mentioned to work a lot of these out myself.

 

The fibromyalgia diagnosis?  That, I'm thinking, might have been at least in part withdrawal.  In the back of my mind I wonder if what is called "fibromyalgia" might be an iatrogenic condition.  It's symptoms and those of ADWD have a lot of overlap.  Most people with fibro are women and close to 25% of women in this country on taking antidepressants of one kind or another.

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