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Body temperature dysregulation: fever, chills, shivering, too hot, too cold, flashes, flushes


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Does anyone else have this and can anyone explain why it happens.I am always feeling cold right down to the bone as if my blood is ice cold.

Started Seroxat(Paxil) for panic attacks in 1997 stopped the drug in 2005 tapered over 3 months ( doctors advice)

Suffered severe and protracted withdrawl ever since.

No other medication taken.

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The question of whether WD compounds peri-meno/meno/post-meno has been an ongoing one on this forum.   Since ADs mess with the endocrine (hormonal) system (and every other system in the body

Hi Squirrel,

 

Oh yes, im either freezing cold or boiling hot,

apparently its something to do with the fact that after

ad use we do not control our body temperature very well.

Hope this is an area where there is some improvement and soon

for us both.

Began taking 30mg Seroxat on 15th Jan 1997 for grief issues. Remained at that dosage until Dec 05, did doctor ct, akathesia set in along with being non functional and overly emotional, brain fog. Doctor prescribed prozac, propranelol and diazeapam to counteract side effects, and told me to ct those 3 after 2.5/3 months use, induced wd seizure on 2nd day after ct. Was reinstated on seroxat 20mg in april 06, remained at that dose until Nov 07 and began a very slow taper lasting 56 months, finally DRUG FREE on 11th may 2011.

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There could be several reasons, squirrel. But, for one thing, a lot of people seem to have circulation impairment in w/d. In early w/d, I had chronic cold feet, and, if my hands got cold, say in cold water, they wouldn't warm up again naturally. This has gotten much better for me, but it took me a long time.

 

Are you able to exercise at all, or does the vertigo make that impossible? Can you stretch slowly? Any movement will be good for your circulation, and really improves neuroplasticity. :)

1996-97 - Paxil x 9 months, tapered, suffered 8 months withdrawal but didn't know it was withdrawal, so...

1998-2001 - Zoloft, tapered, again unwittingly went into withdrawal, so...

2002-03 - Paxil x 20 months, developed severe headaches, so...

Sep 03 - May 05 - Paxil taper took 20 months, severe physical, moderate psychological symptoms

Sep 03 - Jun 05 - took Prozac to help with Paxil taper - not recommended

Jul 05 to date - post-taper, severe psychological, moderate physical symptoms, improving very slowly

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My temperature regulation definitely was affected by withdrawal. Usually I was too hot. Even on a mild sunny day, I would feel so hot I would feel like fainting. I had to stay out of the sun completely or it would set off this reaction.

 

Acupuncture helped me a lot through this symptom.

 

I'm now pretty normal, temperature-wise, except sometimes in the middle of the night, when I wake up and can't get back to sleep. This is my alerting system complaining about my being so relaxed -- generating heat and wakefulness.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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I am thinking of trying accupunture what are your thoughts on it?

Started Seroxat(Paxil) for panic attacks in 1997 stopped the drug in 2005 tapered over 3 months ( doctors advice)

Suffered severe and protracted withdrawl ever since.

No other medication taken.

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Probably have to look to the hypothalamus for this - it is the bodies temperature, blood vessel constriction and dilation, sleep control center...and much more. AD's and benzos as well as other psyche drugs target this organ.

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My feet are always cold at night, even during the summer. I wear white, cotton socks to bed almost every nite of the year. Boy... do I look adorable. :rolleyes:

 

Squirrel, Acupuncture works for some people. Personally, it didn't work for me at all. Also, I wasn't fond of the needles.

 

 

Charter Member 2011

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Thanks Summer not a big fan of them myself, but I believe it can be done without needles.

Started Seroxat(Paxil) for panic attacks in 1997 stopped the drug in 2005 tapered over 3 months ( doctors advice)

Suffered severe and protracted withdrawl ever since.

No other medication taken.

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Does anyone else have this and can anyone explain why it happens.I am always feeling cold right down to the bone as if my blood is ice cold.

 

I have had this during WD and to the extreme and in various forms:

 

1) Freezing cold all over and nothing would warm me up, even a heating pad turned on high setting, would not eliminate the coldness. These cold spells would last for many, many hours straight.

2) lower legs like solid blocks of ice despite upper body being warmer

3) certain fingers becoming cold, turning completely white and then numb

4) skin shivers and all over body chills

5) scalp shivers

5) cold toes that would turn purplish/blue

 

 

 

All of the above symptoms would manifest even in hot summer weather. I still experience all the above at 2 years off but the intensity is far, far less and the episodes are short in duration (few minutes to an hour at most) most of the time.

 

 

I also had the heat surges, all over body heat, sweaty (underarms, feet and hands). My body temperature regulating system was crazy for a veryt long time. I dressed in layers (to peel off clothes when hot and then layer back when freezing) used electric blanket, heating pads, hot baths but also had to use ice packs behind my neck (which cools one down quickly when in a heat attack), ate frozen fruit etc.

 

Razzle gave the explanation as to why this occurs.

 

 

Punar

To Face My Trials with "The Grace of a Woman Rather Than the Grief of a Child". (quote section by Veronica A. Shoffstall)

 

Be Not Afraid of Growing Slowly. Be Afraid of Only Standing Still.

(Chinese Proverb)

 

I Create and Build Empowerment Within Each Time I Choose to Face A Fear, Sit with it and Ask Myself, "What Do I Need to Learn?"

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Yes - sort of a drug induced Raynaud's Syndrome - when stress hormones and chemicals are flowing we are designed to move blood from the extremities like hands and feet to prevent blood loss during an attack - this is vasoconstriction. Then it can rebound and we get vasodilation and you get hot also why we flush and blush.

 

Women are more prone to these because of anatomical and hormone differences.

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  • 11 months later...
meistersinger

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12818981/

Chronic treatment with antidepressants decreases intraoperative core hypothermia.

 

AuthorsKudoh A, et al. Show all Journal

Anesth Analg. 2003 Jul;97(1):275-9, table of contents.

Affiliation

Department of Anesthesiology, Hirosaki National Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

We investigated temperature regulation during anesthesia and postoperative shivering in chronically depressed patients given antidepressant drugs. We studied 35 depressed patients and 35 control patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. Tympanic membrane temperatures 60, 75, and 90 min after induction in the depression group were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of the control group. There were no significant differences in mean skin temperature between the depression and the control groups. Eight of 35 patients in the depression group and 2 of 35 patients in the control group developed postanesthetic shivering. The incidence of shivering in the depression group was significantly more frequent than that in the control group (P = 0.04). The tympanic membrane temperature of the patients treated with clomipramine tended to be higher than that of the patients treated with maprotiline. In conclusion, intraoperative core hypothermia in chronically depressed patients was decreased. However, the incidence of shivering in depressed patients was significantly more frequent. IMPLICATIONS: Thermoregulation in chronically depressed patients is often altered. The alteration of body temperature is affected by depression itself and by antidepressants. General anesthesia has an influence on thermoregulatory control. However, temperature regulation during anesthesia in chronically depressed patients remains unclear.

History:

1995--Prozac--Quit CT by GP

1995--Effexor--Quit per my GP

1996--Amitriphene--Quit CT when changed GP

2005--Citalopram and BusPar. Prescribed when I decompensated in my GP's office. GP referred me to behavior health. Psychiatrist prescibed these drugs. Taken off citalopram in 2011 due to FDA warning. Quit Buspar during transition to viibryd.

Viibryd--2011 to present. Had a severe reaction in March 2012. Advised both GP and Psychiatrist I was trying to get off these drugs.

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meistersinger

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/14693598/?i=2&from=/12818981/related

Chronic treatment with antipsychotics enhances intraoperative core hypothermia.

 

AuthorsKudoh A, et al. Show all Journal

Anesth Analg. 2004 Jan;98(1):111-5, table of contents.

Affiliation

Department of Anesthesiology, Hirosaki National Hospital, 1 Tominocho, Aomori, Hirosaki 036-0545, Japan.

Abstract

Antipsychotics can induce hypothermia, but intraoperative temperature regulation in schizophrenic patients taking antipsychotics remains unclear. We investigated intraoperative temperature regulation and postoperative shivering in chronic schizophrenic patients receiving antipsychotics. We studied 30 schizophrenic patients and 30 control patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. Tympanic membrane temperatures (35.7 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, 35.6 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, 35.6 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C, 35.5 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C, 35.4 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, and 35.4 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C) 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 min, respectively, after induction in schizophrenic patients were significantly (P < 0.001) lower than those (36.5 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, 36.4 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, 36.3 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C, 36.2 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, 36.2 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C, and 36.1 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C) in control patients. Mean skin temperatures (31.1 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C [P = 0.008], 31.1 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C [P = 0.007], and 31.1 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C [P = 0.006]) 60, 75, and 90 min, respectively, after induction in schizophrenic patients were significantly lower than those (31.5 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C, 31.5 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C, and 31.5 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C) in control patients. Four of 30 schizophrenic patients and 7 of 30 control patients developed postanesthesia shivering. There were no significant differences within 1 h after tracheal extubation in tympanic membrane temperatures between patients who shivered and those who did not shiver. In conclusion, chronic schizophrenic patients were more hypothermic during anesthesia. The incidence of postanesthesia shivering was not significantly increased. IMPLICATIONS: Antipsychotics inhibit autonomic thermoregulation. This is caused by decreased heat production, increased heat loss, and impaired central action at the hypothalamus. Thus, schizophrenic patients receiving antipsychotics may have impaired intraoperative temperature regulation.

History:

1995--Prozac--Quit CT by GP

1995--Effexor--Quit per my GP

1996--Amitriphene--Quit CT when changed GP

2005--Citalopram and BusPar. Prescribed when I decompensated in my GP's office. GP referred me to behavior health. Psychiatrist prescibed these drugs. Taken off citalopram in 2011 due to FDA warning. Quit Buspar during transition to viibryd.

Viibryd--2011 to present. Had a severe reaction in March 2012. Advised both GP and Psychiatrist I was trying to get off these drugs.

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meistersinger

I don't even know what to think about this article:

 

http://www.salerianbrain.com/brain-temperature-may-influence-mood-a-hypothesis/

 

Brain temperature may influence mood: A hypothesis

by Alen J. Salerian M.D.

Medical Hypotheses (2008) 70, 497-500

 

By Alen J. Salerian, MD, Nansen G. Saleri, PhD, Justin Salerian

 

Summary

Lowering core body and brain temperature has been shown to be beneficial for multiple sclerosis, cardiovascular accidents, traumatic brain injuries and myocardial infarction. Svante Arrhenius’ rate law – governs human thermoregulation and all biochemical reactions including complex chemical processes involved in mood disorders.

 

We reviewed the studies on core body and brain temperature’s influence on mood, mood disorders and their treatment. Our review suggests the majority of therapeutic strategies against mania are hypothermic while thermogenic strategies are used to combat depressive disorders.

 

We hypothesize that therapeutic manipulation of brain temperature may represent a key mechanism in the treatment of mood disorders possibly because of brain temperature’s profound influence on human biology governed by Svante Arrhenius’ rate law. We postulate that brain temperature may rise with mania and fall with depression

 

Introduction

The influence of temperature in the physiopathology of various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders has been of increasing scientific interest in the last decade. Two areas in which brain and body temperature may have a crucial impact are neurodegenerative and mood disorders. Salerian and Saleri have proposed a temperature-dependent biochemical system in humans governed by the Arrhenius rate law. We postulated that due to the exponential relationship between temperature and biochemical reactions, a relatively minor alteration in core body or brain temperature may be of significant therapeutic benefit in combating neurodegenerative disorders and prolonging lifespan (1). We further speculated that this small alteration may be as little as a drop of 1°C in core body temperature.

 

Many failures in temperature control have been observed in psychiatric disorders. It has been reported that patients with schizophrenia exhibit dysregulation of body temperature, including different baseline temperatures, abnormal daily range of temperatures and diurnal variation showing an early peak, an impaired ability to compensate to heat stress and compensating more effectively to cold stress (2).

 

”Wehr, et al (1989) suggested that chronic treatment with antidepressants decreased hypothalamic temperature in Syrian hamsters resulting in a cold defense reaction (thermogenesis) that may contribute to the behavior-activating properties of antidepressant drugs (3). Evidence suggests the antidepressant effect of sleep deprivation can be influenced by psychotropic medications (antidepressants or neuroleptics) and by ambient temperatures (3). Wehr hypothesized that the antidepressant effect of these diverse factors may be because of their common thermoregulatory influence.

In this review, we examine the brain temperature’s influence on mood, mood disorders and their treatments. The premise of our review is stated in the form of a hypothesis, hereafter referred to as the Salerian Mood Hypothesis (SMH), is that: The therapeutic manipulation of brain temperature may represent a key modality in the treatment of mood disorders as brain temperature may rise with mania and fall with depression.

 

Lithium is Hypothermic

1. Studies with rats suggest that lithium increases heat shock proteins that are hypothermic (4).

2. Studies with rats suggest that lithium increases brain cholinergic activity that is

hypothermic (5).

3. Lithium toxicity in mice is associated with severe hypothermia prior to death (6).

 

Neuroleptics are Hypothermic

Experimental studies with cats, mice and rats have shown that various neuroleptics are hypothermic and that clozapine, olanzapine and Risperdal produce a dose-dependent drop of colonic temperature in adult male Wistar rats (7). Similarly, it has been demonstrated that chlorpromazine induces a drop in colonic temperature in monkeys (8).

 

Neuroleptics, with a few exceptions, seem to be hypothermic in humans (9). Haloperidol, olanzapine and risperdal reduce axillary temperature of psychotic patients (9). It has been show that neuroleptic-induced hypothermia is associated with amelioration of psychosis in schizophrenic patients (9). Clozapine decreases core body temperature, improves BPRS and displays a linear but weak relationship between the degree of hypothermia and improvement of psychosis (9).

 

Antidepressants are Hyperthermic

Sibutramine, duloxetine and bupropion increase colonic temperature in female Wistar rats (10). In support of the thermogenic effects of antidepressants, it has been demonstrated that 12 antidepressant drugs including butriptyline, protriptyline and nortriptyline were highly thermogenic in rats (11). It has also been shown that bupropion, a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increases brain and colonic temperature in rats (12). Similarly, studies indicate that many antidepressants currently in clinical use have marked thermogenic properties and could therefore cause reduction in body weight without altering the food intake in mice (11). Soubri, et al, 1989, demonstrated that food restriction decreases responsiveness to antidepressant drugs in rats (13). This study may explain the findings of Duncan, Johnson and Wehr (1995) that fluoxetine and clorgyline reduced hypothalamic and body temperature in hamsters (14). The fluoxetine-induced hypothermia may be caused by the caloric restriction and not its direct neurochemical effect.

 

The studies on the effects of antidepressants on humans have been contradictory; yet there is one study that suggests chronic administration of antidepressants elevates tympanic membrane temperature (15).

 

Single Electroconvulsive Shock is Hypothermic Whereas Chronic Electroconvulsive Shock is Hyperthermic

Investigations of the effect of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) on body temperature have been contradictory. A single ECS has been demonstrated to reduce colonic temperature in mice. However, repeated ECS attenuates the hypothermia produced by single ECS (16).

 

Nicotine-Induced Hypothermia, Antidepressants and Bright Artificial Light

Is there any evidence to suggest that a nicotinic mechanism is involved in the regulation

of core body temperature and mood? Although not all the interactions between nicotine, body temperature and various antidepressants are fully understood, nicotine has been demonstrated to induce hypothermia following intracerebral nicotine administration in cats, monkeys and rats (17). Further, chronic administration of nicotine induces tolerance supporting a receptor mediated process (17). Other studies suggest that nicotine-induced alterations in body temperature are influenced by genetic factors. Differential sensitivity towards dependent nicotine-induced hypothermia is identified as the key factor for different strains of inbred mice (18). A recent study in mice deficient in beta-2 and in AChR subunit reduced hypothermic response to low doses of nicotine suggesting that this subunit partially mediates nicotine-induced hypothermia (18).

 

Fluoxetine, phenelzine sulfate, desipramine and bright artificial light have been shown to produce reduced sensitivity to the hypothermic effects of nicotine (17). Mendelsohn, et al, in 2005, speculated that the capacity of three chemically distant classes of antidepressants and bright artificial light (a treatment for seasonal depression) to produce this result suggests that nicotine’s thermoregulatory influence may be involved in the mechanism of action in these treatments.

 

Clinical Manifestations Associated With Hypothermia and Hyperthermia

Transient and reversible psychosis with auditory and visual hallucinations that appear when core body temperature rises above 39°C and disappear after core body temperature normalizes and has been documented (19).

 

Patients with moderate (34-30°C) hypothermia experience brady cardia and hypotension (following early and brief tachycardia and hypertension) as well as progressive depression of mental functions starting with apathy, psychomotor retardation, and silence (20).

 

Synopsis

Body and brain temperature’s influence on mood can be summarized as follows:

1. Most neuroleptics, lithium and single ECT are hypothermic and they improve mania.

2. Chronic ECT and chronic administration of antidepressants are thermogenic and they improve depression.

 

Successful treatment strategies with biologically opposing influence and opposing thermal properties suggest that temperature change may represent a critical mechanism in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and may promise an avenue for therapeutic exploitation. Therefore, it is logical to induce hypothermia for mania and thermogenesis for depression.

 

Further studies are necessary to confirm SMH. Of importance will be studies to measure core body and brain temperature during and after treatment for various mood disorders. If clinical studies validate SMH, there could be novel approaches in the treatment of mood disorders specifically designed with temperature-altering prowess.

 

References

1) Salerian A, Saleri N. Cooler biologically compatible core body temperatures may prolong longevity and combat neurodegenerative disorders. Medical Hypothesis. 2005; 66:636- 642.

2) Chong T, Castle D. Layer upon layer: thermoregulation in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research. 2003; 69: 149-157.

3) Duncan W, Johnson A, Wehr A. Antidepressant drug-induced hypothalamic cooling in Syrian hamsters .Neuropsychopharmacology. 1995; 12: 1-37 .

4) Ren M, Senatorov V, Chen R, Chuang D. Postinsult treatment with lithium reduces brain damage and facilitates neurological recovery in rat ischemia/reperfusion model. Molecular Neurobiology Section – 2003;

100: 6210-3215.

5) Lerer B. Studies on the role of brain cholinergic systems in the therapeutic mechanisms and adverse effects of ECT and lithium. Biological Psychiatry; 1985: 20-40.

6) El-Kassem M, Singh S. Strain dependent rate of Li+ elimination associated with toxic effects of lethal doses of lithium chloride in mice. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 1983; 19:257-261.

7) Oerther S, Ahlenius S. Atypical antipsychotics and dopamine dl receptor agonism: an in vivo experimental study using core temperature measurements in rats. Pharmacology. 2000; 292:731-736.

8) Chal V, Fann D, Lin T. Hypothermic action of chlorpromazine in monkeys. British Journal of Pharmacology. 1976; 57:1487-1495.

9) Heh, W. Herrera J, DeMet E, et al. Neuroleptic induced hypothermia associated with amelioration of psychosis in schizophrenia. Neuropsychopharmacology. 1988;1: 149-

10) Liu L, Connoly P, Harrison J, Heal D), Stock Mi. Pharmacological characterization of the thermogenic effect of buproprion. European Journal of Pharmacology. 2004; 498: 219- 225.

11) Dulloo AG, Miller DS. Screening of drugs for thermogenic anti-obesity properties:

antidepressants. Ann Nutr Meta. 1987; 31:69-80.

12) Hasegawa H. Meeusen R, Sarre S, Diltoer M Piacentini MF, Mchotte V. Acute

dopamine/norepjnephrjne reuptake inhibition increases brain and core body temperature in rats. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2005; 99:1397-1401.

13) Soubrie P, Martin P, Massol 3, Gaudel J. Attenuation to response to antidepressants in animal studies induced by reduction in food intake. Psychiatry Res 1989: 27:149-59

14) Duncan C, Johnson A, Wehr A. Antidepressant drug induced hypothalamic cooling in Syrian hamsters. Neuropsychopharmacology 1995; 12:17-37

15) Kudoh A, Tkase H, Takazawa T. Chronic treatment with antidepressants decreases intraoperative core hypothermia. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 2003; 97:275-279

16) Gleiter Cl-I, Costello M), Nutt Di. Effect of single and repeated electroconvulsive shock on body temperature in mice. Convulsive Therapy. 1989; 5:152-156.

17) Mendleson iH, Sholar MB, Goletiani N, Mello NK. Effect of low and high nicotine cigarette smoking and HPA axis in men. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2005; 30:1751-1763.

18) Marks MJ, Miner L, Burch JB, Fulker DW, Collins AC. A diallel analysis of nicotineinduced hypothermia. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1984; 6:953-959.

19) Okumara, A et al. Delirious behavior in children. Brain Development. 2005; 27: 1554

20) Blatteis, C,. Physiology and pathophysiology of temperature and regulation. World Scientific Printers. 2001.

History:

1995--Prozac--Quit CT by GP

1995--Effexor--Quit per my GP

1996--Amitriphene--Quit CT when changed GP

2005--Citalopram and BusPar. Prescribed when I decompensated in my GP's office. GP referred me to behavior health. Psychiatrist prescibed these drugs. Taken off citalopram in 2011 due to FDA warning. Quit Buspar during transition to viibryd.

Viibryd--2011 to present. Had a severe reaction in March 2012. Advised both GP and Psychiatrist I was trying to get off these drugs.

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Altostrata

Temperature dysregulation is a common withdrawal symptom. Internal body temperature is regulated by the autonomic nervous system.

 

The first two articles are misidentifying withdrawal symptoms. People having surgery are often discontinued from psychiatric medications.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Alto when I was on Paxil & then Lexapro I was always hot. I felt hot on imipramine, but not as bad as the ssri's.

 

Now on Celexa things changed and I do not have that. As a matter of fact I can get chilled which surprises me.

 

My hormones are in check so I attributed it to the meds.

Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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  • Moderator Emeritus

not sure if my hot flashes are withdrawal related or menopausal related - have been having them off and on for a few years - they intensify for a few months then go way for a few months. The last couple of weeks they seem to be more frequent - it doesn't seem to be related to when i decrease - is it possible it is withdrawal related?

Started in 2000 - On 150mg most of the time, (but up to 225mg at highest dose for 6 months in the beginning)
Reduced off easily first time - but got depressed (not too much anxiety) 6 months later
Back on effexor for another 9 months.
Reduced off again with no immediate w/d - suddenly got depressed and anxious ++ again 3 or 4 months later.
Back on effexor - this time for 3 years
Reduced off over a month - 6 weeks later terrible anxiety - back on.
Rinse and repeat 4 more times - each time the period before the anxiety comes back got shorter and shorter
Jan - July 2012 75mg down to 37.5mg;, 8/3/12 - 35mg. 8/25/12 - 32mg. 9/11- 28mg, 10/2 - 25mg, 10/29 - 22mg, 11/19 - 19.8mg; 12/11 - 17m,
1/1- 15.5mg; 1/22 -14mg, 2/7 14.9mg, 2/18 - 17.8mg - crashed big time: back to 75mg where i sat for 2 years....

4th  March 2015 - 67.5mg;   31st March - 60mg;  24th April - 53mg; 13th May - 48mg; 26th May - 45mg;  9th June - 41mg; 1 July- 37.5mg; 20 July - 34mg; 11 August - 31mg; 1st Sept - 28mg;  1st Dec - 25.8mg;  28th Dec - 23.2mg; 23rd Jan-21.9mg; Feb 7th- 21mg; March 1st - 20.1mg, March 30th - 18mg

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Barbarannamated

Absolutely. It could be either or a combination. SS/NRIs have been used to control menopausal vasomotor symptoms, so very plausible that withdrawing drug causes them or allows them to happen. I had 1 intense hot flash at 6pm every day for a few months. Our hormones fluctuate on a regular schedule throughout the day and nite. The fluctuations seem to be intensified as our bodies attempt to reach homeostasis or a new 'normal'. The early morning cortisol surge is an example.

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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  • 4 weeks later...

(Cross-posted from BB, at which I don't know why I even bother to post anymore.)

 

Recently I'm having episodes, always at night, where I very suddenly become freezing cold as if my very bones were frozen, and shiver violently...my teeth chatter so hard I'm afraid they'll crack...it's so abrupt and intense, don't know what sets it off.

 

Prior to last night, the episode would last about 5 minutes, then gradually ebb, followed by deep muscle aching all over but especially my legs and arms, which writhe uncontrollably. Last night, however, it went on for over an hour. I took my temp when it started and almost bit through the thermometer. It was 97.4 degrees F. When the chattering eased up I took it again and it was 100.1 degrees F.

 

The cold is so deep and intense, it's not like anything I've ever experienced before...it's like it's coming from my cells or something...I literally cannot get warm. Then the aching and writhing limbs went on and on, finally I took 2 ibuprofen and a while after that it all let up and I was able to sleep. A few hours later I woke up absolutely soaked in sweat...my nightgown, sheets, and pillowcase were drenched, even my hair was damp.

 

Has anyone experienced this or know what might be causing it? It's frightening.

 

Sparrow

2009-2011: tapered off Trazodone, Namenda, Lamictal, Dextroamphetamine, Zyprexa; cold-turkeyed Pristiq; reduced Lexapro dose 50%.
On clonazepam since 2004, 0.5 - 1.0 mg daily PRN. Three failed (too rapid) partial tapers, 2010 - 2011.
Dec. 2011 - March 2013: Tapered off 0.5 mg clonazepam (Klonopin)

August 2013: Switched to liquid escitalopram (Lexapro) and began tapering from 10 mg.

January 2014: 4.5 mg escitalopram

March 2014: One year off benzos

May 2014: 3.0 mg escitalopram

June 2014: severe depression, updosed to 4.0 mg

Sept 1, 2014: 2.7 mg

Dec 7, 2014: Can't get below 2.5 mg without unbearable symptoms. Doing an extended hold (I hope)

March 2015: TWO YEARS POST-BENZO

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  • Administrator

Withdrawal syndrome can include temperature dysregulation. Temperature and muscle tension are regulated by the autonomic nervous system.

 

Magnesium might help for the muscle tension. I found acupuncture helpful for temperature dysregulation.

 

It's a good thing ibuprofen helps (it counters cortisol, which also contributes to muscle tension). Can you get sustained-release ibuprofen? Take with a bit of food or fish oil to coat the stomach.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Sparrow I don't know what causes it. I did have that Big Time when I tapered Lexapro.

 

It happened alot after a drop in dose. Was worse in the winter time.

 

Nikki

Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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Barbarannamated

Sparrow,

 

When I was being CTd and switched on SS/NRIs and Seroquel, Zyprexa, and various other drugs in a matter of 2-3 weeks, I had similar night cold sweats with panic. I had no idea it was due to switches and withdrawal. I assumed it was menopause-related. Very scary.

They didn't happen for more than a few weeks at most.

 

I bought a few athletic tops made of the fabric that dries fast and breathes. Bought them at Ross or similar discount store. I had to get rid of them because they trigger horrible memories.

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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Funny you should mention that, Barb. I have a pair of gray drawstring-waisted yoga pant that I've lived in for the past 18 months. They have white splotches on both legs from an unfortunate bleach incident. Hideously unflattering but so light and comfortable, especially now that my weight is on the rise again.

 

Sometimes I fantasize about a fully recovered, post-psych-drugs me conducting a ceremonial burning of these pants in the backyard. I know that if I ever come out of this hellhole, I will never want to lay eyes on my wretched Withdrawal Pants ever again.

 

Sparrow

2009-2011: tapered off Trazodone, Namenda, Lamictal, Dextroamphetamine, Zyprexa; cold-turkeyed Pristiq; reduced Lexapro dose 50%.
On clonazepam since 2004, 0.5 - 1.0 mg daily PRN. Three failed (too rapid) partial tapers, 2010 - 2011.
Dec. 2011 - March 2013: Tapered off 0.5 mg clonazepam (Klonopin)

August 2013: Switched to liquid escitalopram (Lexapro) and began tapering from 10 mg.

January 2014: 4.5 mg escitalopram

March 2014: One year off benzos

May 2014: 3.0 mg escitalopram

June 2014: severe depression, updosed to 4.0 mg

Sept 1, 2014: 2.7 mg

Dec 7, 2014: Can't get below 2.5 mg without unbearable symptoms. Doing an extended hold (I hope)

March 2015: TWO YEARS POST-BENZO

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Barbarannamated

Funny you should mention that, Barb. I have a pair of gray drawstring-waisted yoga pant that I've lived in for the past 18 months. They have white splotches on both legs from an unfortunate bleach incident. Hideously unflattering but so light and comfortable, especially now that my weight is on the rise again.

 

Sometimes I fantasize about a fully recovered, post-psych-drugs me conducting a ceremonial burning of these pants in the backyard. I know that if I ever come out of this hellhole, I will never want to lay eyes on my wretched Withdrawal Pants ever again.

 

A bonfire!

 

How are you doing, Sparrow?

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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Sparrow burn them now to signify a new beginning. Don't wait for a fresh start, create it now.....

 

Say good bye to them. Tell them they were a source of comfort and you know they will understand that it is time for you to move on. Thank them.

 

I have done a number of riddance exercises and now that you have reminded me....I should do another one.

 

Hugs

Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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InNeedOfHope

I have this often and as Nikki says for some reason it is worse in winter and cold weather. I guess it takes more effort to attain homeostasis in times of severe temperature drop. It is a kind of cold that makes you feel you will never be warm again.

 

For me, the only thing to help were warm baths, plenty of covers and hot water bottles and trying to remember it won't always be this way.

 

I note on the leaflet of my medicine it says as a symptom 'low thyroid activity', so I put down feeling the cold to that but I am not sure that is the answer.

 

I personally think I have always had a slugglish thryoid prior to meds as one symptom of this is intolerance to extremes of temperature. I have always felt the cold; I have always been unable to lie still on a beach, can't stand the heat. I don't know if I will ever be able to tolerate medicines again, but down the line, it is my thyroid function I would be most interested in investigating.

 

Alot of these medicines contain fluorides and chlorides etc and all of the halides attack and interfere with thyroid function.

 

The chills etc aren't pleasant and for me, somehow make me feel like 'an addict'. Hope this bit does not last long for you.

Sept 2010 - Citalopram 1 day

Sept 2010 - Zopliclone for ten weeks (paranoia ended a couple of months after coming off this and sleep settled down again until the last couple of months)

Ocober 2010 - Cymbalta 30mg

November 2010 - Cymbalta 60mg

February 2011 - 60mg to 30 mg (lasted 10 days)reinstated 60mg

March 2011 - Took 2 60mg tablets on one evening in error - paralysis of face, back of head, shoulder, stabbing in right kidney, lost 30% of hearing)

March - June 2011 went down quickly 1mg a day until I got stuck at 25mg, went up to 27mg, because couldn't breath.

26th June - 26mg

3rd July - 25mg

17th July - 24mg

24th July - 23mg

7th Aug - began reducing by a bead every couple of days or so went well at first then hit a wall

24th October - now on 18.5mg. Since the kidney infection at start of September, have been in constant pain and anxiety, no let up. Given Ciprofloxacin.

8th Jan 2012 17.8mg (currently reducing 0.2mg a week)

8th Jan 2012 17.6mg last reduction was 6 days ago.

15th Jan 17.4mg

21st Jan 17.2mg

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Ugh. Happened again last night, but this time I was prepared with an electric heating pad.

 

Barb, I'm actually doing better overall, thank you for asking. I think holding my clonazepam dose steady for several weeks has indeed settled things down a bit. Clearly I'm going to have to lose this last 0.1 mg very, very slowly. The past few days I've been reducing by a wee 0.01 mg per day. At this rate it'll take another six months to finish, but I'm totally fine with that.

 

Nikki, I'm gonna have to wait for The Withdrawal Pants Conflagration (sounds like a Big Bang Theory episode) until I get something to replace the damn things.

 

InNeedofHope, I've had Hashimoto's for years and know that hypothyroid-coldness well; these nighttime freezing/aching episodes are different. Oddly, it's the exact same thing as the allergic reaction I have to minocycline. I'm guessing inflammatory cytokines are involved but haven't been motivated enough to research it.

 

Today I was actually able to nap for an hour and a half in the afternoon. Haven't been able to do that in months. Perhaps a sign that things are starting to turn around? Or maybe just due to the heavy rains here. Whatever. Sleep is good and healing and I'll take all I can get.

 

Sparrow

2009-2011: tapered off Trazodone, Namenda, Lamictal, Dextroamphetamine, Zyprexa; cold-turkeyed Pristiq; reduced Lexapro dose 50%.
On clonazepam since 2004, 0.5 - 1.0 mg daily PRN. Three failed (too rapid) partial tapers, 2010 - 2011.
Dec. 2011 - March 2013: Tapered off 0.5 mg clonazepam (Klonopin)

August 2013: Switched to liquid escitalopram (Lexapro) and began tapering from 10 mg.

January 2014: 4.5 mg escitalopram

March 2014: One year off benzos

May 2014: 3.0 mg escitalopram

June 2014: severe depression, updosed to 4.0 mg

Sept 1, 2014: 2.7 mg

Dec 7, 2014: Can't get below 2.5 mg without unbearable symptoms. Doing an extended hold (I hope)

March 2015: TWO YEARS POST-BENZO

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Barbarannamated

LOL at Big Bang Theory :) The boys have helped me thru quite a few rough days!

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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  • 1 month later...
  • Moderator Emeritus

How do we know how much hot flushes are related to w/d and how much are menopause related?

 

Or can't we tell?

Started in 2000 - On 150mg most of the time, (but up to 225mg at highest dose for 6 months in the beginning)
Reduced off easily first time - but got depressed (not too much anxiety) 6 months later
Back on effexor for another 9 months.
Reduced off again with no immediate w/d - suddenly got depressed and anxious ++ again 3 or 4 months later.
Back on effexor - this time for 3 years
Reduced off over a month - 6 weeks later terrible anxiety - back on.
Rinse and repeat 4 more times - each time the period before the anxiety comes back got shorter and shorter
Jan - July 2012 75mg down to 37.5mg;, 8/3/12 - 35mg. 8/25/12 - 32mg. 9/11- 28mg, 10/2 - 25mg, 10/29 - 22mg, 11/19 - 19.8mg; 12/11 - 17m,
1/1- 15.5mg; 1/22 -14mg, 2/7 14.9mg, 2/18 - 17.8mg - crashed big time: back to 75mg where i sat for 2 years....

4th  March 2015 - 67.5mg;   31st March - 60mg;  24th April - 53mg; 13th May - 48mg; 26th May - 45mg;  9th June - 41mg; 1 July- 37.5mg; 20 July - 34mg; 11 August - 31mg; 1st Sept - 28mg;  1st Dec - 25.8mg;  28th Dec - 23.2mg; 23rd Jan-21.9mg; Feb 7th- 21mg; March 1st - 20.1mg, March 30th - 18mg

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  • Administrator

Good question.

 

A lot of people suffer temperature dysregulation or heat sensitivity as withdrawal symptoms.

 

If you're pre- or post-menopausal, it may be hard to differentiate one kind of hot flush from another.

 

I found acupuncture to be helpful for my temperature dysregulation (I'm menopausal).

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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  • Moderator Emeritus

Good question.

 

A lot of people suffer temperature dysregulation or heat sensitivity as withdrawal symptoms.

 

If you're pre- or post-menopausal, it may be hard to differentiate one kind of hot flush from another.

 

I found acupuncture to be helpful for my temperature dysregulation (I'm menopausal).

 

I think I'm starting to have temperature dysregulation.. is there anything that is discreetly different? I could not put my finger on just why I think this is drug related.. but I do. For one, the pattern of sweat seems to be different. And I get lightheaded more in the sun.. there are a bunch of small flags. I had significant hot flashes in the past, got drenched with sweat at night. That does not happen now, but I still tear off bedding to cool down. I've only started to get suspicious withdrawal might be a factor in the last couple of days. I get hot, then look at the room temp, and it does not warrant the level of discomfort.

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 

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i am menopausal - my first hot flush ever was coincidental to one of the times i came off effexor. I was always a lot sweatier on effexor than before and i could never tolerate hot bedding. But i had a lot more hot flashes a few weeks ago - when i was on a lower dose - now that i have gone up again, i am still getting them, just not as many.

Started in 2000 - On 150mg most of the time, (but up to 225mg at highest dose for 6 months in the beginning)
Reduced off easily first time - but got depressed (not too much anxiety) 6 months later
Back on effexor for another 9 months.
Reduced off again with no immediate w/d - suddenly got depressed and anxious ++ again 3 or 4 months later.
Back on effexor - this time for 3 years
Reduced off over a month - 6 weeks later terrible anxiety - back on.
Rinse and repeat 4 more times - each time the period before the anxiety comes back got shorter and shorter
Jan - July 2012 75mg down to 37.5mg;, 8/3/12 - 35mg. 8/25/12 - 32mg. 9/11- 28mg, 10/2 - 25mg, 10/29 - 22mg, 11/19 - 19.8mg; 12/11 - 17m,
1/1- 15.5mg; 1/22 -14mg, 2/7 14.9mg, 2/18 - 17.8mg - crashed big time: back to 75mg where i sat for 2 years....

4th  March 2015 - 67.5mg;   31st March - 60mg;  24th April - 53mg; 13th May - 48mg; 26th May - 45mg;  9th June - 41mg; 1 July- 37.5mg; 20 July - 34mg; 11 August - 31mg; 1st Sept - 28mg;  1st Dec - 25.8mg;  28th Dec - 23.2mg; 23rd Jan-21.9mg; Feb 7th- 21mg; March 1st - 20.1mg, March 30th - 18mg

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  • Administrator

My experience of temperature dysregulation was that being in the sun, any little bit, would make me feel dizzy and faint. If I walked from a cool outdoors into a warm building, I would get hot flushes and dizziness. Eating or drinking anything warm or hot would cause a hot flush.

 

Being in a hot room was almost unbearable.

 

None of this happened at night, unless it was a hot night (which doesn't happen often in San Francisco).

 

It was all very uncomfortable.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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I have wondered this myself... I think the hot flushes I get last a really long time, tend to happen at night, and often don't really involve sweating. They always coincide with cortisol type symptoms of waking early, waking with a pounding heart, etc. The way people with menopause have described them to me, though, they only last a few minutes. I may be perimenopausal... it seems to me lots of us on this site also have hormone issues... it makes sense that it's all connected, and that peri/menopause would be a complicating factor is withdrawal.

'94-'08 On/off ADs. Mostly Zoloft & Wellbutrin, but also Prozac, Celexa, Effexor, etc.
6/08 quit Z & W after tapering, awful anxiety 3 mos. later, reinstated.
11/10 CTed. Severe anxiety 3 mos. later & @ 8 mos. much worse (set off by metronidazole). Anxiety, depression, anhedonia, DP, DR, dizziness, severe insomnia, high serum AM cortisol, flu-like feelings, muscle discomfort.
9/11-9/12 Waves and windows of recovery.
10/12 Awful relapse, DP/DR. Hydrocortisone?
11/12 Improved fairly quickly even though relapse was one of worst waves ever.

1/13 Best I've ever felt.

3/13 A bit of a relapse... then faster and shorter waves and windows.

4/14 Have to watch out for triggers, but feel completely normal about 80% of the time.

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Barbarannamated

I had very regular hot flashes at 6pm daily for a few months at about 6-9 months post Pristiq. I havent had those for several months now. They didnt happen at other times during day.

 

I've read that 6pm is a significant hour with adrenal failure that I have (possible cortisol drop?).

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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Nadia, the pounding heart is a sign of autonomic dumping. Sounds like your temp dysregulation is withdrawal-related.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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That makes sense, Alto. They do seem to be different and longer-lasting than the ones described by menopausal women.

'94-'08 On/off ADs. Mostly Zoloft & Wellbutrin, but also Prozac, Celexa, Effexor, etc.
6/08 quit Z & W after tapering, awful anxiety 3 mos. later, reinstated.
11/10 CTed. Severe anxiety 3 mos. later & @ 8 mos. much worse (set off by metronidazole). Anxiety, depression, anhedonia, DP, DR, dizziness, severe insomnia, high serum AM cortisol, flu-like feelings, muscle discomfort.
9/11-9/12 Waves and windows of recovery.
10/12 Awful relapse, DP/DR. Hydrocortisone?
11/12 Improved fairly quickly even though relapse was one of worst waves ever.

1/13 Best I've ever felt.

3/13 A bit of a relapse... then faster and shorter waves and windows.

4/14 Have to watch out for triggers, but feel completely normal about 80% of the time.

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  • ChessieCat changed the title to Body temperature dysregulation: fever, chills, shivering, too hot, too cold, flashes, flushes

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