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Books I've found helpful for anxiety, depression, and trauma


Idyllwild
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Hello, I am new to this forum and would like to know if anyone can recommend any reading on surviving after anti-depressants which helped them?

 

Thank you,

/Idyllwild

 

Edited by Altostrata
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Low doses of LexaPro, Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil between 1998 - 2007; have not used antidepressants since 2008.

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Hi Idyllwild, welcome to the forum :)

 

I haven't read anything in particular, except just browsing around the forum and asking questions that came up. In addition to this website, I have one as well that has a lot of links. The link is listed in my signature.

 

How are you doing?

Taper from Cymbalta, Paxil, Prozac & Antipsychotics finished June 2012.

Xanax 5% Taper - (8/12 - .5 mg) - (9/12 - .45) - (10/12 - .43) - (11/12 - .41) - (12/12 - .38)

My Paxil Website

My Intro

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I would definitely recommend "Unstuck: Your Guide to the Seven-Stage Journey Out of Depression" by James S. Gordon. You can buy it used on amazon for about 6 bucks.

Have taken psychiatric meds since 2002.

Wellbutrin, Lexapro, Zoloft, Effexor (not sure of the dosages, or how long I took them...); have taken Clonazepam (1mg, as needed) since 2002 as well.

I was prescribed Adderall in late 2009 (after saying I had problems losing weight), stopped taking it cold turkey in Feb. 2011- made me very anxious, obviously.

Currently: Have been on Pristiq 50mg since 2008, I think. Still taking Clonazepam. Began cutting down my Pristiq dosage on July 22, 2011.

 

Also- it is my last year of grad school! I am looking forward to graduating, being med-free, and starting a new stage in my life!

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>>User: 'myself' posted the following:

>>Posted 14 November 2011 - 09:22 AM

 

>>I would definitely recommend "Unstuck: Your Guide to the Seven-Stage Journey Out of Depression" by James S. Gordon.

>>You can buy it used on amazon for about 6 bucks.

 

 

Thank you, 'myself' as well as 'Shanti' for your replies. I will check out the Gordon book when I go to the library. Hopefully, they will have this book since I"m currently experiencing budget stuff and am watching my funds. Also, Shanti, I started to look at your website:

'http://paxilwithdrawals.webs.com/aboutme.htm'

This is a cool website. I will especially go to the links:

 

Links

Surviving Antidepressants - A supportive and helpful forum community.

Beyond Meds - Links to professional papers to give your doctor.

Recommended Doctors - List of doctors that are informed of safe withdrawal methods.

Abchomeopathy

Paxil Facts

The Quantum Doctor

Giving Up Hope?

Suicide Hotline

 

I'm hanging in there. I wish I could say I everything is fine but I cannot say this. However, I am seeing a therapist who has mentioned that I get on anti-depressants. I used to take them from 1998-2008. So, I am somewhat familiar with taking them. I just want to look online and see if there are other ways of dealing with my stresses/problems than taking Anti-depressants. So, I have put it off and put if off but now I want to figure out how to take better care of myself. I'm currently just going through the motions. It's quite depressing. I'm going through many changes in life and live away from family and my support system. Anyways, it's been a real challenge and now that the holidays are coming up and I won't go to visit my family, it will be doubly hard to deal with life's stressors. Thanks for hearing me out. /Idyllwild.

Low doses of LexaPro, Celexa, Zoloft, Paxil between 1998 - 2007; have not used antidepressants since 2008.

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Hi again Idyllwild,

 

Sometimes the hardest step is just making the effort to discover better ways to take care of yourself, and then to make that effort to take care of yourself. So, I would say that you are on the right track- and you should definitely give yourself credit for that.

I definitely understand what it is like to just be 'going through the motions' of life. Perhaps you could ask your therapist to help you brainstorm ideas to put together a support system where you are living now. Also, I would tell them specifically that you are hoping to deal with this difficult time without the aid of anti-depressants. I have the feeling that many therapists consider taking that route to be standard...

 

I hope that you can find the Gordon book at your library, or something similar.

Here is another resource that I have found helpful:

http://www.mind.org.uk/

(a great UK based mental health organization, that has very helpful online pamphlets)

 

Take care!

Have taken psychiatric meds since 2002.

Wellbutrin, Lexapro, Zoloft, Effexor (not sure of the dosages, or how long I took them...); have taken Clonazepam (1mg, as needed) since 2002 as well.

I was prescribed Adderall in late 2009 (after saying I had problems losing weight), stopped taking it cold turkey in Feb. 2011- made me very anxious, obviously.

Currently: Have been on Pristiq 50mg since 2008, I think. Still taking Clonazepam. Began cutting down my Pristiq dosage on July 22, 2011.

 

Also- it is my last year of grad school! I am looking forward to graduating, being med-free, and starting a new stage in my life!

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Idyllwild, for some of us, learning how to take care of ourselves is hard. But rewarding in the long run -- you can manage without drugs.

 

Are you getting some exercise every day? This is really important. It can be just 30 minutes of walking.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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I am currently reading Anatomy of an Illness by Norman Cousins.(Some of you may have come across this already) Whilst there is no relation to AD's it is the inspirational story of how someone recovered from a supposedly incurable condition. It's emphasis is on how the mind can facilitate healing with positive influence and even placebo. It's basis is that if negative stressful emotions cause disease and illness, then the reverse ought to be true for positive thoughts and experiences (which is no mean feat for someone in withdrawal I know), but the important thing is the underlying principle. Anyhow, instead of scaring myself with the usual negative journal articles etc, I thought that if someone wants a boost this might be of value to someone.

Sept 2010 - Citalopram 1 day

Sept 2010 - Zopliclone for ten weeks (paranoia ended a couple of months after coming off this and sleep settled down again until the last couple of months)

Ocober 2010 - Cymbalta 30mg

November 2010 - Cymbalta 60mg

February 2011 - 60mg to 30 mg (lasted 10 days)reinstated 60mg

March 2011 - Took 2 60mg tablets on one evening in error - paralysis of face, back of head, shoulder, stabbing in right kidney, lost 30% of hearing)

March - June 2011 went down quickly 1mg a day until I got stuck at 25mg, went up to 27mg, because couldn't breath.

26th June - 26mg

3rd July - 25mg

17th July - 24mg

24th July - 23mg

7th Aug - began reducing by a bead every couple of days or so went well at first then hit a wall

24th October - now on 18.5mg. Since the kidney infection at start of September, have been in constant pain and anxiety, no let up. Given Ciprofloxacin.

8th Jan 2012 17.8mg (currently reducing 0.2mg a week)

8th Jan 2012 17.6mg last reduction was 6 days ago.

15th Jan 17.4mg

21st Jan 17.2mg

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Those concepts are very valuable, InNeed. Thanks for posting that.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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  • 5 months later...

and on books, how about:

 

The Haunted Self (v d Hart, Nijenhuis and Steele)

mentioned in another post here, absolutely worth the effort

 

Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation (Boon, Steele and v d Hart)

a long-ranging workbook for a therapist and patient team

easier read than the haunted self

 

drb

drb, concerned psychiatrist with w/d experience
the opinions expressed here are personal opinions
should not be taken as medical advice
should not be taken as a replacement for your own knowledgeable, sympathetic, available medical practitioner

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  • 3 weeks later...

Alto suggested I started a topic on Claire Weekes' books. Her books, "Hope and Help for Your Nerves" and "Essential Help for Your Nerves" are available on amazon and on iTunes as an audiobook. Although her books are old (written in 60's?), and sometimes it shows, I've found them very helpful for dealing with the odd and distressing symptoms brought on by w/d. She explains "nervous illness" is caused by three things - sensitisation, bewilderment and fear. In our case, sensitisation has been brought on by w/d. This causes our nerves to overreact, producing anxiety, which causes us to become bewildered and fearful. Fear of these symptoms makes our bodies produce more adrenaline, which keeps those symptoms alive. The solution, she claims, is to face, accept, float and let time pass. Face and accept your symptoms, don't try and push them away. Float past panic by relaxing toward it, don't try and fight it. And be willing to let time pass, don't get impatient. By following her advice, you allow your body to calm down and stop producing adrenaline.

 

Another book I recommend is "Been there, done that? Do this!" by Sam Obitz. His book is only available from his website http://www.tao3.com. He descibes a CBT technique called TEA forms (Thought, Error, Analysis). You write down your negative thoughts, state which kind of error it is (jumping to conclusions, extreme thinking, etc), then you write a more realistic view point. The book is simple and effective.

2003-2011: Paroxetine,Citalopram,Effexor; Aug/Sept 2011: Effexor to Mirtazapine; Oct 2011: C/T Mirtazapine back to Effexor; Nov/Dec 2011: Fast Tapered Effexor - w/d hell; Feb 2012: Reinstated Effexor 37.5mg; June 2012: Dropped to 35.6mg; Jan 2016: Propranolol 2.5mg per day for general anxiety; Feb 2016: Finasteride 0.25mg per week to slow hair loss; 18th May - 8th June 2019: Started Vyvanse 7.5mg and increased by 7.5mg weekly to 30mg (lowest “therapeutic” dose for adults).; 21st June 2019 - 12th July: Cross tapered from venlafaxine brand Rodomel to Efexor (1/4 > 1/2 > 3/4 weekly before ditching Rodomel); 13th July 2019: Cut Vyvanse dose to 15mg; 15th July 2019: Akathisia returned after years of being free; 16th July 2019: Went back up to Vyvanse 30mg

Supplements: Omega-3, Vitamin D, Zinc, Phosphatidylserine 

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Thank you....will check them out on Amazon.com

 

I buy used books there. Great deals.

Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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I have had pretty intense anxiety issues all my life and this was what I was originally put on antidepressants for. One book that has really been of benefit to me is 'The 10 Best Anxiety Management Techniques' by Margaret Wehrenberg. You can see what it looks like and browse reviews for it on Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/Best-Ever-Anxiety-Management-Techniques-Understanding/dp/0393705560/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339354855&sr=8-1You can try one technique or multiple techniques. Everyone is different and different methods may be more effective than others. I also love how it explains exactly what is going on in the different parts of the brain when we are having anxiety. It also interjects some humor which I enjoyed.

 

Another book that has been an invaluable reference for me has been "The Feeling Good Handbook" by David D. Burns, M.D. It takes a cognitive behavioral therapy approach and deals with multiple different issues. The link on Amazon for description/reviews is: http://www.amazon.com/Feeling-Good-Handbook-David-Burns/dp/0452281326/ref=sr_1_sc_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1339355202&sr=1-1-spell I bought mine as a used copy for about $7 total with shipping/handling.

Self-tapered off Effexor after being on for 9 years around 2001

Medication-free until 2006

In 2006 went through divorce and placed on Celexa 20 mg and p.r.n. clonazepam

Stayed on 20 mg until 2011 when began cutting in half and taking 10 mg (Didn't really notice withdrawal symptoms)

Began to plan to come off in spring/summer 2012, continuing 10 mg Jan/Feb.

Tapered to 5 mg March/April (about 1 week mild withdrawal symptoms).

Tapered to sliver of tablet, estimated 2-2.5 mg in (1-2 weeks of withdrawal symptoms progressively diminishing and then stopping)

May 18, 2012: Stopped Celexa.

July 5, 2012: Reinstated Celexa at 5 mg.

July 13, 2012: Increased Celexa to 10 mg.

August 30, 2012: Increased Celexa 15 mg.

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Which techniques from these books did you find most helpful, jfrank?

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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I have not yet read this book, but the description describes me (and stoic family) well. From description of When the Body Says No: Exploring the Stress-Disease Connection

 

"Emotions like anger share with our immune system the role of defending our boundaries. When we repress emotions, we may also suppress our immune defenses. In some people, these defenses may go awry, destroying the body rather than protecting it. Dr. Maté explores the reason why, despite a rapidly accumulating body of evidence about the mind-body unity, most physicians continue to treat physical symptoms rather than persons–– and why we must understand the mind-body link in order to take an active role in our overall health."

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0470923350/ref=redir_mdp_mobile?ref_=sr_1_1&keywords=when%20the%20body%20says%20no&qid=1339677974&sr=8-1

 

I learned to suppress emotions early on. Psych drugs assisted in suppression.

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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I have not yet read this book, but the description describes me (and stoic family) well.

 

From description of "When the Body Says No: Exploring the Stress-Disease Connection"

 

"Emotions like anger share with our immune system the role of defending our boundaries. When we repress emotions, we may also suppress our immune defenses. In some people, these defenses may go awry, destroying the body rather than protecting it. Dr. Maté explores the reason why, despite a rapidly accumulating body of evidence about the mind-body unity, most physicians continue to treat physical symptoms rather than persons–– and why we must understand the mind-body link in order to take an active role in our overall health."

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0470923350/ref=aw_d_detail?pd=1

 

I learned to suppress emotions early on. Psych drugs assisted in suppression.

 

Looks interesting. You may want to change the When the Body Says No link to this.

 

The primary action of psych drugs is to turn down emotions or the volume of voices. Psychotropics are sold as a cure, but they are no more than an emotional muzzle. ~S

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 

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S:

 

I need to remember to re-read this and order those books.....Please nudge me

 

;)

Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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  • 4 weeks later...

Has anyone found these books helpful? I was listening to my Claire Weekes audio book today and it reminded me that I must "Let Time Pass". I've been so impatient with wanting to get stable that I've actually been creating nervous tension that can keep your nerve sensitized. I need to learn to just accept things as they are.

 

I believe mindfulness mediation can help with this, so I've ordered a new book from amazon called "The Mindful Way Through Anxiety", I'll let you know what it's like after I get my hands on it.

2003-2011: Paroxetine,Citalopram,Effexor; Aug/Sept 2011: Effexor to Mirtazapine; Oct 2011: C/T Mirtazapine back to Effexor; Nov/Dec 2011: Fast Tapered Effexor - w/d hell; Feb 2012: Reinstated Effexor 37.5mg; June 2012: Dropped to 35.6mg; Jan 2016: Propranolol 2.5mg per day for general anxiety; Feb 2016: Finasteride 0.25mg per week to slow hair loss; 18th May - 8th June 2019: Started Vyvanse 7.5mg and increased by 7.5mg weekly to 30mg (lowest “therapeutic” dose for adults).; 21st June 2019 - 12th July: Cross tapered from venlafaxine brand Rodomel to Efexor (1/4 > 1/2 > 3/4 weekly before ditching Rodomel); 13th July 2019: Cut Vyvanse dose to 15mg; 15th July 2019: Akathisia returned after years of being free; 16th July 2019: Went back up to Vyvanse 30mg

Supplements: Omega-3, Vitamin D, Zinc, Phosphatidylserine 

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I've just been reading "The Depression Book," by Cheri Huber, which perhaps is in some ways similar to Weekes, especially regarding not pushing it all away. Huber is a Zen teacher and so there's a predictable focus on how denying or pushing thoughts and feelings away gives them power over us; accepting them in a self-compassionate way helps reduce the suffering that surrounds the whole complex. I think it may be a little tricky for people suffering intense SSRI-withdrawal, since she sees it primarily as deep-cognitive and downplays biochemical or neurological sensitivities. Still, I think the two realms are never separate and it may be of value; I'm finding it helpful.

1994-2009 50-100 mg Zoloft (plus tried Effexor, Lexapro, Wellbutrin at times)
5/'09-7/'09 taper off Zoloft
7/'09-12/'09 no zoloft, rough times after ~ 2 mos.
1/'10-6/'10 50 mg zoloft
6/'10-1/'11 slow taper
2/'11-7/'11 off entirely, ok for 2-3 mos., then rough
7/'11-9/'11 50 mg
9/15/'11 - 11/15/'11 taper off
11/15/'11 - 2/'11 clean, doing well but with some PSSD
2/'11 - 6/'11 depression creeps back, fairly significant by May.

6/'14 (long time...!)  life is good, full recovery, at least in terms of SSRI addiction.  Still digging out from the social and professional hole that it all left me in, but despite the loss of far too many years to this business I'm basically doing pretty well.  Still some depression at times, even severe on occasion, but clearly related to past trauma and current circumstances, all things that I am continuing to work through and work on.  I'd say it took at least six months and perhaps a year to fully get back to normal (neuro-psychologically and sexually) after the last dose in 2011.

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I've just been reading "The Depression Book," by Cheri Huber, which perhaps is in some ways similar to Weekes, especially regarding not pushing it all away. Huber is a Zen teacher and so there's a predictable focus on how denying or pushing thoughts and feelings away gives them power over us; accepting them in a self-compassionate way helps reduce the suffering that surrounds the whole complex. I think it may be a little tricky for people suffering intense SSRI-withdrawal, since she sees it primarily as deep-cognitive and downplays biochemical or neurological sensitivities. Still, I think the two realms are never separate and it may be of value; I'm finding it helpful.

What exactly does she see as deep cognitive? I agree that it's all connected. This "biochemical remodeling" has been an excavation of my entire life experiences. :o

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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  • 6 months later...

I came across this and found it quite interesting. Might be worth getting for those having a rough time. I think I'm going to get it just because it looks worth the read.

 

recovery book

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This looks good. I may want to get this

Zoloft: 2002 - sometime 2003 CT
Celexa: 2004 - 2007 20 mg
Effexor XR: 2007 - 2009 300 mg!!!
Effexor XR: 2010 - 2011 tapered down to 18.75 mg, hard time with interdose withdrawal
Prozac: 2011 5 mg till October, then got more depressed tried to updose to 10mg for three days and I became suicidal and very ill
tapered to 2 mg then stopped Feb 20, 2012. Restarting Celexa 10mg March 2017 due to rough patch in my life (anxiety and depression).

Link to my intro page here

Also : was addicted to Klonopin 2004 - 2008, tapered in 2008. Still have on hand for panic, but rarely used.

Suspected mold infection living in moldy room 2012.

Supplements I take: Multi, probiotic, wild Alaskan salmon oil, C, D3, methylB12, niacinamide, whey protein isolate

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  • 3 weeks later...

Starting to work through my trauma's has been a life-saving and life-changing experience to me. Before I started with it, I was quite skeptical about the effectiveness of it, but it almost immediately turned out to be of enormous value to me.

 

Reading about it has been an important part of the process, to be able to understand what was happening, how to better take care of myself, etcetera. I recommend starting to read about trauma to anyone who has psychological / emotional problems and a history of minor or major trauma's. I also recommend that people read and take in info from several different sources, as different sources are bound to touch on different aspects of your problems and no single source can give one all the viewpoints one could benefit from.

 

Maybe needless to say, but I'll do it anyway, amazon.com is a great place to read reviews about books and also to search for books by search-term..

 

Books:

 

Waking the tiger - Peter Levine

 

This book gives people tools in hand to start working through their trauma's with use of their body. It explains in a clear way mechanisms that lead to traumatization and helps you to better understand puzzling symptoms. It is some sort of classic and a book that many people experience as very helpful.

 

 

The body remembers- Babette Rothschild

 

This book doesnt really give tools to people to work through their trauma's because its mainly aimed at therapists, but I found it very helpful in starting to make sense of puzzling experiences and to better understand my trauma's and the way they influenced me. It is written in a very clear and easily accessible way. It also highlights the importance of engaging the body in therapy and explains why 'talk-therapies' all too often only have limited success.

 

Coping with trauma-related Dissocation -Suzette Boon, Kathy Steel, Onno van der Hart

 

This book has been helpful in starting to make sense of dissociative complaints I was having. Dissociative complaints are not the sole territory of people with Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder), but seem to be very common among people with serious childhood-trauma's. People who are for example suffering from complex ptsd and borderline personality disorder are bound to have dissociative problems.

 

From a comment on amazon: Some of the issues dealt with in this book include a sense of involuntariness, becoming emotionally numb, amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, isolation, eating habits, abuse, insomnia, losing track of time, loneliness, self-harm, anger, shame, phobias of inner experience, relaxation exercises, numerous personalities at war with each other and guilt. There are also sections that teach you how to deal with stressful family situations or work situations.

 

 

Not Crazy- You are not mentally ill - charles whitfield

 

This book advocates the viewpoint that most or many people who are diagnosed with mental illness are actually suffering from the effects of trauma, toxic relationships, toxic drug effects, ordinary grieve, and or physical illnesses. The author also describes the Drug Stress Trauma Syndrome, which is a term for the fact that many people who are put on psychiatric drugs start to feel worse and fall into vicious cycle of bad drug effects leading to more mental and emotional symptoms, leading to more drugging, etc.

 

 

Reinventing your life - Jeffrey Young, Janette Klosko

 

This book is very easy to read and I think almost everything will recognize parts of him or herself in the problems that are described. It gives very clear insight in 11 common "lifetraps"--destructive patterns that underlie a variety of emotional problems.

 

From amazon: Using illustrations from case studies, the authors describe each lifetrap, discuss its origins in childhood experience, and provide a questionnaire for self-assesment. They then offer a program for change using techniques ranging from experiential (getting in touch with your inner child) to cognitive (writing a "case" against your lifetrap) and behavioral (identifying specific behaviors to be changed).

 

 

Getting Past Your Past: Take Control of Your Life with Self-Help Techniques from EMDR Therapy - Francine Shapiro

 

I dont have this book myself, but have heard very positive comments about it. From amazon: Real People, real life stories, and real emotional healing of past hurts and traumas! In this book, Dr. Shapiro offers a collection of self-help techniques facilitating emotional healing based on EMDR therapy, used by thousands of clinicians and proven successful. Her true stories depict how stressful, painful or traumatic experiences influence our lives and block our potential – and how they can be changed and even resolved. An eye-opener to the layperson!

Have been on Seroquel XR from 2008. Dosages have fluctuated quite a bit. Rough guess: I've been on 250-300-350-400-450-500 mg from 2009-summer 2012. Started tapering july 2012 with cuts of 50 mg. By then I had been on 450 mg for a while. October 2012: 200 mg. Due to flu-like WD reinstated to 250 mg nov 12th.

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I posted a book recommendation in my introduction thread and Altostrata suggested I post the book here too. I highly recommend The Depression Cure, by Stephen Ilardi. It recently came out in paperback, and is a clinically tested 12 week program that cures depression through 6 lifestyle changes. I have suffered from chronic depression since I was 10 years old, and upon completing this program I was depression-free for the first time in 30 years. That's why I think if it worked for me it's worth a try for anyone. The lifestyle changes advised by the book include Omega 3, engaging activities, exercise, sunlight, social support and healthy sleep. I think I always knew that these lifestyle changes helped with depression, but what this book offers is a step by step encouraging program for actually making these changes. I am now tapering off Celexa and am experiencing withdrawal, but I really believe it is much more manageable than it would be otherwise because the program has given me a much more healthy lifestyle. Even if you don't want to do the program, I really recommend the book--it contains so much useful information and I think even following a few of the steps would help anyone tapering off antidepressants. Good luck everyone! Sunita

I started taking Celexa in 2007 for anxiety, depression and PTSD. I started at 10mg and eventually increased to 40mg. I am currently tapering off Celexa. 1/22, 40 to 30mg. 1/29, 30 to 20mg. 2/5, 20 to 10mg. 2/19 to 5mg. 2/26 stopped taking.

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Thank you AGAIN, hippopotamus!

 

I'm just beginning Peter Levine's Waking the Tiger and the Introduction addressed a point that I've struggled with: what IS trauma?

 

In the past, ive thought of trauma in only the most obvious form of sexual or physical ABUSE, neither of which i suffered. It's been difficult to wrap my head around the concept that i have been traumatized, but i now realize i have, on a few occasions throughout my life. This has created dissonance for me because I've FELT the physical and emotional sequelae, but refused to see the underlying traumas.

 

This statement was validating:

 

"The most common of these forms (of trauma) are automobile and other accidents, serious illness, surgery and other invasive medical and dental procedures, assault, and experiencing or witnessing violence, war, or a myriad of natural disasters."

 

I have NOT experienced assault and war, but each of the others were events i never thought of as unusual.

 

It helps to read this. I wonder how many other people have also dismissed life events as the root of later distress?

 

Apologies if I'm posting in the wrong thread.

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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Has anyone ever thought of making a book in which the most important info from sources like this forum about withdrawal is bundled?

 

I think that it could be an excellent help for people who want to withdraw. Any thoughts on this?

Have been on Seroquel XR from 2008. Dosages have fluctuated quite a bit. Rough guess: I've been on 250-300-350-400-450-500 mg from 2009-summer 2012. Started tapering july 2012 with cuts of 50 mg. By then I had been on 450 mg for a while. October 2012: 200 mg. Due to flu-like WD reinstated to 250 mg nov 12th.

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  • 6 months later...

I am in the proces of reading one of Louse Hay's books.  Her message is that once she changed her thinking, she discovered a new found freedom and good things came into her life.

 

Everyday a Friday by Joel Osteen is very good.  For me I need to infuse these types of readings because I have had those imprinted and ingrained negative belief problems.

Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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  • 4 months later...

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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  • 2 months later...

I think it was the Better Living book that has the story about medical people who took these drugs one day... the effects especially those that hit later on that they did not tell anyone about till one person broke open the silence ...was a very telling... as none expected the effects they were feeling to be related to the drug as this is not what they expected of the drug based on the literature.  

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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  • 4 months later...

Just heard about this author: Al Galves. I think he is a psychologist. He has a website and has written a few books. One is Harness Your Dark Side... and one, with Ian White, is called Beat Depression the Drug Free Way. Since I haven't read them (just got samples for my Kindle) I can't comment on them but the topics sound like he may be a hope for all of us. I have been on and off this site for a couple of years; just found this topic and am very glad to have found it. Best to all of us.

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  • 3 months later...

Heres a book i have been slowly reading lately ..

 

Peter C Gotzsche 'Deadly medicines and organised crime How big pharma has corrupted healthcare' (New York :Radcliff publishing, 2013)

 

Gotzsche is  a world leader in critquing clinic studies.

 

22 chapters with 2 chapters on psychiatric drugs.

He doesn't hold back he has a lot of damning words to say about pharma. His telling of the commercialization of prozac reveals a truly sickening story.

Thought for the day: Lets stand up, and let’s speak out , together. G Olsen

We have until the 14th. Feb 2018. 

URGENT REQUEST Please consider submitting  for the petition on Prescribed Drug Dependence and Withdrawal currently awaiting its third consideration at the Scottish Parliament. You don't even have to be from Scotland. By clicking on the link below you can read some of the previous submissions but be warned many of them are quite harrowing.

http://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01651   

Please tell them about your problems taking and withdrawing from antidepressants and/or benzos.

Send by email to petitions@parliament.scot and quote PE01651 in the subject heading. Keep to a maximum of 3 sides of A4 and you can't name for legal reasons any doctor you have consulted. Tell them if you wish to remain anonymous. We need the numbers to help convince the committee members we are not isolated cases. You have until mid February. Thank you

Recovering paxil addict

None of the published articles shed light on what ssri's ... actually do or what their hazards might be. Healy 2013. 

This is so true, with anything you get on these drugs, dependance, tapering, withdrawal symptoms, side effects, just silent. And if there is something mentioned then their is a serious disconnect between what is said and reality! 

  "Every time I read of a multi-person shooting, I always presume that person had just started a SSRI or had just stopped."  Dr Mosher. Me too! 

Over two decades later, the number of antidepressant prescriptions a year is slightly more than the number of people in the Western world. Most (nine out of 10) prescriptions are for patients who faced difficulties on stopping, equating to about a tenth of the population. These patients are often advised to continue treatment because their difficulties indicate they need ongoing treatment, just as a person with diabetes needs insulin. Healy 2015

I believe the ssri era will soon stand as one of the most shameful in the history of medicine. Healy 2015

Let people help people ... in a natural, kind, non-addictive (and non-big pharma) way. J Broadley 2017

 

 

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  • Moderator Emeritus

"Complete Self Help For Your Nerves" by Dr. Claire Weekes - effective techniques for dealing with anxiety, panic and the "sensitised" nervous system.

 

"Healing Without Freud or Prozac" by David Servan-Schreiber - outlines a number of non-med approaches to depression and anxiety, which have scientific research to back them up (for example exercise, fish oil, light therapy).  Not a comprehensive list, but shows that there actually are viable alternatives to meds.

2001–2002 paroxetine

2003  citalopram

2004-2008  paroxetine (various failed tapers) 
2008  paroxetine slow taper down to

2016  Aug off paroxetine
2016  citalopram May 20mg  Oct 15mg … slow taper down
2018  citalopram 13 Feb 4.6mg 15 Mar 4.4mg 29 Apr 4.2mg 6 Jul 4.1mg 17 Aug 4.0mg  18 Nov 3.8mg
2019  15 Mar 3.6mg  21 May 3.4mg  26 Dec 3.2mg 

2020  19 Feb 3.0mg 19 Jul 2.9mg 16 Sep 2.8mg 25 Oct 2.7mg 23 Oct 2.6mg 24 Dec 2.5mg

2021   29 Aug 2.4mg   15 Nov 2.3mg

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  • Moderator Emeritus

The body remembers a 8 keys to trauma recovery by Babette Rothschild and
Healing Developmental Trauma by Lawrence Heller

For those who have trauma histories, particularly childhood trauma. Both authors are strong on the significance of the body and nervous system in trauma. Given I think withdrawal can itself create trauma responses and that many of us have trauma histories in our past I think these are useful

Dalsaan

Please note - I am not a medical practitioner and I do not give medical advice. I offer an opinion based on my own experiences, reading and discussion with others.On Effexor for 2 months at the start of 2005. Had extreme insomnia as an adverse reaction. Changed to mirtazapine. Have been trying to get off since mid 2008 with numerous failures including CTs and slow (but not slow enough tapers)Have slow tapered at 10 per cent or less for years. I have liquid mirtazapine made at a compounding chemist.

Was on 1.6 ml as at 19 March 2014.

Dropped to 1.5 ml 7 June 2014. Dropped to 1.4 in about September.

Dropped to 1.3 on 20 December 2014. Dropped to 1.2 in mid Jan 2015.

Dropped to 1 ml in late Feb 2015. I think my old medication had run out of puff so I tried 1ml when I got the new stuff and it seems to be going ok. Sleep has been good over the last week (as of 13/3/15).

Dropped to 1/2 ml 14/11/15 Fatigue still there as are memory and cognition problems. Sleep is patchy but liveable compared to what it has been in the past.

 

DRUG FREE - as at 1st May 2017

 

>My intro post is here - http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/2250-dalsaan

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I haven't read this one but the blurbs I have read about it sound good:

 

Not Crazy: You May Not Be Mentally Ill  by Dr. Charles Whitfield

I am not a medical professional and nothing I say is a medical opinion or meant to be medical advice, please seek a competent and trusted medical professional to consult for all medical decisions.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just finished this week reading Alison Bass's book::

 

Bass, Alison. Side Effects: A Prosecutor, a Whistleblower, and a Bestselling Antidepressant on Trial. Algonquin Books, 2008

btdt above has already mentioned it.

I recommend it, i read it while riding the bike at the gym.

 

It is an easy read and tells the revealing human story of how 2 courageous woman  didn't give up on taking legal action in 2004 against GSK for fraud ..not revealing the negative adverse effects of paxil.

I felt disappointed though to discover GSK settled by only paying about 2.6 million ...they should have been hit with billions!

I bet they laughed all the way to their petty cash register!

Rose Firestein New Yorks led lawyer on the case said its not about money ...Rose Rose Rose !

Thought for the day: Lets stand up, and let’s speak out , together. G Olsen

We have until the 14th. Feb 2018. 

URGENT REQUEST Please consider submitting  for the petition on Prescribed Drug Dependence and Withdrawal currently awaiting its third consideration at the Scottish Parliament. You don't even have to be from Scotland. By clicking on the link below you can read some of the previous submissions but be warned many of them are quite harrowing.

http://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01651   

Please tell them about your problems taking and withdrawing from antidepressants and/or benzos.

Send by email to petitions@parliament.scot and quote PE01651 in the subject heading. Keep to a maximum of 3 sides of A4 and you can't name for legal reasons any doctor you have consulted. Tell them if you wish to remain anonymous. We need the numbers to help convince the committee members we are not isolated cases. You have until mid February. Thank you

Recovering paxil addict

None of the published articles shed light on what ssri's ... actually do or what their hazards might be. Healy 2013. 

This is so true, with anything you get on these drugs, dependance, tapering, withdrawal symptoms, side effects, just silent. And if there is something mentioned then their is a serious disconnect between what is said and reality! 

  "Every time I read of a multi-person shooting, I always presume that person had just started a SSRI or had just stopped."  Dr Mosher. Me too! 

Over two decades later, the number of antidepressant prescriptions a year is slightly more than the number of people in the Western world. Most (nine out of 10) prescriptions are for patients who faced difficulties on stopping, equating to about a tenth of the population. These patients are often advised to continue treatment because their difficulties indicate they need ongoing treatment, just as a person with diabetes needs insulin. Healy 2015

I believe the ssri era will soon stand as one of the most shameful in the history of medicine. Healy 2015

Let people help people ... in a natural, kind, non-addictive (and non-big pharma) way. J Broadley 2017

 

 

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