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Netherlands: Prescribe drugs only for severely depressed


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For the first time, a government has specified that antidepressants be prescribed only for those who are severely depressed. http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2012/06/pills_should_be_limited_to_the.php

 

Pills should be limited to the severely depressed, doctors are told

 

Thursday 07 June 2012

 

Family doctors have been told to only prescribe anti-depressants to people who are seriously depressed and can no longer function properly, the NRC reports on Thursday.

 

The new guidelines were drawn up by the family doctors' professional association Nederlands Huisartsen Genootschap and suggest patients with more moderate complaints should be told that depression usually rights itself.

 

In addition, people with lighter forms of the illness should be advised to regulate their sleeping patterns, continue working and take up sport, such as jogging. They could also be referred to internet-based therapies and problem-solving courses, the association says.

 

According to the NRC, one million of the Dutch population of almost 17 million take anti-depressants. Most of them suffer from lighter forms of the illness and research shows pills do not help, the paper says. Some 80% of prescriptions are handed out by family doctors rather than psychiatrists.

 

The new guidelines differentiate for the first time between classic depression and depression complaints, including tiredness, loss of concentration and black moods.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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In light of the fact that health care costs are greatly increasing thanks to the great increase in psych med prescriptions, you would think the US government would do the same thing. But silly me, I forgot about those "wonderful" drug companies and their influence on health policy.

 

CS

Drug cocktail 1995 - 2010
Started taper of Adderall, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron, and Doxepin in 2006
Finished taper on June 10, 2010

Temazepam on a PRN basis approximately twice a month - 2014 to 2016

Beginning in 2017 - Consumption increased to about two times per week

April 2017 - Increased to taking it full time for insomnia

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In light of the fact that health care costs are greatly increasing thanks to the great increase in psych med prescriptions, you would think the US government would do the same thing. But silly me, I forgot about those "wonderful" drug companies and their influence on health policy.

 

CS

 

According to Robert Whitaker, more than health care costs are involved. I forget the percentage he mentioned in Anatomy of An Epidemic, but a very large proportion of Social Security Disability Income and Supplemental Security Income recipients are individuals who are "psychiatrically disabled", no doubt from being dosed up with anything and everything their shrinks chose to try.

 

I've become so cynical about our government that my only remaining curiosity is whether Big Pharma or Big Agra owns the bigger share of it. I'm glad I won't be alive when the long term results of cloned and genetically modified food starts showing up in the population. :(

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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In light of the fact that health care costs are greatly increasing thanks to the great increase in psych med prescriptions, you would think the US government would do the same thing. But silly me, I forgot about those "wonderful" drug companies and their influence on health policy.

 

CS

 

According to Robert Whitaker, more than health care costs are involved. I forget the percentage he mentioned in Anatomy of An Epidemic, but a very large proportion of Social Security Disability Income and Supplemental Security Income recipients are individuals who are "psychiatrically disabled", no doubt from being dosed up with anything and everything their shrinks chose to try.

 

I've become so cynical about our government that my only remaining curiosity is whether Big Pharma or Big Agra owns the bigger share of it. I'm glad I won't be alive when the long term results of cloned and genetically modified food starts showing up in the population. :(

 

Great point Jemima.

 

Yup, the SSI issue is huge. I love the way drug oriented psychiatrists are saying in response that causation doesn't equal correlation. But you had better believe that if the SSDI psychiatric disability rates were going down, they would be writing about it as much as they could.

 

I vote for Big Pharma as owning the bigger share of the US Government although the race is close. And it doesn't matter which party is in power.

 

CS

Drug cocktail 1995 - 2010
Started taper of Adderall, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron, and Doxepin in 2006
Finished taper on June 10, 2010

Temazepam on a PRN basis approximately twice a month - 2014 to 2016

Beginning in 2017 - Consumption increased to about two times per week

April 2017 - Increased to taking it full time for insomnia

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