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Do antidepressants really work?


meistersinger
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Proof that antidepressants do not work 80% of the time, from the Dana Foundation for Brain Initiatives

 

http://www.dana.org/news/features/detail_rop.aspx?id=35506

History:

1995--Prozac--Quit CT by GP

1995--Effexor--Quit per my GP

1996--Amitriphene--Quit CT when changed GP

2005--Citalopram and BusPar. Prescribed when I decompensated in my GP's office. GP referred me to behavior health. Psychiatrist prescibed these drugs. Taken off citalopram in 2011 due to FDA warning. Quit Buspar during transition to viibryd.

Viibryd--2011 to present. Had a severe reaction in March 2012. Advised both GP and Psychiatrist I was trying to get off these drugs.

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ms, who is the Dana Foundation?

 

I'm reading this as a pro-drug article, rationalizing the widespread prescription of antidepressants for whatever (and not even mentioning the risks of medication):

Given the relative safety of SSRIs it is now common for someone with the symptoms of depression to be prescribed one by their physician, generally a primary care doctor, even though the clinical trial data tell us that only about 1 in 5 such patients will respond better to the drug than placebo over the ensuing four to six weeks. The doctor, however, has no way of selecting only those patients who will benefit from these SSRIs and, therefore, given the extremely low risk of serious side effects, prescribes the drug and follows the patient to see if he or she is among the 60 to 70 percent who will improve. It is almost impossible however to know in such a real-life setting how many patients would have responded to just placebo.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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ms, who is the Dana Foundation?

 

I'm reading this as a pro-drug article, rationalizing the widespread prescription of antidepressants for whatever (and not even mentioning the risks of medication):

Given the relative safety of SSRIs it is now common for someone with the symptoms of depression to be prescribed one by their physician, generally a primary care doctor, even though the clinical trial data tell us that only about 1 in 5 such patients will respond better to the drug than placebo over the ensuing four to six weeks. The doctor, however, has no way of selecting only those patients who will benefit from these SSRIs and, therefore, given the extremely low risk of serious side effects, prescribes the drug and follows the patient to see if he or she is among the 60 to 70 percent who will improve. It is almost impossible however to know in such a real-life setting how many patients would have responded to just placebo.

From the overview on their website:

 

The Dana Foundation is a private philanthropic organization that supports brain research through grants, publications, and educational programs.

 

Link to about Dana:

http://www.dana.org/AboutDana/WhatDanaDoes.aspx

History:

1995--Prozac--Quit CT by GP

1995--Effexor--Quit per my GP

1996--Amitriphene--Quit CT when changed GP

2005--Citalopram and BusPar. Prescribed when I decompensated in my GP's office. GP referred me to behavior health. Psychiatrist prescibed these drugs. Taken off citalopram in 2011 due to FDA warning. Quit Buspar during transition to viibryd.

Viibryd--2011 to present. Had a severe reaction in March 2012. Advised both GP and Psychiatrist I was trying to get off these drugs.

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