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Rhiannon

How to make a liquid from tablets or capsules

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Rhiannon

ADMIN NOTE For tips for tapering your drug , find the link in this list  Important topics in the Tapering forum and FAQ

 

You cannot make a liquid from extended-release drugs, such as Effexor XR or bupropion XL, or drugs with a protective coating, such as Cymbalta. Many extended-release tablets are held together by a glue to retard their absorption. Mixed with water or other liquids, these tablets become a soggy glob.

 

Otherwise, given variable solubility of drugs, what you're usually doing when you mix a tablet or content capsules with water is creating a suspension, rather than a solution.

 

High solubility is not a requirement for a suspension. Substances that dissolve in solutions will be more reliably distributed evenly throughout the solution, but we have to work with what we've got. A suspension does not require solubility. It's a bunch of particles hanging in a liquid, hopefully fairly evenly distributed. There may be flakes or particles visible in the suspension, some sinking to the bottom of the vessel. We recommend shaking or stirring before drawing out a dose from a homemade suspension.

 

We have many people tapering successfully with homemade suspensions, as well as compounded suspensions and solutions. Also see

 

Pharmacy liquids to make suspensions

 

Questions and answers about liquid medications

Compounding pharmacies (US, UK, and elsewhere)

 

Making a liquid from Celexa tablets is only one example of how to do it. To skip the discussion about make a liquid with Celexa tablets specfically, jump to  "How To Make Liquid from Tablets or Capsules"  for more general information about making homemade liquids from many drugs.

 

Also see music321's post about serial dilution of liquids

 

PS Originally, Rhiannon was using a small amount of ethanol to dissolve her Celexa. She later changed her method and was successfully dissolving her tablet in water only.  That topic, Making a Celexa Solution Yourself,  has been merged into this topic; the Celexa posts have a note added at the top of the posts.  Information provided here for Celexa is also relevant to making liquids from tablets of other drugs.

 


 

 

Making a Celexa solution yourself

 

A couple of folks asked me to post here about how I dissolve my Celexa and liquid taper it that way.

 

I use a shot glass and dissolve the tablet in a small amount of water (enough to cover it) and a couple of mLs of ethanol (very pure drinking alcohol, I use "Everclear" type, available at the liquor store.) The tablet doesn't dissolve quickly, so I usually leave it there and come back in about twenty minutes.

 

From the following post (link added later by mod)

 

On 11/29/2011 at 12:40 PM, Rhiannon said:

 

Just wanted to add that I've changed my method, it's even simpler now.

 

I just dissolve the tablet in 20 mL of water directly. It does take some time to dissolve. Then I stir it up well and pipette out my dose for the day. Since I'm taking 10 mg in 20 mL, my dose is, right now, 8 mL of water, for 4 mg of Celexa. It seems to be working.

 

 

NB:  Rhiannon changed her method of dissolving citalopram.  She stopped using ethanol.  See above quote.

 

I stir it with the pipette to get the drug to dissolve into the ethanol (citalopram is soluble in ethanol). I don't know how well it actually dissolves but as long as it's mixed well it doesn't really matter.

 

Then I add enough water to bring it up to 20 mL total. I mix it well and then draw up my dose for the day, and then pipette it straight into my mouth followed by a pipette full of water (both to rinse the pipette and to dilute the "shot"!)

 

My current dose is 5.25 mg of citalopram, so given the dilution I'm using (10 mg in 20 mL) I measure 10.5 mL as my daily dose.

 

All of this could be adapted easily to using syringes for measurement instead of a pipette. (And if you are more delicate than me you could measure it into a spoon or cup rather than squirting it straight into your mouth.)

 

But using pipettes is really easy too, very simple to learn and do.

 

I'll be seeing my doctor again some time this summer and like I said elsewhere, I may see about getting the citalopram liquid already made up, but it's a $15 copay and the pills are only $5. And I'm already dissolving and pipetting my other meds anyway so it's not really any particular hassle to do it this way with the citalopram.

 

Personally this is the method I would use to taper any med. I've done the dry cutting method using a scale, and I find liquid titration easier to control. I can get my cuts as small as I want by adjusting the dilution.

 

 

Edited by Altostrata
Updated admin note

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Rhiannon

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ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Just wanted to add that I've changed my method, it's even simpler now.

 

I just dissolve the tablet in 20 mL of water directly. It does take some time to dissolve. Then I stir it up well and pipette out my dose for the day. Since I'm taking 10 mg in 20 mL, my dose is, right now, 8 mL of water, for 4 mg of Celexa. It seems to be working.

 

You could do the same thing with a syringe.

 

Really, a pipette is just a bigger syringe; a tube with lines to mark quantity, designed for sucking up and then dispensing measured amounts of liquids. Since it's bigger and actually designed for the purpose, a pipette does allow more precise measurements. But it's really the same procedure.

 

 

Edited by ChessieCat
bolded

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Altostrata

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ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

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Rhi, do you know how long the Celexa solution will keep in the fridge?

 

Edited by ChessieCat

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Rhiannon

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ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

No, I don't. I usually take all my doses of everything within 24 to 36 hours after mixing them up. So far I haven't had any noticeable problems within that time frame.

 

I just recently (when I got to 4 mg) started splitting up my Celexa dose into two doses daily, but before that I was taking it all as soon as I mixed it up.

 

There's been some discussion on Benzo Buddies about how to compound your own meds using Ora-Plus, which is what pharmacies use. I haven't tried it. But I think when people do that, they keep it longer.

 

Edited by ChessieCat

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Mar2a

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ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

On 11/30/2011 at 7:40 AM, 'Rhi' said:

Just wanted to add that I've changed my method, it's even simpler now.

 

I just dissolve the tablet in 20 mL of water directly. It does take some time to dissolve. Then I stir it up well and pipette out my dose for the day. Since I'm taking 10 mg in 20 mL, my dose is, right now, 8 mL of water, for 4 mg of Celexa. It seems to be working.

 

Thanks so much for posting! I just tried this myself.

 

I just put a 40 mg tablet in a container and added water to 10 ml (that was the maximum it would hold). I stirred it up well and poured it into a small bottle. Then I added 10 ml more of water to the container, swished it around, and poured that, too, in the bottle.

 

So now what I have is 40 mg of citalopram (Celexa) dissolved in 20 ml of water. This means that there is 2 mg of citalopram in every 1 ml of liquid. So, if I need to take 6 mg of the drug, I take 3 ml of liquid. (Could someone please check my calculations? Memory and math problems figure largely in my decision to stop citalopram.) I capped the bottle tightly and put it in the refrigerator. I plan to shake it well before each use.

 

So where did I get the equipment?

 

Container - cough syrup measuring cap. They used to always be marked off in teaspoons and tablespoons, but now a lot of them have ml markings, at least on one side.

Bottle - had a leftover brown bottle from some herbal tincture. It had a dropper, but it wasn't filling properly.

Oral syringe - I think you can buy these at drug stores (look for the pill planners), but I had an unused 3 ml syringe from cat medications. (I also have a 1 ml one, which will come in very handy when I step down some more.)

 

Edited by ChessieCat

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Altostrata

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ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Mar, your math looks correct to me.

 

You have a solution of 2mg Celexa in 1ml water. To take 6mg Celexa, take 3ml of the solution.

 

Thanks for the additional tips!

 

Edited by ChessieCat

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Rhiannon

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ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Mar2, sounds good.

 

When you get to smaller doses you might find you want to cut by smaller increments at a time. When that time comes, there are a couple of ways to do that. The simplest one would be to keep doing what you're doing now only use a lower dose pill. So for example if you did exactly what you're doing now but you were dissolving 20 mg instead of 40 mg you would have 1 mg per mL. And when you get to 10 mg you can do what you're doing and end up with 0.5 mg per mL. That will allow you to cut by smaller increments.

 

You can also dissolve the pill in more water, which would effectively do the same thing. And you could do that any time, without having to wait until you're down to smaller dose pills. For example right now if you wanted to go to 1 mg per 1 mL you could just add two more of those capfuls (20 mL) more) to your solution so you would have a total of 40 mL.

 

Hope that makes sense. Not really so much saying you need to do this or anything, but I think other people who read this might want to know.

 

Keep us posted on how this works for you. I like it that you've improvised with readily available equipment. I'm a science nerd myself and work in a lab so I'm really comfortable with graduated cylinders and pipettes, but I think they can be kind of awkward for people who haven't really ever played with them much.

 

Edited by ChessieCat

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Mar2a

Silver Star, thanks for the feedback and tips. I'll keep them in mind for my next step down.

 

As for an update: I saw my doctor and she said that the small decrease in dosage that I did should have had no effect, that the amount was biologically insignificant (I might be misquoting on that). I've been going to her a long time and she and I openly discuss our differences of opinions and work something out. She said that I could have gone from 40 right to 30, though she did agree there might be physical symptoms, but that I could ride them out because they'd last only 3-5 days.

 

So, what I'm doing now is taking 1/2 of my 40 mg (that gives me 20) and a 10mg pill (whhc she prescribed precisely for this), for a total of 30. I'll try that for a while, and continue stepping down slowly, though I might be go a little quicker than before, knowing that the physical effects from each step-down could be short-lived. I can always step back up if it isn't working out.

 

I've been trying to walk every day at lunch, which gives me the double boost of sunshine and exercise, which seems to be helping keep the emotional part easy.

 

Thanks again, everyone, for your help with this,

 

Mar2a

 

Edited by ChessieCat

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Altostrata

With all due respect to your doctor, Mar, that is exactly how people get severe withdrawal syndrome.

 

While many people can quickly withdraw from these drugs, doctors are misinformed about how difficult it may be for some people to taper these medications. Doctors usually advise tapers that are too fast and overlook signs of severe withdrawal.

 

They also believe that withdrawal symptoms are always mild and last only a few days. If you look around this site -- or the Web in general -- you will find many, many, many reports from patients that this is untrue.

 

Withdrawal symptoms are signs that your nervous system is under stress. Don't put your nervous system through ANY withdrawal symptoms if you can help it.

 

If you have ever experienced withdrawal symptoms, you are at risk for severe withdrawal. Tapering gradually reduces that risk. Small decreases are not biologically insignificant, they are gradual.

 

You may be among those who can taper quickly, but if you get ANY withdrawal symptoms following your doctor's advice, please taper more slowly. Listen to your body.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Rhiannon

"As for an update: I saw my doctor and she said that the small decrease in dosage that I did should have had no effect, that the amount was biologically insignificant (I might be misquoting on that). I've been going to her a long time and she and I openly discuss our differences of opinions and work something out. "

 

Ditto due respect, et cetera, but basically this is what doctors have been taught at school. The most-used psychopharmacology textbook in medical schools has as major contributors several psychiatrists who are paid six figures a year by pharmaceutical companies to "teach" doctors about their drugs. (Sorry--sounds Machiavellian, but it's true--doctors actually get most of their education about these meds from "authorities" well-paid by the companies who make them.)

 

The fact is that there are NO STUDIES of these drugs at small "insignificant" doses. And NO studies of their use over the long term. A long study is about three months, and the doses used in initial studies are picked sort of arbitrarily based on what seemed to affect the experimental animals (usually rats) without visibly harming them.

 

There is, however, evidence that over time the brain does change itself in response to the use of the drugs.

 

Which means that when you do studies on people who haven't been on the drugs already, the results of those studies can't really be applied to people who've been on them for a long while (who now have a chemically different brain).

 

So in actuality there's no actual scientific, medical information about what size dose, or cut, will affect someone who has been taking a med for more than a few months.

 

In real life, MANY people find that "biologically insignificant" doses of drugs have a great deal of effect, PARTICULARLY when you try to get off of them.

 

The best authority in the case of med withdrawal is your own body. I always say, start conservatively, make a small cut, and see how your body responds. Wait a long time so there's time for the lag effect to play out. If after three weeks you've felt no effect at all, make a slightly larger cut, then wait at least a month to make sure there's not going to be a cumulative effect. Continue to experiment conservatively until you know how your own body--your own biology--is going to react.

 

In other words, figure out for YOURSELF what is "biologically significant" for YOU.


Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Altostrata

That term "biologically insignificant" used by a doctor is just plain wrong. Minute amounts of chemicals in our drinking water, for example, are not biologically insignificant -- it's a concern all over the world.

 

Psychiatric drugs are probably dosed at far higher amounts than they need to be to affect the nervous system. Drug dosages are determined by pharmaceutical companies during clinical trials in an arbitrary fashion among small numbers of subjects who may not be representative of the population who will eventually take the drug.

 

If you can feel it, it's not "biologically insignificant." What a doctor is saying with this term is that any withdrawal symptoms you feel are in your imagination. This is belittling and bad medicine.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Altostrata

ADMIN NOTE This topic is a general discussion of how to make a liquid from drugs.

 

Find tips for tapering your specific drug in this list: Important topics in the Tapering forum

 

Also see

Questions and answers about liquid medications
Liquid medications -- use past expiration?
Using an oral syringe and other tapering techniques

Splitting or crushing tablets or pills
Using a digital scale to measure doses

 

Pharmacy techniques for making liquid suspensions, see:

Haywood, 2013 Liquid dosage forms extemporaneously prepared from commercially available products - considering new evidence on stability. (refers to suspensions made with pharmacy liquids)

Pharmlabs Suspensions  (external site)

Suspensions (external site)

For case-by-case consideration of what YOU should do, please put your questions in an Introductions topic. Do not put those questions in this topic, because such detailed discussion will take it off track and make this topic difficult for others to follow. The moderators will move any questions about YOUR particular case to the Introductions forum. Thank you.
 



A liquid preparation of an antidepressant or other psychiatric drug makes controlled tapering much easier. Taking part of your dosage in tablet form and part in liquid form makes the transition from tablet to liquid go smoothly.
 
Some psychiatric drugs are available from the pharmacy as a liquid, many are not. Compounding pharmacies can make liquids from many medications. A prescription is required for both types of liquid.
 
(Some medications, however, cannot be made into a liquid. Extended-release drugs such as Effexor XR, Cymbalta, and Pristiq are protected by a coating that cannot be broken. To find tips for tapering your particular drug, see Important topics in the Tapering forum and FAQ .)

If a compounding pharmacy is not an option, many people make liquid preparations themselves.
 
(This list from a UK medical group confirms that many drugs can be made into liquids: http://stockportccg.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/34838_Med_Admin_Dysphagia.pdf )

Note: Most do-it-yourself liquids are suspensions -- particles of the drug float around in the liquid, and the mixture needs to be shaken for relatively equal distribution of the particles.

 

When and how to substitute a liquid for a tablet

A liquid form of a drug will get into your system faster than a tablet. Some people can feel this difference.

 

The easiest way to substitute a liquid for a tablet is to ease into it -- take part of your dose in tablet form and part in liquid. After you get used to this for 4 days or more, substitute the liquid for the rest of the dose.

 

While you're making the substitution, do not make a decrease in your total daily dose. You need to see how you do with the substitution of the liquid before you continue to taper. If, over 4 days or more, the liquid dose seems too strong for you, you may want to reduce it slightly and continue your taper after you stabilize.
 

If it's more convenient for you, it's fine to continue to take part of your dose in tablet form and part in liquid form.


How to make a medication in tablet or capsule form into a liquid
As an overview, here is a video about making a liquid from a naltrexone tablet. Naltrexone is not a psychiatric drug, but the principles are the same:

 

 

 


 
(Refrigeration of the batch is not necessary while the tablets dissolve. Refrigerate the liquid afterwards, though.)
 
Below are general instructions for making your own liquid with water or pharmacy liquid.
 
Basically, you need
- the drug, as a tablet or powder from a capsule
- water or Pharmacy liquids to make suspensions
- a way to measure the amount of water or pharmacy liquid (oral syringe, pipette, measured container or graduated cylinder; a graduated cylinder is probably easiest)
- a clean container with a cap in which to keep your liquid

Try to be very consistent with your method every time you make a batch of liquid -- do everything in the same order, with the same equipment.

 

Don't worry about "compounding losses", the amount of powder that sticks to implements.
 
Assemble your equipment
1. Obtain a way to measure the water or pharmacy liquid

  • A 10cc (10mL) or 20cc (20mL) oral syringe (as seen in the video) OR
  • A 100cc (100mL) medicine bottle from the pharmacy. These usually have markings showing 100cc or mL (ask for the cap with the hole in it, so you can fit the oral syringe in it to draw from the bottle). There should be no charge or a very small charge. OR
  • A graduated cylinder marked with ccs or mLs. Graduated cylinders are more exact than oral syringes or medicine bottles and best for large volumes of liquid)

2. A small clean transparent wide-mouthed jar with a water-tight top or an empty tinted plastic medicine container with a top.
 
3. If your medication is in tablet form, a pill cutter or crusher. (This is optional. You can cut a tablet with a knife and crush it, if necessary, with the back of a spoon.)
 
4. Depending on how much medication you wish to take, a .5mL, 1mL, 5mL, or 10mL oral syringe to take a measured amount of the drug.

How to mix the liquid
 
1. Prepare the drug.
 

On 4/13/2014 at 10:19 AM, Rhi said:

....
If you want to make your own liquid you may not need to crush the pill. I don't recommend it, because small amounts are lost as powder. First just try putting it in water and see if the pill dissolves on its own. It may take a little while, my one that's coated takes about ten minutes. If it doesn't dissolve in water then try to crush it directly in the container that you're going to be adding water to, so powder won't be lost.
....

 
Alternatively, if your medication is in tablet form, you can

  • cut the tablet up into rough quarters with a pill cutter or knife
  • crush the tablet into powder using a pill crusher or mortar and pestle
  • cut it up and carefully crush it with the back of a spoon on a piece of waxed paper

If your medication is a powder in a capsule, carefully open the capsule above the container and pour the contents into the bottom of the container.

To open a capsule, grasp each end in your fingers and gently twist. The capsule should come apart in the middle. Do this over the open container, to catch the powder in the container.
 
2. Measure the water (or pharmacy liquid)

  • With an oral syringe: Draw room temperature (not hot, not cold) water into an oral syringe and convey it to the container. A 10mL (10cc) or 20mL (20cc) oral syringe is handy for this purpose.[br][br][br]

    For example, if you wish to make 30mL of a solution, fill the 10mL syringe 3 times with clean water and inject it into your container.
  • With a graduated cylinder: For example, if you wish to make 30mL of a solution, fill the graduated cylinder to the 30mL mark and pour it into the container.
  • With a 100cc (100mL) medicine bottle: Fill carefully to the 100cc or 100mL line. You'll have to bring the bottle up to your eye level to do this. Please note the measurements on these bottles are less exact than the graduated cylinder.

To mix, put the cap on the container, tightly, and shake it gently. You will be able to see particles swirling around in the water (some of the filler used in tablets and capsules is insoluble).
 
Wait until the tablet chunks are dissolved before taking a dose.
 
How much liquid should I use to make my suspension?
The only tricky thing about making a solution is creating and remembering the concentration: the ratio of drug to liquid.

The easiest concentration is 1:1 or 1mg medication in 1mL solution. Examples:

  • If you want to take 18mg Prozac, for example, you can mix 20mg with 20mL water and take 18mL, which contains 18mg Prozac.
  • You could put a 10mg Paxil tablet in 10mL water for a 1:1 dilution. There would be 1mg in 1mL and 0.1mg in 0.1mL. The 1:1 dilution would require a small 1mL oral syringe. To reduce 10% from 1.1mg, you would take 1mL. Another 10% reduction would be 0.9mL.
  • You may find a 1:1 dilution to be a little thick or grainy. For convenience, you may wish to make a higher dilution of a 10mg tablet in 20mg water for a 1:2 ratio. There would be 1mg in 2mL and 0.1mg in 0.2mL. If you made this liquid, your dose would be 2.2mL (1.1mg). To reduce by 10%, you would take 2mL (1mg).

For doses of hundreds of milligrams, you may want to make a higher concentration. Examples:

  • To taper from 100mg Lyrica to 90mg, you can mix 100mg Lyrica in 50mL water, making a 2:1 concentration, each 1mL containing 2mg Lyrica.
  • Or, you can mix 100mg Lyrica in 25mL water, making a 4:1 concentration, each 1mL containing 4mg Lyrica.

Keep a note of the concentration! Be sure make a note of your recipe ("100mg Lyrica in 50mL water") and dosage instructions to yourself: "Take 45mL for 90mg Lyrica."
 
What if my medication is "insoluble" in water?
About solubility or insolubility, our esteemed member Rhi, who has lab experience, has made many, many homemade liquids:

 

On 2/27/2013 at 9:30 AM, Rhiannon said:

.... I just wanted to toss in my usual bit on the subject of making preparations for liquid tapering, which is: I personally don't worry about solubility.
 
None of the meds I'm tapering are actually soluble in water. But the pills dissolve into small enough particles that I can stir them up and keep them suspended in water while I measure them out, and that seems to work for me. I stir well before I measure, I stir a little while pipetting them up; I dissolve the pills in glass and pipette out of glass so that I can see visually how evenly everything is suspended, and that's good enough for me.
 
I use water as a medium because I like it that I can easily see for myself how evenly the little particles are suspended or if they seem to be settling out. Also because it's handy and cheap and I don't have to carry it with me if I travel.
 
Mostly I would just say, I don't think it really matters if the medication is soluble in whatever vehicle you're using, as long as it can be evenly distributed. What really matters is that it be evenly distributed and that your method be repeatable and consistent.

 
Measure your dose and take it
With a liquid, you use an oral syringe to take the dosage you wish.

  • Get your oral syringe ready.
  • Put the cap on the container and shake it gently. (You may see particles swirling around, this is normal.)
  • Using the oral syringe, draw from the middle of the liquid, not from the top -- there may be less drug there, it sinks to the bottom.
  • If your bottle cap has a hole in the top, draw the liquid from the bottle by following these instructions.
  • If this is still confusing, ask your pharmacist to show you how to use an oral syringe

Ex: If your liquid is a 1:1 concentration, containing 1mg in 1mL, and you want to take .5mg, you would take .5mL of the liquid. You can adjust the amount you take as you continue your taper. See Using an oral syringe and other tapering techniques

Also see http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/235-using-an-oral-syringe-and-other-tapering-techniques/page__view__findpost__p__50942
 
Refrigerate homemade liquids
Most homemade solutions may keep for at least a few days, refrigerated. Drugs tend to be degraded by heat and light, which is why pharmacy containers are tinted.
 
Refrigeration delays the growth of bacteria and mold in your homemade liquid, which was not made under sterile conditions.
 
To find tips for your particular drug
See Important topics in the Tapering forum and FAQ . (You can also Google your "medication soluble stability" to see how long yours will keep.)
 
For more information, consult a pharmacist.

 

 

Edited by Altostrata
updated

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Skyler

Where do I buy these syringes. I see some on amazon. They don't say graduated though.

 

I'll PM you with local info. Most syringes are graduated, so you usually don't see this in the description. Those from compounding pharmacies are best as they are made for repeat dosing and the print does not smudge.

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 

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Shanti

If only I'd had this information 10 years ago (sigh).

 

I know right. I feel for the people that had no help and information like this. Do you know if an oral dropper is as accurate as an oral syringe?

 

Posted Image


Taper from Cymbalta, Paxil, Prozac & Antipsychotics finished June 2012.

Xanax 5% Taper - (8/12 - .5 mg) - (9/12 - .45) - (10/12 - .43) - (11/12 - .41) - (12/12 - .38)

My Paxil Website

My Intro

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Rhiannon

A dropper is not likely to be as accurate as a syringe.

 

However, if it's all you can get, it's better than nothing.

 

If you're using a fairly concentrated liquid, accuracy is more important. If you're using a really dilute solution you can get away with less accurate measuring apparatus.

 

Also, Alto wanted me to mention something about the use of graduated cylinders.

 

I use graduated cylinders and pipettes for my own taper and measuring. (Pipettes are basically equivalent to syringes--just bigger.)

 

If the biggest syringe or pipette you have is 10 mL, and you want to measure out more than about 40 mL of water, it's better to use a graduated cylinder. (Otherwise you can do four or fewer pulls on the syringe)..

 

If you Google "graduated cylinder" or look on Amazon, you can see what a graduated cylinder looks like. It's tall and cylindrical with small markings all along its length for measuring. You may want to Google "beaker" too so you can see the difference and not get them confused.

 

Graduated cylinders are easily available via Amazon or other websites.

 

And before you use the cylinder, if you haven't used one before, read this: http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemistrylabexperiments/qt/meniscus.htm

 

To repeat, if you need to measure out more than about 40 mL and you don't have a syringe that large, you'll get the most consistent results using a graduated cylinder. (If you do more than about four pulls with your syringe, you're going to be introducing a lot of random error into your total measurement, enough that it could affect your dosing.)


Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Shanti

Thanks Rhi, again :)

 

I was wondering why the graduated cylinder was more precise in measuring than a regular measuring cup. That article helped, as it does stand to reason now that the wider the cup, the more accuracy is lost due to the "meniscus" issue. Good information. I went ahead and accepted the graduated cylinder I bought at Amazon. I got a plastic one and it was only about $7.

 

I need the syringe for pulling out my reduction amount. After my failed attempts at sloppy tapers with the Xanax, I want to be precise and get it right now.


Taper from Cymbalta, Paxil, Prozac & Antipsychotics finished June 2012.

Xanax 5% Taper - (8/12 - .5 mg) - (9/12 - .45) - (10/12 - .43) - (11/12 - .41) - (12/12 - .38)

My Paxil Website

My Intro

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Aria

I was on a powered capsule benzo and it tended to dump too quickly for me to get an adequate removal. I went to see a compounding pharmacist who made up a suspension agent to mix my capsule with. I shook the powder and agent together in a closed jar. The powder was distributed more equally and stayed suspended in the mixture. I got a much more accurate removal each time. I was able to keep the mixed portion in the refrigerator to reuse for 4-5 days. The suspension agent was about $ 10.00 (about one pint) which I was able to use in new mixtures over a few weeks.

 

I measured the amount of suspension agent I needed for calculated titration into the calibrated tubes. It was like being a chemist but it worked for me.


Poly drugged for 18 years with every psychiatric drug in the PDR. C/t off Seroquel, tapered trazodone, celexa, dalmane, ativan (among others) and have been drug free for years. I thank the heavens I survived.

Link to my Introduction thread: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/2477-aria-my-psych-journey/

Reading my psychiatric records: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/5466-drugged-crazy-reading-my-psychiatric-records/

My Success Story is listed under "Aria's Recovery".

 

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Altostrata

Thanks for that excellent suggestion, Aria -- rather than water, get a liquid from a compounding pharmacy to mix with your medication.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Rhiannon

Precision Versus Accuracy:

 

When tapering, precision is more important than accuracy.

 

For this sentence to make sense you need to know the difference between "precision" and "accuracy." It's not a distinction commonly made in everyday speech.

 

Accuracy is how correct a measurement is. If you measure using a certain container or syringe, is the amount you measure really correct? You could have a container that's off, that says it holds 10 mL when it really only holds 9.5 mL, or says it holds 2 cups when if carefully checked it actually holds two and an eighth cups. If you measured using those, your amounts would not be accurate.

 

Precision is how close and how repeatable a measurement is. If you have a measuring device that says it measures 1.5 mL but when you use it you actually get 1.4 mL, it's not accurate, but it can still be precise. If when you use it five times you get, say, 1.41 mL, 1.4 mL, 1.415 mL, 1.39 mL, and 1.385 mL, that's pretty precise, even though it's not accurate. But if you get, say, 1.7 mL, 1.2 mL, 1.85 mL, 1.6 mL, and 1.1 mL, it's not only not accurate, it's also not precise.

 

This is the concept that's tricky. When I learned it there was a picture of a dartboard. Unfortunately I don't have that picture, so I'll describe it and hope that works.

 

Imagine a dartboard. It has the usual round target shape with the central circle that you're shooting for. Now imagine that someone has thrown five darts at it.

 

Case 1: The five darts are all in a tight cluster the middle at the target. That's accurate and precise.

 

Case 2: The five darts are kind of in a circle around the center of the target. That's accurate, but not precise.

 

Case 3: The five darts are all in a tight cluster but on some other part of the board, not at the center of the target. That's precise, but not accurate.

 

Case 4: The five darts are all over the place. That's neither precise nor accurate.

 

So how does this apply to tapering? Well, in tapering, what really matters is how closely you can control changes in your dose. It doesn't really matter so much if you're measuring exactly 1.5 mL, but whatever you ARE measuring it needs to be pretty much the same each time, not all over the place so you're getting really different doses each time.

 

So, for example, I don't think syringes are as accurate as pipettes, but I think they're just as precise, so for tapering purposes they're just fine.

 

A cooking measuring cup isn't as accurate as labware, and unfortunately it's not very precise either; 2 mL more or less isn't going to make much difference in a recipe, so you don't need to use graduated cylinders to make a pie.

 

An eyedropper or medicine dropper is probably fairly accurate, give or take, but it's not precise--very difficult to control the measurement so that it's really the same amount each time.

 

A plastic graduated cylinder that was made in China for science fair experiments is probably not going to be as accurate as quality labware, but as long as you use it the same way every time (measure with the meniscus in the same place every time) it's going to be just as precise.

 

The important thing with tapering is that the measurements need to be consistent and repeatable and done the same way every time, so you don't get big variations in dosage, and they need to be done using equipment that's designed to be precise.

 

Hope this makes sense! If it doesn't, don't worry about it. You'll be fine regardless. But I thought I'd explain it for people who are doing their own liquid tapers and might find these concepts helpful to play with.


Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Altostrata

Very good point, Rhi. Consistency in measurement, which often means using the same devices the same way each time you measure, is the key.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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primrose

Hi

 

Please may I ask a question?

Use the oral syringe to measure room temperature (not hot, not cold) water and convey it to the container. A 10mL (10cc) oral syringe is handy for this purpose.

Why does the water have to be room temp?

 

Thanks


pregan taper 600mg down to 240mg, daily cuts since xmas

valium, just over 75mg, tapering 0.1 a day, will keep this more udated, cos amounts going down

i have borderline personality, chronic ptsd, and suspected adhd and substance misuse as a symptom, which i am addressing with help of medical staff, drugs agencies & mh sta

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Altostrata

Because the powder may not dissolve in cold water, and hot water might damage the chemicals.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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areyouthere

Another way to look at it. It is ok if the measuring instrument that you are using is " precisely inaccurate " . IOW , as long as it is measuring "consistently wrong" you can be confident that you are taking the same dose. Precisely inaccurate is a much, much better way to understand the concept but consistently wrong may make more sense until you can wrap your head around what Rhi so eloquently explains.

 

I think the key here is that we all want to make sure that we are reducing our dose by as close to exactly the same amount each day so that we can eliminate second guessing like " I wonder if I have this symptom because I took a slightly different dose yesterday or the day before or the day before that " .

 

 

Consistency in measurement, which often means using the same devices the same way each time you measure, is the key.

 

Exactly. Or I should say. Precisely :P

Fall 1995 xanax, zoloft. switched to Serzone

1996- spring 2003serzone/ xanax/ lightbox.

b]Fall 2003- Fall 2004? Lexapro 10 mg. Light box /4 mg. xanax.[/b]

2004 - Fall of 2009 10 mg Lex, 150 mg Wellbutrin XL % 4 mg xanax

November 2009- Sept. 2011 10 mg lex., 300 Well. XL, 4 mg Xanax [/b

Sept.2012- July 2012 20 mg Lex 300 Well. XL, 4 mg Xanax

My mantra " go slow & with the flow "

3/2/13.. Began equal dosing 5 Xs /day xanax, while simultaneously incorporating a 2.5 % drop ( from 3.5 mg/day to 3.4 mg/day)

4/6/13 dropped from 300 mg. Wellbutrin XL to 150 mg. Difficult but DONE! Down to 3.3 mg xanax/ day / 6/10/13 3 mg xanax/day; 7/15/2013 2.88mg xanax/day.

10/ 1/2013...... 2.5 mg xanax… ( switched to tablets again) WOO HOO!!!!!! Holding here… cont. with Lexapro.

1/ 2/2014.. tapered to 18mg ( by weight) of a 26 mg ( by weight) pill of 20 mg tab. lexapro. goal is 13mg (by weight OR 10 mg by ingredient content) and STOPPED. Feeling very down with unbalanced, unpredictable WD symptoms.

1/2/2014- ??? Taking a brain-healing break from tapering anything after actively tapering something for 1.5 years. So… daily doses as of 2/2/2014: 18 mg by weight Lex, 150 mg Well. XL, 2.5 mg xanax, down from 26 mg by weight Lex., 300 mg well. XL, 4 mg xanax in August, 2012. I'll take it. :) 5/8/14 started equivalent dose liquid./ tabs. 5/13/14 1.5 % cut.

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Altostrata

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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ChanceLucky

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Have you asked your doctor if this solution will work just as effectively as the actual pill would? I'm thinking about doing this too.

 

Edited by ChessieCat

-I was on an SSRI (most recently Celexa at 40mg/day) for about 15 years for anxiety. I tapered off over about 8 months and in 2015 and had worsened anxiety and well-being once off it. In the fall of 2015 (I believe) I did a low dose reinstatement and was doing better. I stayed on roughly 1 ml (2 mg) for a while but eventually lowered it to .5 ml and was on this for a long time.

-Around late mid May (2017) my anxiety was worse and I increased the Celexa to 1.5 ml. At first, I felt significantly better but I developed a hand tremor. I also was having some attention and concentration difficulties. In mid July (over about 2 weeks) I tapered off of the Celexa and was off it for about 2 1/2 weeks before I started to feel an intense increase in anxiety and my hand tremor returned.

-Aug 13, 2017 I did a low dose reinstatement of 0.5 ml a day and am currently still taking that. Initial response is good.

-Early September 2017 to present - hand tremor returns and attention and concentration are impaired. Feeling of unbalance/unsteadiness from using treadmill. Mild changes to sexual performance too.

-Sept 18, 2017: 0.4 ml Celexa. Everything is generally improving although hand tremor is worse. Attention, concentration, and anxiety are good.

-I am also on Wellbutrin (200 mg/day) for anxiety and take a Benadryl at night for sleep and allergies. Eventually I'd like to be off everything.

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/9730-chancelucky-antidepressant-withdrawal-social-anxiety-pessimism/

 

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Altostrata

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ORIGINAL TOPIC:  Making a Celexa Solution Yourself

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

On 12/21/2012 at 3:24 AM, ChanceLucky said:

 

Have you asked your doctor if this solution will work just as effectively as the actual pill would? I'm thinking about doing this too.

 

 

 

Rhi's been doing this for ages and has a lab background, I'd trust her on this.

 

Edited by ChessieCat

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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ladybug

What about the colored coating of the pills? Would you just mix this in the water as well?


a.k.a JMarie

Paxil since Mar.1998

2006-2007:40-20mg
2009: 20mg to 14mg 2010: 14mg to 10.5mg 2011: 10.5 to 7.6mg  2012: 7.5 to 6.8mg

2013: 6.7-6.3mg 2014: 6.2mg-5.8mg 2015: 5.7 to 5.15mg 2016: 5.1-4.6mg

1/19/17: 4.5mg 3/17/17: 4.4mg

6/15/17: 4.35mg 8/10/17: 4.3mg

1/29/18: 4.1mg 5/07/18: 4.0mg

7/31/18: 3.9mg

 

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Altostrata

What drug are you referring to? Does it have a hard coating?


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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ladybug

What drug are you referring to? Does it have a hard coating?

I'm referring to brand name Paxil, which all have a soft colored coating.


a.k.a JMarie

Paxil since Mar.1998

2006-2007:40-20mg
2009: 20mg to 14mg 2010: 14mg to 10.5mg 2011: 10.5 to 7.6mg  2012: 7.5 to 6.8mg

2013: 6.7-6.3mg 2014: 6.2mg-5.8mg 2015: 5.7 to 5.15mg 2016: 5.1-4.6mg

1/19/17: 4.5mg 3/17/17: 4.4mg

6/15/17: 4.35mg 8/10/17: 4.3mg

1/29/18: 4.1mg 5/07/18: 4.0mg

7/31/18: 3.9mg

 

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Altostrata

I would crush it, dissolve it well, and make sure to shake the suspension before drawing out a dose.

 

Paxil is available in a liquid, which would be preferable.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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ladybug

I would crush it, dissolve it well, and make sure to shake the suspension before drawing out a dose.Paxil is available in a liquid, which would be preferable.

I know, but it's insanely expensive if you are uninsured. Like $250 a bottle or something. I'm also scared of the switch, since some people do not tolerate the liquid Paxil well. I can't even tolerate generic Paxil so I always figured I would be one of those unlucky ones who wouldn't be able to tolerate the liquid Paxil. I'm just scared that my shaving and weighing is not giving me an accurate dose, and at these low doses that's so important.


a.k.a JMarie

Paxil since Mar.1998

2006-2007:40-20mg
2009: 20mg to 14mg 2010: 14mg to 10.5mg 2011: 10.5 to 7.6mg  2012: 7.5 to 6.8mg

2013: 6.7-6.3mg 2014: 6.2mg-5.8mg 2015: 5.7 to 5.15mg 2016: 5.1-4.6mg

1/19/17: 4.5mg 3/17/17: 4.4mg

6/15/17: 4.35mg 8/10/17: 4.3mg

1/29/18: 4.1mg 5/07/18: 4.0mg

7/31/18: 3.9mg

 

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mammaP

I have been experimenting today with effexor beads (brand rodomel). I dropped from 

4 beads to 3 on 2nd November, a reduction of 25% because there was no choice. The 

capsules are slow release and contain 400 beads. Who would think that just 1 bead

could lead to withdrawal symptoms? All was fine for around 4 weeks then the dreaded 

insomnia came. 

I decided to try and dissolve the beads for the rest of my  taper.

 

After 5 hours sitting in water they were still whole and floating on water.

 I took a fresh one and crushed it in a pill crusher then added a teaspoon of water.

The shell did not dissolve but went clear and floated on top of the water.

The powder seemed to settle on the bottom so I picked off the shell with tweezers.

I swirled the liquid around but couldn't see the powder in the liquid so I assume it dissolved

 I will be trying this when it's time for my next drop, 

Watch this space! 

Edited by mammaP
Corrections

**I am not a medical professional, if in doubt please consult a doctor with withdrawal knowledge.

 

 

Different drugs occasionally (mostly benzos) 1976 - 1981 (no problem)

1993 - 2002 in and out of hospital. every type of drug + ECT. Staring with seroxat

2002  effexor. 

Tapered  March 2012 to March 2013, ending with 5 beads.

Withdrawal April 2013 . Reinstated 5 beads reduced to 4 beads May 2013

Restarted taper  Nov 2013  

OFF EFFEXOR Feb 2015    :D 

Tapered atenolol and omeprazole Dec 2013 - May 2014

 

Tapering tramadol, Feb 2015 100mg , March 2015 50mg  

 July 2017 30mg.  May 15 2018 25mg

Taking fish oil, magnesium, B12, folic acid, bilberry eyebright for eye pressure. 

 

My story http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/4199-hello-mammap-checking-in/page-33

 

Lesson learned, slow down taper at lower doses. Taper no more than 10% of CURRENT dose if possible

 

 

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Nikki

The easiest concentration is 1:1 or 1mg medication in 1mL solution. If you want to take 18mg Prozac, for example, you can mix 20mg with 20mL water and take 18mL, which contains 18mg Prozac

 

Alto if I am taking 50mgs. Serzone what size syringe should I get and does this mean I would fill a syringe with 50mgs. or 50mL of water - crush a 50mg. tablet - mix and then withdraw 40mgs. to drop one mg.?

 

This stuff confuses the daylights out of me


Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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Altostrata

Nikki, you explained it yourself.

 

If you make a 1:1 solution of 50mg in 50mL, you would take 45mL to accomplish a decrease of 5mg (10%).

 

It might be handier to make a solution of 50mg in 10mL (5:1). To decrease by 10%, or , you'd take 9mL.

 

Either way, it might be easiest to remove the decrement and throw it away, then drink the rest.

 

Please ask a pharmacist to help you decide on what oral syringe to use.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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Nikki

thank you....yes I did answer it myself but I made a typo meant to type 49 instead of 40...


Intro: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1902-nikki-hi-my-rundown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine

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moodyblues78

It seems to the rule that you should not store your DIY liquid for more than 3-4 days.

 

Doesn`t that prove the fact that the liquid is losing it`s medical effect very fast? So even if make only 3 days worth of medicine, every dose is less effective that previous?

 

I`m noticing a pattern that I feel better when I take my 1st dose. Days 2 and 3 are downhill and things get a little better when I make a new patch. I can not be sure about this yet but I`m very scared to experiment any further.


08 Cipralex 10mg for about 6 months. 11-12 Cipralex 20mg. Unsuccesful WD. 12-13 Zoloft 100mg with Diazepam 10-20mg as needed for anxiety.
Fall 13 Tapering Zoloft 100->50->25->12,5->0 in 2,5 months and CT Diazepam. 12/24/13 RI Zoloft 12,5mg
.

1/21/14 11mg

3/18/14 9,9mg

2/18/14 8mg

4/22/14 7,6mg

5/5/14 7,2mg

5/12/14 -> cutting 0,5mg per week, holding when necessary.

8/18/14 -> cutting 0,25mg per week holding when necessary.

10/20/2014 -> cutting 0,1mg per week, holding when necessary.
12/28/2014 Jump!

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