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Suicidality and Antidepressants

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GSK study suggests its antidepressant drugs cause suicidal tendencies

 

www.naturalnews.com

by Ethan A. Huff

April 16, 2011

 

A new study released by drug giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) suggests that its very own antidepressant drug Paxil (paroxetine) is linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and tendencies among adult patients. The findings appear to confirm those of previous studies and cases that have linked selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) like Paxil to suicides, suicide attempts, and even murders (http://www.naturalnews.com/019342.html).

 

Published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry [online 22 Feb 11], the GSK study reveals a nearly sevenfold increase in suicide attempts among those taking Paxil versus those taking a placebo. In clinical trials, 0.34 percent of participants taking Paxil attempted suicide, while only 0.05 percent of those taking a placebo did.

 

Besides increasing the risk of suicidal tendencies, a GSK study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in early 2010 showed that Paxil does not even appear to work as intended in patients with varying levels depression (http://www.naturalnews.com/027962_Paxil_antidepressants.html). Combine this with the fact that Paxil technically makes depression symptoms worse by causing more suicides and suicide attempts, and you are left asking how or why this drug ended up on the market in the first place.....

 

A 2009 study published in the online journal PLoS One revealed that among 832 different drugs, which represent 99 percent of the total suicide-related events reported in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), Paxil was the worst of all. Among the 27,012 adverse events reported for suicide attempts between 2004 and 2008, 1,323, or 4.9 percent, were linked to Paxil (http://www.plosone.org/article/info...).

 

 

Read the whole article at:

 

http://www.naturalnews.com/032097_antidepressants_suicidal_tendencies.html

 

http://article.psychiatrist.com/dao_1-login.asp?ID=10007308&RSID=5560388475179

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Healing

Experts say antidepressant drugs cause suicides instead of preventing them

 

www.naturalnews.com

by Dani Veracity

April 10, 2006

 

http://www.naturalnews.com/019342.html

 

....In Health and Nutrition Secrets, Dr. Russell L. Blaylock writes, "It is also known that these medications increase brain levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which, in high concentrations, can also act as an excitotoxin." When antidepressant drugs raise serotonin to an excitotoxin level, the brain reacts in ways similar to mental illness. According to Burton Goldberg's book, Alternative Medicine, side effects of SSRIs include uncontrollable facial and body tics, dizziness, hallucinations, nausea, sexual dysfunction, addiction, electric-shock-like sensations in the brain and, of course, homicidal or suicidal thoughts and behavior.....

 

 

This article is well-researched and has good quotes collected from Glenmullen, Tracey, and others on the following topics. It's a good resource, if you're gathering quotes on --

 

"Legal verdicts on antidepressant drugs and suicide"

 

"Do doctors prescribe SSRIs too often?"

 

"Many research and case studies demonstrate a link between antidepressants and suicide and other violent behavior"

 

"Studies show that Prozac, in particular, plays an especially large role in suicide and other violent behavior"

 

"Eli Lilly's staunch defense of Prozac"

 

"Some research studies and government organizations have ties to the pharmaceutical industry"

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