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Is everyone as tired of this as I am


compsports
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Is everyone as tired as I am of the suicide of Jacintha Saldanha being blamed on mental health issues with no responsibility being placed on the sick humor that exists in the media outlet today that seeks to increase ratings at people's expense?

 

On a related note, I found this article chilling as it is sympathetic towards the radio hosts and wants to totally blame the nurse's mental health issues for her suicide. I agree the DJs can't be blame for her death but they are certainly aren't innocent and don't deserve the sympathy this article wants to give them.

 

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/12/08/kate-middleton-radio-prank-gone-awry-who-should-we-blame/

 

By the way, didn't the psychiatrist quoted, Patrick McCorry, want to medicate young kids with antispychotics who showed possible signs of schizophrenia?

 

CS

Drug cocktail 1995 - 2010
Started taper of Adderall, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron, and Doxepin in 2006
Finished taper on June 10, 2010

Temazepam on a PRN basis approximately twice a month - 2014 to 2016

Beginning in 2017 - Consumption increased to about two times per week

April 2017 - Increased to taking it full time for insomnia

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"Also lost in this tragedy is any sense of perspective — as though a single action, incident or behavior could lead someone to end their lives. While I’m sure it could happen in some fictional world, in the real world most people choose a suicidal act only when at the end of a long, desperate rope of depression."

 

 

Compsports... the above quote is from the article you mentioned.

 

Radio talk show hosts have pranked people as far back as I can remember. You see pranks on TV all the time and most of us laugh at them. Alan Funt was the original prankster.

 

What happened is a prank that turned into a terrible tragedy. I don't think the DJs saw this coming and I don't agree they are to blame. They never expected that anyone would even talk to them, no less convey personal information... which really wasn't so personal. "She is feeling better" is all they were told.

 

I'm not saying this woman had an illness of any nature - I didn't know her - but I agree with the above quote.

 

 

Charter Member 2011

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"Also lost in this tragedy is any sense of perspective — as though a single action, incident or behavior could lead someone to end their lives. While I’m sure it could happen in some fictional world, in the real world most people choose a suicidal act only when at the end of a long, desperate rope of depression."

 

 

Compsports... the above quote is from the article you mentioned.

 

Radio talk show hosts have pranked people as far back as I can remember. You see pranks on TV all the time and most of us laugh at them. Alan Funt was the original prankster.

 

What happened is a prank that turned into a terrible tragedy. I don't think the DJs saw this coming and I don't agree they are to blame. They never expected that anyone would even talk to them, no less convey personal information... which really wasn't so personal. "She is feeling better" is all they were told.

 

I'm not saying this woman had an illness of any nature - I didn't know her - but I agree with the above quote.

 

Again, many points are being missed.

 

This isn't about a harmless prank as it was an attempt to get medical information released over the air at someone's expense No, the DJs are not responsible for the nurse's death but when you engage in an act like this all for getting ratings, you are definitely not innocent as this is a despicable act.

 

This article by Bel Mooney does a great job of discussing the issues:

 

http://tinyurl.com/c8wq2qj

 

""Those two DJs were willing and able to indulge in the bullying of an unsuspecting victim because exploiting the naivety of innocent victims is now the accepted dialect of light entertainment right across the world.

 

Before you blame the crass taste of Aussie presenters, remember it was only weeks ago that ITV set up a stunt on I’m a Celebrity in which the actress Charlie Brooks was left weeping after she was denied the right to see her seven-year-old daughter for failing to win a jungle challenge, as the little girl hid behind a set door.

 

The truth is, we have become so inured to a culture of hard-edged cleverness that it wouldn’t have occurred to Mel Greig or Michael Christian to stop, to think for a moment – and feel shamed – any more than it occurred to ITV that it was wrong to exploit a seven-year-old’s distress to chase ratings.

 

At least Charlie Brooks must have signed a consent form at some stage. Not so Jacintha Saldanha. Why then did the radio station’s lawyers allow the tapes to be broadcast? For the very same reason that the BBC turned a blind eye to the crude phone call made by Russell Brand and Jonathan Ross to Andrew Sachs, sniggering about his granddaughter’s sex life. Because no single executive had the taste, judgment or maturity to realise that this was totally unacceptable behaviour. Nobody, from the immature broadcasters to the worldly men and women in charge, had the wisdom or decency to say: ‘Hang on, this isn’t funny, it’s wrong.’

 

Thus casual cruelty is dished up as prime-time entertainment with as much callous indifference as the Romans showed to the Christians and lions fighting to the death in their arenas.

 

What’s more, it’s getting worse, as new media challenges the old for an audience. Sometimes Twitter seems as brutal as a bearpit, as trolls seek out their prey to persecute. And unlike the mainstream media, the internet has given bullies the cloak of anonymity to hide behind."

 

As as not believing that one act can cause someone to commit suicide, you and experts are making the mistake of basing that on western values. In India, it is a totally different ballgame in which "honor" is a big deal."

 

Also, according to one of the woman's suicide notes, management was very rough on her in spite of their public claim that they offered nothing but support. In reading comments from RNs who state that nurses who disclose confidential information are dealt with harshly, I believe the poor woman over the hospital.

 

In that light, it was tragically very understandable that she felt that suicide was her only option.

 

So again, the DJs aren't responsible but as I previously mentioned, when you decide to commit a "prank" to get someone to release medical information at their expense, you are definitely not innocent bystanders.

 

Anyway, back to my original point - It is easier to blame someone for having a mental illness vs. taking a critical look at our failings which include endorsing pranks that aren't funny but destroy people in the process.

 

CS

Drug cocktail 1995 - 2010
Started taper of Adderall, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron, and Doxepin in 2006
Finished taper on June 10, 2010

Temazepam on a PRN basis approximately twice a month - 2014 to 2016

Beginning in 2017 - Consumption increased to about two times per week

April 2017 - Increased to taking it full time for insomnia

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I understand the point you make - we live in a world that knows no bounds.

 

Thing is... most of us search for things that make us smile. There isn't much these days...

 

 

Charter Member 2011

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In the UK this story has been debated all week. I've always felt uncomfortable about prank phone calls on radio shows, I used to hear them on Radio 1 and feel deeply uncomfortable about them.

This nurse was going about her work and daily life,who knows what other issues she had going on in her life? next thing she knows she is the victim of a prank that's gone viral, imagine the embarrasment, shame and humiliation she felt and it wasn't going to go away. She didn't ask to be world news. She probably got a bollocking about it at work, I have a feeling she wasn't as supported by the hospital as they make out. I think there is a lot of cruelty dressed up as entertainment nowadays.

Another example is Sir Alan Sugar on The Apprentice which appears to condone corporate bullying or Dragons Den, the same.

*** Please note this is not medical advice,discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner***





http://prozacwithdrawal.blogspot.com/
Original drug was sertraline/Zoloft, switched to Prozac in 2007.
Tapering from 5mls liquid prozac since Feb 2008, got down to 0.85ml 23/09/2012, reinstated back to 1ml(4mg) 07/11/2012, didn't appear to work, upped to 1.05ml 17/11/2012, back down to 1ml 12/12/2012 didn't work, up to 1.30ml 16/3/2013 didn't work, bumped up to 2ml (8mg) 4/4/2013 didn't work, in July 2013 I reinstated Sertraline (Zoloft) 50mg, feeling better now. 

A few months down the line I switched to 5ml liquid Prozac and tapered down to a compromise dose of 3ml liquid Prozac and have stayed there ever since, no withdrawals and no emotional blunting/loss of libido.

 

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