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Vitamin E (tocopherol)

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Altostrata

Generally, it is recommended to take vitamin E with fish oil because it helps metabolize the fish oil. Some fish oils come combined with vitamin E.

 

See http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/36-king-of-supplements-omega-3-fatty-acids-fish-oil/

 

To help fish oil to work, take it with 400IU vitamin E per day. This helps metabolize the fish oil. A good type of vitamin E to take is mixed tocopherols -- they've been shown to have other health benefits. You don't need to take any more than 400IU vitamin E per day.

What kind of vitamin E should you take?

 

From the U.S. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/

The FNB's vitamin E recommendations are for alpha-tocopherol alone, the only form maintained in plasma. The FNB based these recommendations primarily on serum levels of the nutrient that provide adequate protection in a test measuring the survival of erythrocytes when exposed to hydrogen peroxide, a free radical [6]. Acknowledging "great uncertainties" in these data, the FNB has called for research to identify other biomarkers for assessing vitamin E requirements....Naturally sourced vitamin E is called d-alpha-tocopherol.

 

....

Supplements of vitamin E typically provide only alpha-tocopherol, although "mixed" products containing other tocopherols and even tocotrienols are available....A given amount of synthetic alpha-tocopherol (listed on labels as "DL" or "dl") [is] only half as active as the same amount (by weight in mg) of the natural form (labeled as "D" or "d"). People need approximately 50% more IU of synthetic alpha tocopherol from dietary supplements and fortified foods to obtain the same amount of the nutrient as from the natural form.

 

From Livestrong http://www.livestrong.com/article/402715-natural-vitamin-e-vs-synthetic/

Natural vitamin E is produced by green plants. Synthetic vitamin E is produced in a laboratory. You might think that the synthetic vitamin E you get from dietary supplements and fortified foods is the same as natural vitamin E. Not exactly. The Office of Dietary Supplements says you need almost twice as much synthetic vitamin E to meet the dietary requirements for natural vitamin E and to protect your health from free radicals.

 

....

Alpha-tocopherol is the only form your body recognizes and uses to meet your daily requirements for vitamin E. Natural vitamin E is listed as international units, or IU, which is the measurement of biological activity. The recommended daily amount, or RDA, is for the natural form of vitamin E. You will find natural vitamin E labeled as d-alpha-tocopherol.

From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocopherol

Synthetic vitamin E derived from petroleum products is .... is always marked on labels simply as dl-tocopherol or dl-tocopheryl acetate, even though it is (if fully written out) actually dl,dl,dl-tocopherol.

Integrative practitioners believe that since d-alpha-tocopherol is accompanied by other tocopherols in nature, a form of vitamin E called mixed tocopherols may have additional health benefits. From Dr. Andrew Weil http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02813/facts-about-vitamin-e

Dr. Weil recommends supplementing with vitamin E that provides a minimum daily dose of 80 mg of the whole complex, including mixed tocopherols and mixed tocotrienols. It should provide at least 10 mg of tocotrienols. If you can't find that, look for a product with mixed natural tocopherols (400 to 800 IU daily). Avoid dl-alpha-tocopherol, the synthetic form.

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btdt

Vitamin E is the only thing suggested by my liver specialist at a dose of 400UI per day. I have fibrosis in my liver and a few cysts.  I was taking this for a few years and then forgot in one of my more forgetful wd times.  I was reminded by him this past spring and have been taking them faithfully again. Not expecting a miracle but if you have a liver problem it may be helpful 

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stone

Can anyone recommend me a good Vitamin E brand please? I take fish oil already so I want to try this. :)

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manymoretodays

Is the dl for delta?

 

And how do iu's and mg.'s line up.  How many iu's in a mg. or viceaversa?  I started some a couple of days ago.  Not sure if I should recommend or not......yet.  Delta fraction tocotrienols.  I always have liked Dr. Andrew Weil.

 

Generally, it is recommended to take vitamin E with fish oil because it helps metabolize the fish oil. Some fish oils come combined with vitamin E.

See http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/36-king-of-supplements-omega-3-fatty-acids-fish-oil/
 

To help fish oil to work, take it with 400IU vitamin E per day. This helps metabolize the fish oil. A good type of vitamin E to take is mixed tocopherols -- they've been shown to have other health benefits. You don't need to take any more than 400IU vitamin E per day.


What kind of vitamin E should you take?

From the U.S. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/

The FNB's vitamin E recommendations are for alpha-tocopherol alone, the only form maintained in plasma. The FNB based these recommendations primarily on serum levels of the nutrient that provide adequate protection in a test measuring the survival of erythrocytes when exposed to hydrogen peroxide, a free radical [6]. Acknowledging "great uncertainties" in these data, the FNB has called for research to identify other biomarkers for assessing vitamin E requirements....Naturally sourced vitamin E is called d-alpha-tocopherol.

....
Supplements of vitamin E typically provide only alpha-tocopherol, although "mixed" products containing other tocopherols and even tocotrienols are available....A given amount of synthetic alpha-tocopherol (listed on labels as "DL" or "dl") [is] only half as active as the same amount (by weight in mg) of the natural form (labeled as "D" or "d"). People need approximately 50% more IU of synthetic alpha tocopherol from dietary supplements and fortified foods to obtain the same amount of the nutrient as from the natural form.

From Livestrong http://www.livestrong.com/article/402715-natural-vitamin-e-vs-synthetic/

Natural vitamin E is produced by green plants. Synthetic vitamin E is produced in a laboratory. You might think that the synthetic vitamin E you get from dietary supplements and fortified foods is the same as natural vitamin E. Not exactly. The Office of Dietary Supplements says you need almost twice as much synthetic vitamin E to meet the dietary requirements for natural vitamin E and to protect your health from free radicals.

....
Alpha-tocopherol is the only form your body recognizes and uses to meet your daily requirements for vitamin E. Natural vitamin E is listed as international units, or IU, which is the measurement of biological activity. The recommended daily amount, or RDA, is for the natural form of vitamin E. You will find natural vitamin E labeled as d-alpha-tocopherol.

From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocopherol

Synthetic vitamin E derived from petroleum products is .... is always marked on labels simply as dl-tocopherol or dl-tocopheryl acetate, even though it is (if fully written out) actually dl,dl,dl-tocopherol.


Integrative practitioners believe that since d-alpha-tocopherol is accompanied by other tocopherols in nature, a form of vitamin E called mixed tocopherols may have additional health benefits. From Dr. Andrew Weil http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02813/facts-about-vitamin-e

Dr. Weil recommends supplementing with vitamin E that provides a minimum daily dose of 80 mg of the whole complex, including mixed tocopherols and mixed tocotrienols. It should provide at least 10 mg of tocotrienols. If you can't find that, look for a product with mixed natural tocopherols (400 to 800 IU daily). Avoid dl-alpha-tocopherol, the synthetic form.

 

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oskcajga

I tried taking 400IU of vitamin E with my fish oil of this brand:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00029F5CM?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00

 

I had a pretty nasty reaction (burning sensations, headaches, difficulty thinking etc) to 400IU, but not when I cut open the capsule and took around 200IU (half).

 

I ended up sending the stuff back though, because it didn't seem to be worth the risk of exacerbating my WD symptoms.

 

Just my own personal experience.

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manymoretodays

Shoot Stone.........they don't really give all the ingredients/exact make up(from what I can see) on the Amazon site?  And do they always do that......."only 2 left!" type of business???

 

I think I will just hold for a bit ..........while I continue to adjust to my final decreases and get some kind of working routine for the winter in order.  And read some more on my "intellectual" days.

 

Ugh, I imagine even the local "more natural food and supplement" places will be all atwitter soon with Christmas buying spree folks.........I so want to head for a cave in Portugal about now.

 

Just jawing.......a bit negative. :blink:

 

Thanks for the input. :)

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stone

Hi Many, there is a bit of a description further down the page

 

"Guard your cells against the damaging effects of free radicals with the natural antioxidant protection of Full Spectrum E with Tocotrienols. Each high-bioavailability softgel supplies 100 IU of vitamin E from d-alpha tocopherol, plus the full spectrum of the other naturally occurring tocopherols, including a high concentration of d-gamma tocopherol, plus the synergistic support of Tocomin Tocotrienol Complex. These close cousins of the tocopherols act as high-powered antioxidants that optimise the free-radical neutralising activity of vitamin E."

 

I have been spending so much on supplements lately,  that I don't want to get these until I am sure I have found the best ones. :)

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Weasel

Any bad reactions to vitamin e?

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Terry4949

Can any one really recommend a good vitamin e supplement to take with my fish oil , I have looked up brands and information , and I am so confused to what to take , some people say don't take if it's made with soy , some say don't take if it's synthetic as it's not good for you , don't want to be spending a fortune on a supplement that is not really doing any good

Edited by scallywag
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Altostrata

Mixed tocopherols. The base (soy, etc.) is up to you.

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Razmuk

Careful with vitamin e while tapering! I started taking vitamin e with my magnesium and fish oil and symptoms started to flare up. Today I decided to look up Vitamin E side effects and on webMD it says that it can induce cyp3a4 and interacts with medications that are metabolized by that enzyme. I am not going to take it anymore and hope that the bad reaction was in fact the Vitamin E which would make sense because my medication is metabolized pretty heavily by cyp3a4. I can not find research to find the extent to which it induces cyp3a4 but considering it is on webMD it at least warrants caution.

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