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Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol or calcitriol)

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JanCarol

Btdt wrote:

 

Take Magnesium and Vitamin D

Together to Avoid Side Effects

Read more: http://www.easy-immu...l#ixzz3ZhbmZRzm

 

I am not sure this is right in my reasoning but I reason if your reacting to Vit D3 and Magnesium and are low in both... it makes complete sense... but my senses are not all there tonight as I am sleep deprived... so I will leave that open for discussion another time. 

 

It is my understanding that if you want to take Vit D, start with the magnesium.  

 

Anytime you have a reaction to a tablet, it may be because you are so depleted, that your system goes crazy trying to absorb it.  Once your magnesium levels are better, you might be able to tolerate Vit D better.

 

I credit the Vit D with improving my bloodwork  http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/5234-jancarol-reboxetine-first-then-lithium/page-18#entry189171  It improves the uptake of B vitamins (doc has told me to decrease B vitamins now), improves calcium and magnesium, improves cardio functions - in my case blood volume and red cell counts.  Vitamin D was the main variable that would affect all of those categories.

 

I've had a thought - Holick talks about improving skin conditions by putting Vitamin D in your lotion.  Eczema, psoriasis, etc.  Additionally, nearly the whole body has ways to manufacture and utilize Vit D.  Especially the skin.

 

For those who are sensitive to Vit D, I wonder about putting it on the skin?  I've started using it on problem spots, it seems to help (but not quite the miracle that Holick noted - Holick also noted that "prescription Vit D creams are NOT STRONG ENOUGH" for the effect he documented)  I think I will use it topically for problems, and see.

 

I get my levels results in 2 days time - so I can see what my 15,000 / 10,000 iu per day experiment has done.

 

Also - for you northern hemisphere people - anyone living north of Atlanta, GA (the 33rd parallel - ironically has huge occult significance as well) - this is the time when your D starts to drop for hibernation.  Don't want to hibernate?  D is what you need.

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Meimeiquest

There is a line of thinking, one could search Mercola for example, that Vitamin D and the type of Vitamin K from bacteria, not veggies, work together to manage calcium, especially in getting it into your bones and not along your vascular walls. So if you supplement Vitamin D, in their way of thinking, you need a good supply of Vitamin K. They believe this is why some vitamin D studies, on post-menopausal women for example, have not shown a benefit from Vitamin D. You can get this type of Vitamin K from natto, some cheeses, and pastured milk fat or eggs (the animals get it from bacteria in the grass), or supplementation.

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Altostrata

Good point, Meimei. I'm taking a vit K2 complex with vitamin D3 now.

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JanCarol

Okay, at 10,000 I started waking up with a sore jaw from bruxism, I've knocked it back to 5,000 iu.  Dr. Stasha Gominek said that bruxism and headaches can be from too much Vit. D.  Again, I get my blood tests back tomorrow.

 

Just bumped hubby up from 3,000 to 5,000 iu, since he is of the "slip, slop slap" Aussie school of "the sun kills you."  (this is deep Aussie conditioning!) so he actually gets less sun in summer than he does in winter - though he has been joining me for "sun walks," and works in the garden, he wears a hat.

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Altostrata

Yes, I think 10,000IU is too high, good only for a very short time to get started.

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JanCarol

Got my blood tests back, I was at 58 - not quite to the desired 60 goal, and that was at a month of 15,000 iu!

 

I have no thyroid or parathyroids, I am obese, I have mitigating factors.  For a normal human being, 10,000 a day is high.  Additionally, it is summer here - but that is when a good Aussie hibernates in the shade and A/C and indoors.  (we are more active and outdoorsy here in sub-tropical winter)

 

After a month of 15,000, a blood test at under my "goal range" - I'm going back to 10,000.  I have been having a lot more pain in the interim when I stepped back from 10,000 to 5,000.  (and yes, I take K2 as a cofactor for calcium, magnesium, and D)

 

But don't try this at home, kids.   :o  Or, rather:  GET YOUR LEVELS DONE before you figure out what to do.  ^_^

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bananas

Definitely glad to see this topic on here.  I actually came on to post a topic about vitamin D3.  I was just not getting better even though I have been continuously dropping my med.  In fact, I was getting worse.  I have been incapable of functioning.  You have no idea as to the degree it took me down to.  My symptoms were extreme fatigue, joint aches, inability to remember anything or comprehend anything, inability to take care of my house or self, and my depression was out the door.  I finally went to my doctor and told her what was happening.  I just felt it couldn't still be the Effexor as I wasn't having the usual detox symptoms.  She did lab tests and, sure enough, my vitamin D was significantly low.  I have been on supplementation now for about a month and just this week feel as if maybe I am starting to turn the corner, but it did get worse before it got better.  I am so hoping this upturn stays up.  I encourage anyone who is feeling they are not improving to get their vitamin D checked.  It has saved my sanity and now I feel as if there is hope that I will finally climb out of this hole as I drop on my meds.  

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Happy2Heal

I was wondering if anyone has found a relationship between a vit D deficiency and the symptoms of depression

 

and also, if adding vit D3 might help with withdrawal?

I had been taking Vit D3 for some time and ran out, and lately I feel depressed, which has left me wondering if I'm having a "relapse" of the original depression,

which was like, 30  years ago!!
 

OR if  my vit D is low and that's causing the blues.

 

IF my insurance will cover it, and that's a BIG IF, I will be getting my level checked.

 

any thoughts on this?

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Altostrata

Vitamin D is very important for many activities in the body. Please see discussion above.

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scallywag

catnapt - 25(OH)D levels (what's measured to assess vitamin D) decrease with increased distance from the equator, i.e. sun exposure.  If you're in the northern US you're more likely to have low 25(OH)D levels than if you live in southern states. In the Canadian province of Ontario, the provincial health system stopped paying for 25OHD levels about 5 years ago because the vast majority of samples indicated deficiency.

 

There are reputable labs in the US that offer internet-based service: you pay, they send you the instructions and supplies, you take your sample and return it to them. I couldn't use US-based mail/internet labs because I'd have to ship blood products (my sample) across the border. I had to get a lab requisition from an MD or licensed practitioner, naturopath or nurse-practitioner. The fee wasn't excessive --  I think 2 years ago I paid $25. 

 

Information on Testing from the Vitamin D council

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SlowandSteady

I've just received results that I'm deficient in vitamin d and have had ongoing fatigue and various aches. I don't know how long I've been deficient but it's an add-on to the withdrawal process because it's yet another issue to try and fix.

Maybe the past two years of withdrawal and its affects keeping me out of the sun has contributed.

In any case I thought I would share because symptoms of this deficiency are also tangled up with withdrawal symptoms.

So now I'm taking vitamin d supplements and trying to get more sunlight which is now more possible because my nervous system is now able to handle it. I'm also taking magnesium supplements because it helps the vitamin d absorb better and the vitamin d helps magnesium absorb better.

My blood test also had indicators along with my symptoms that I have a magnesium deficiency. One being high platelets.

Edited by KarenB
merged topics

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Area1255

Vitamin D is some good stuff.

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Marsha

Ok, I have read through this entire topic. My d3 is 16. My doctor said to start supplementing. So I tried the bluebonnet brand and started with part of the oil from 400 iu under my tongue in the morning with a meal. I also am taking epsom salt baths. The first day of the d3 I started to get gas, some bloating and loose stools. Today, I had serious gas, bloating, loose stools and no appetite. But no anxiety or anything like that. In fact I felt very calm. I certainly will not continue taking it with this side effect. I will just continue with my sun exposure and sardines. I don't know what else to do. I also read that 98 % of people with hashimotos have low d3. I have been on thyroid meds since the 1990s. Is it possible i have been d3 deficient all along resulting in the prozac being prescribed? Also the diagnosis of SAD? If I can't take the d3 will the sun exposure and sardines work?

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magillrn

Marsha, you said: "I also am taking epsom salt baths. The first day of the d3 I started to get gas, some bloating and loose stools. Today, I had serious gas, bloating, loose stools and no appetite."

 

Your GI symptoms are likely related to an electrolyte shift from the epsom salt baths and not at all related to the D3. Try only changing/adding one thing at a time so you can know for sure if you are having symptoms. Also give each change 2 weeks for your body to adjust. Be especially careful when taking multiple forms of the same vitamin (it is generally NOT a good idea)

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Marsha

Marsha, you said: "I also am taking epsom salt baths. The first day of the d3 I started to get gas, some bloating and loose stools. Today, I had serious gas, bloating, loose stools and no appetite."

Your GI symptoms are likely related to an electrolyte shift from the epsom salt baths and not at all related to the D3. Try only changing/adding one thing at a time so you can know for sure if you are having symptoms. Also give each change 2 weeks for your body to adjust. Be especially careful when taking multiple forms of the same vitamin (it is generally NOT a good idea)

thank you magillrn! So I should continue with the d3 and give it 2 weeks? What about the sun exposure? And the sardines? I really don't want to give up the sun exposure. I have been confined indoors for so many years and I am at last free to be in the sun again. What do you think?

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Marsha

Because of horrendous medical incompetence I now am deficient in many vitamins and minerals. My new integrative md said to start with the d3 and I started with 200-400 iu of the gel cap and squeezed the oil under my tongue. I took it for about 5 days. How do I know if I had a reaction to it? I had increased anxiety and cried the whole time. I need to increase my d3. I thankfully can tolerate the sunshine. I read 15 minutes will provide 20,000 iu d3. Does anyone know I this was a reaction to the d3 or if it is a result of d3 deficiency? I certainly do not want to feel like that again. If this needs to be merged with the other d3 topic I understand. I just need some input. Thank you.

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scallywag

Marsha I did a quick search at the Vitamin D Council website and found this Q&A: I'm deficient and had a reaction after taking D3

 

The person asking the question mentions having panic attacks as a reaction.

 

The reply mentions several conditons that indicate magnesium deficiency that must be supplemented as well, one of them is anxiety.

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icequeen

Hi everyone! 

 

As a former member of the now discontinued site PP, I have been reading this forum for years but haven't joined until now. i have felt that I have nothing to add since I have had, still have, have read about and discussed every AD withdrawal symptom under the sun. I have not recovered and doubt I ever will. Anyway, i have read with interest the vitamin D thread. In all these years that I have suffered from lots of weird withdrawal symptom and what I think is strange adaptions and compllications as a result.

 

i have been unable to tolerate any supplements at all - they have all made things worse. In the hope of finding anything, just anything treatable, I have been running to the doctor a couple of times a year.  The only thing she has found was a slight iron deficiency and now a vitamin D deficiency. I reacted  very badly to the vitamin D tablets. They caused severe confusion and worsening of dizziness and constipation, stomach pain and gas that I already have. . I have normal calcium levels and normal levels of parathyroid hormones. Since quitting the ADs I have been unable to tolerate fatty fish, fish oil and milk. 

 

With this in mind one would think that living in a country with very little sunshine and long, cold winters I would have osteoporosis after all these years without much vitamin D. A bone scan ordered by the doctor showed absolutely no osteoporosis whatsoever. I am post menopausal and no longer use estrogen replacement. So is vitamin D deficiency overdiagnosed? Do people in regions with little sunshine make adaptions absorbing enough calcium wihtout "optimal" levels of vitamin D? Proably. Your thoughts?

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compsports

Hi Icequeen,

 

I don't think vitamin D deficiency is overdiagnosed but you are asking some excellent questions.   In your situation, because you don't have osteoporosis and have a normal calcium level, I wouldn't worry about your vitamin D deficiency.  However, I would monitor things closely just to make sure nothing deteriorates.

 

I can fortunately tolerate vitamin D but like you, seem to be quite sensitive to supplements so I definitely understand your situation.

 

Sorry you feel you won't recover.   I can unfortunately relate.

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scallywag

icequeen, the best form of Vitamin D is D3 (cholecalciferol) and the most absorbable formulation is in gel capsules or an oil-based liquid not tablets. Often the tablets are D2, ergocalciferol, which is less effective and less tolerated than D3. Also D3 is only one of an assortment of vitamins and minerals that support bone health: calcium, magnesium, boron, D3 and K2. In the post just before yours, I posted that D3 intolerance is often an indication of magnesium deficiency.

 

I don't think D deficiency is overdiagnosed. (**personal opinion after reading and my own experience and that of friends and family) The test for it is simple and inexpensive compared to other lab tests. There is fairly good agreement in studies on the optimal ranges for 25-OHD, the active form of vitamin D in our blood.

 

If you're post-menopausal and you're only mildly deficient in D3, you can probably make enough vitamin D from the Nordic sun in the summers. You probably already know that adding or continuing weight-bearing exercise is helpful in preventing osteoporosis.

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icequeen

Scallywag, the tablets I was prescribed was D3 and I had a very bad reaction which I have had to every supplement since quitting the antidepressants. I don't excercise at all because that has been impossible due to the shortness of breath that I got on the third day after quitting. It has been with me ever since and doesn't get much better. The only weightbearing I do is the housework I must do and carrying groceries from the supermarket. Still no osteoporosis. 

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icequeen

I see that many mention that intolerance to vit D can be a sign of magnesium deficiency. Well, strange things happen in our bodies after quitting the pills. When I was diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency with normal calcium and no osteoporosis, my magnesium level was too high so taking magnesium is no option for me. I'd rather like to know how to get the excess out of my body. I have lowered my intake of green vegetables to see if it helps. According to blood tests, there is nothing wrong with my kidney function - at least nothing that shows up in blood. 

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Altostrata

How are you intolerant to vitamin D?

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icequeen

HI Alto! Just one dose gave me awful stomach cramps and more constipation than I already have. It also made the burning in the skin worse. The pain in the eyes got worse and I got like little grains of sand in them. Very painful. I tried a tablet again a week or so later and the same thing happened. 

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VitaminB

Dr. Andrew Saul has a pretty interesting article on Vitamin D issues and goes into dosage controversy detail.

 

http://www.doctoryou...om/dvitamin.htm

 

I love this paragraph from the article as it highlights a catch 22:

 

It is noteworthy that skin cancer may actually be prevented by what many feel causes it: sunshine. (43, 44) Krispin Sullivan, author of Naked at Noon: Understanding Sunlight and Vitamin D, writes: "One of the known protectors of skin cells from pre-cancerous changes is vitamin D. For most Americans the primary source of vitamin D is sunlight. UV-B, the only band of light producing vitamin D, is significantly present only midday during summer months in most of the U.S., the exact time we are advised to avoid sunlight. UV-B is blocked by sunscreen." (45) Over-exposure to sunlight does not cause vitamin D toxicity. Persisting concerns over sun exposure are arguments in favor of its nutritional equivalent: oral vitamin D supplementation.

 

Also,

 

I am not sure about world wide, but in the USA a vitamin D test can be done at this franchise Any Lab Test Now for $125 bucks

 

 

The reason I list the price is for people without insurance. You can get your D3 score from a spectra cell test and get 34 other nutrients levels with it. 

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Altostrata

In the US, insurance will generally cover the 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test (Total 25-OHD), the most accurate way to measure Vitamin D in the body.

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tryingtosurvive

Hi guys. I Am on 2700 IU since one year and it got me out of depression. But still anxious.. my levels have moved alot from 17 to 49 to 285 to 71 and now latest 58..
I don't seem to be helped by sun exposure as level 17 was in the summer as I was living in sunny spain. I was in horrible withdrawal though (prozac since 14 years)
And I am more thinking prozac actually might have messed up the Dvitamin reception as well...
any way... now I don't dare to stop the D vitamin but I wonder if it's healthy in the loo I ng run... also if it could help with higher dosis for anxiety ?

Edited by ChessieCat
changed obscenity

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JanCarol

Vitamin D is the #1 nutrient deficiency in the USA (sorry, don't remember my source on that one, but I'll make up for it)

 

Remember, magnesium deficiency is the #2 nutrient deficiency in the USA (and the #1 mineral deficiency).  Magnesium is required for uptake of many vitamins.

 

Vitamin D deficiency can also contribute to B12 deficiency - Stasha Gominek tested all her patients, a huge percentage were deficient in D, and a section of those were also deficient in B12.  All of the ones deficient in B12 were also deficient in D (though not all those deficient in D were deficient in B12)  So if you are B12 deficient, look to D.

 

Here is what Consumer Labs says about D and Statins:

 

 

Statin drugs and vitamin D

If you use a statin medication for cholesterol lowering, it may very helpful to maintain sufficient blood levels of vitamin D for the following reasons:
 
Statins may work better when vitamin D is adequate:
A 6 month,placebo controlled study in China among people with high cholesterol and treated with statin drugs found that taking 2,000 IU of vitamin D3 tablets
significantly improved cholesterol levels. Approximately half the people in the study began with vitamin D blood levels below 20 ng/mL (i.e., vitamin D deficient)
and about another quarter had levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL. Mean vitamin D blood levels increased by 17.1 ng/mL in the treated group and by 2.4 ng/mL in
the placebo group (due to increased sun exposure because the study ended in June). Compared to the placebo group, which experienced slight improvements
in cholesterol levels, total cholesterol levels in the treated group fell by an additional 22.1 ng/mL, triglycerides fell by 28.2 mg/dL, LDL ("bad") cholesterol fell by
20.2 mg/dL, and HDL ("good") cholesterol increased by 8.2 mg/dL. Improvements were greater when excluding those who began the study with vitamin D
levels of 30 ng/mL or higher (no analysis was reported of just those who had been vitamin D deficient). The researchers noted that these results with vitamin D
may be limited to statin treated patients (Qin, Clin Nutr 2015).
 
Statin related muscle pain less likely with when vitamin D is adequate:
The risk of developing muscle pain (myalgia) and inflammation (myositis) while taking cholesterol lowering
statin drugs appears to be greater when people have lower levels of vitamin D (and keep in mind that severe vitamin D deficiency itself regardless
of statin use can cause bone pain and muscle weakness). A study found that, among statin users, the average vitamin D level among those without myalgia was 34.9 ng/mL, while the average among those with myalgia was 28.4 ng/mL (MichalskaKasiczak,Int J Cardiol 2015).
 
A small study of people who suffered muscle pain while on statins and had generally blood levels of vitamin D averaging 22 to 23 ng/mL evaluated the effects of giving very large weekly doses of vitamin D2, ranging from 50,000 to 100,000 IU, with a goal of boosting vitamin D levels to 50 to 80 ng/mL. The researchers concluded that 88% to 95% of patients were able to tolerate statins without muscle pain at various time points in the study, although these percentages ignore those who had dropped out at earlier points due to renewed muscle pain. Over two years, 44 of the 146 patients (30%) experienced myalgia myositis and stopped statin treatment, and 70% were symptom free. The study was not double blind, lower
doses were not tried, and, likely for ethical reasons, there was no control group (i.e., patients not given vitamin D but restarted on statins) (Khayznikov, N Am J
Med Sci 2015). As noted in Concerns and Cautions, the dosage of vitamin D used in this study is very high and could be associated long term
safety risks.  JC SAYS:  SEE NOTE BELOW
 
However, based on the evidence, it would seem worthwhile to make sure you have adequate vitamin D levels if taking a statin.
 
Statin related decline in exercise performance is blunted when vitamin D is adequate:
 
While statins can lessen improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness that normally occur with exercise as well as reduce the content of mitochondria (i.e., the
07/03/2017 Vitamin D Supplements Review (Including Calcium, Vitamin K, Magnesium) https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/_/Vitamin_D/#statins4/25
"energy powerhouses") in muscle cells, vitamin D adequacy may lessen these negative effects.
 
A study in India among 28 people with type 2 diabetes who were vitamin D deficient (averaging about 10 ng/mL) found that, after 12 weeks of performing moderate aerobic exercise, those given simvastatin (40 mg daily) had an 8.4% decrease in cardiovascular fitness, but if also given vitamin D (60,000 IU weekly — which is a very high dose), the decrease was only 0.6%.
Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content decreased 3.6% with simvastatin but improved 12.1% if vitamin D was also given. Vitamin D alone, without simvastatin, increased cardiovascular fitness and mitochondrial content by 7.1% and 16.7%, respectively (Singla, J Diabetes 2017).
 
More vitamin D is needed to raise blood levels when taking a statin:
A review of clinical trials in which vitamin D was given to people aged 60 and over with low vitamin D levels found that statin users had a 21.4% smaller
increase in vitamin D blood levels than people not using statins (BischoffFerrari,JAGS 2017). It would seem advisable to use a slightly higher than normal
dose of vitamin D if you are taking a statin.

 

NOTE:  Stasha Gominek likes her patients to be between 60-80 ng/ml  (much higher than these studies) for maximum benefit to sleep and headaches.

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Lorin
I looked for information in the forums and found no information here

I think it helps my sleep

Edited by ChessieCat
merged with this existing topic

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pete333

Last spring I was greatly helped by vitamin D at 10,000 i.u. per day. But I found out the hard way I can not tolerate a dose over 2,000 units.

Has anyone found it helpful? 

Found a way to tolerate more than 2,000 iu? 

My problem is, even the amount of magnesium found in a multivitamin makes me sick. But, I vould feel much better on higher doses of vitamin D. 

 

Vitamin D toxicity last year has interfered with my memory, caused hypercalmia, confusion, blurred vision and eventually unconsciousness.  I passed out last September before a friend,  not the doctor with 12 years of school, figured it out. 

 

Any helpful advice for increasing the dose, without getting diarrhea from magnesium,  would be great.

Edited by scallywag
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peng

Not saying this is ideal for everybody, pete333, but I suspect multivitamin made me nauseous.

Several magnesium compounds are known to rumble up stomachs and give loose motions.

I went to Magnesium Malate - which comes from the US - and am fine with it.

 

Ativan is a notorious beast.  In the 1980s I tapered myself of it before having anafranil.  I ended up cutting the tablets into quarters and eighths with a razor blade.

My GP said - "Oh you don't need to do that, just drop from 1mg all at once."  Nothing changes, eh?

 

Meanwhile, in a respected newspaper at that time in the early 80s, reporting on the ativan addictive epidemic, IIRC, Pete Townshend, of the The Who was saying that, in his experience, ativan was more addictive than heroin.

 

By the way, surely you can get enough natural vitamin D in Missouri?  We "elderly" in the, rather cloudy, maritime NW of the UK are advised to take it by our national health service (NHS), but maybe you are young enough and in a sunny enough clime not to have to take it as a supplement.  Just a personal view, of course, I do not know all about you and I am not a doctor.

 

Hope you find something helpful, pete.

 

Best wishes,

peng. 

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Deise

Hi everyone. I am posting this here because I don't know where else I should. 

 

My vitamin D levels are at 12 ng/mL. I will have to supplement but I have some questions. My B12 is also low and my iron levels are extremely low. So I will have to supplement all of these (my nutritionist (vegan - I did the blood tests before going vegan so it has nothing to do with it) said that I would maybe need some IV iron because it is so low - going to my gp on Thursday for her to see the lab results and prescribe supplements accordingly, even thought I don't like my gp at all).

 

My worry is that so many supplement may have an adverse reaction and I am afraid. I am still taking Luvox, currently at 18.75mg, and for some months that I am not experiencing withdrawal effects, or if I am they are very very mild, like the odd onset of panic out of nowhere and some days feeling more "down".

 

I would be really greatful to have some insight from you.

 

Thank you so much.

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scallywag

What other supplements are you taking?  Most people taking psychiatric medications ("anti-depressants," "anti-psychotics", "anti-anxiety" medications, etc.) do best with simple supplements like omega 3 fatty acids and magnesium. Please read:

Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil).

Magnesium, nature's calcium channel blocker.

 

Your nutritionist is probably not informed or educated about issues that arise when someone has been on an "anti-depressant" such as Luvox or when someone is tapering such medications. His/her information may be completely okay for someone who has never taken a psych med or has recovered from taking and discontinuing psych meds, but that information is NOT RELIABLE for people who HAVE TAKEN OR TAPERED/DISCONTINUED OR ARE TAPERING psych meds. Please be very cautious with your nutritionist's recommendations.

 

If you opt to supplement with D3, B12 and/or iron, pick one (1) supplement --  either D3 or B12 or iron. Start with it at a low dose, (D3 < 400 IU, B3 < 100 mg), observe your body's reaction for at least 7 days, 14 -21 is better. Then increase the dose somewhat (< 50%) , and observe your body's reaction again. Repeat until you reach the recommended dose.

 

Once you've reached a supplement dose you can handle and stayed at that dose for about 3 weeks, consider doing the same careful testing and "up-dosing" with one of the other supplements.

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Deise

Hi scallywag, thank you so much for answering!

 

Actually I started last week and took all of them. 

I am taking 100mg of iron everyday in the morning. The D3 is to take once a month (22.400 IU, which corresponds to 800 IU daily) and the B12 is 2000 IU once a week.

 

What I experienced in the first 3 days was way more anxiety and a bit of an empty feeling in my chest, and also waking up short of breath. But, after those 3 days everything was normal again (just the waking up short of breath continued sometimes).

 

Do you think it was the vitamins? My iron levels are really low so I need to take it everyday and I feel fine with it. Maybe it was the B12 or the D3?

Do you advise reducing the B12? To how much per week?

The D3 is hard to reduce as it is just one pill a month...

 

Thank you again <3

 

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Deise
On 02/09/2017 at 1:16 AM, scallywag said:

If you opt to supplement with D3, B12 and/or iron, pick one (1) supplement --  either D3 or B12 or iron. Start with it at a low dose, (D3 < 400 IU, B3 < 100 mg), observe your body's reaction for at least 7 days, 14 -21 is better. Then increase the dose somewhat (< 50%) , and observe your body's reaction again. Repeat until you reach the recommended dose.

The second time I had to take B12 I noticed extreme anxiety in the next 5 to 6 days. So I just suppressed it for now since it is the least urgent of the 3.

 

I seem to be doing fine with the 100mg of iron everyday. 

Next Thursday I have to take the D3 and I am a little afraid I will feel bad :/

 

What should I do? It's just one pill a month...

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