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Study finds antipsychotic add-ons for depression not worth the side effects


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Add this to Jin, 2012 which found atypical antipsychotics not worth the risk for those over 40 -- discussion here http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/3493-study-atypical-antipsychotics-not-worth-the-risks-in-those-over-40/ .

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/257548.php

 

Use Of Adjunctive Antipsychotic Medications In Depression

Article Date: 12 Mar 2013 - 14:00 PDT

 

A study published this week in PLOS Medicine finds that while antipsychotic medications are associated with small-to-moderate improvements in depressive symptoms in adults, there is little evidence for improvement on measures of quality of life and these medications are linked to adverse events such as weight gain and sedation.

 

The results of the study, conducted by Glen Spielmans of Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minnesota and colleagues, have potential implications for the treatment of depression by providing clinicians with a better understanding of the risk-benefit profiles for commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications.

 

The authors reached these conclusions by combining the results from 14 published or unpublished randomized clinical trials (duration 4-12 weeks) comparing an adjunctive antipsychotic medication (aripiprazole, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination [OFC], quetiapine, or risperidone) to placebo in the treatment of depression that had not responded to antidepressant medication alone.

 

The four medications showed statistically significant small or small-to-moderate beneficial effects on depression symptoms. However, on measures of functioning and quality of life, these medications generally produced either no benefit or small benefits. In addition, treatment was linked to several adverse events, such as akathisia, sedation, abnormal metabolic laboratory results, and weight gain. The authors also comment that shortcomings in study design and reporting may have over-emphasized the apparent benefits of treatment and reduced the apparent incidence of adverse events.

 

The authors say: "Taken together, our meta-analysis found evidence of (1) some improvement in clinician-assessed depressive symptoms, (2) little evidence of substantial benefit in overall well-being, and (3) abundant evidence of potential treatment-related harm."

 

....

 

Adjunctive Atypical Antipsychotic Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Depression, Quality of Life, and Safety Outcomes”,

Spielmans GI, Berman MI, Linardatos E, Rosenlicht NZ, Perry A, et al. (2013)

PLoS Med 10(3): e1001403. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001403

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They needed a study to find that out? Sheesh!

 

CS

 

Add this to Jin, 2012 which found atypical antipsychotics not worth the risk for those over 40 -- discussion here http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/3493-study-atypical-antipsychotics-not-worth-the-risks-in-those-over-40/ .

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/257548.php

 

Use Of Adjunctive Antipsychotic Medications In Depression

Article Date: 12 Mar 2013 - 14:00 PDT

 

A study published this week in PLOS Medicine finds that while antipsychotic medications are associated with small-to-moderate improvements in depressive symptoms in adults, there is little evidence for improvement on measures of quality of life and these medications are linked to adverse events such as weight gain and sedation.

 

The results of the study, conducted by Glen Spielmans of Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minnesota and colleagues, have potential implications for the treatment of depression by providing clinicians with a better understanding of the risk-benefit profiles for commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications.

 

The authors reached these conclusions by combining the results from 14 published or unpublished randomized clinical trials (duration 4-12 weeks) comparing an adjunctive antipsychotic medication (aripiprazole, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination [OFC], quetiapine, or risperidone) to placebo in the treatment of depression that had not responded to antidepressant medication alone.

 

The four medications showed statistically significant small or small-to-moderate beneficial effects on depression symptoms. However, on measures of functioning and quality of life, these medications generally produced either no benefit or small benefits. In addition, treatment was linked to several adverse events, such as akathisia, sedation, abnormal metabolic laboratory results, and weight gain. The authors also comment that shortcomings in study design and reporting may have over-emphasized the apparent benefits of treatment and reduced the apparent incidence of adverse events.

 

The authors say: "Taken together, our meta-analysis found evidence of (1) some improvement in clinician-assessed depressive symptoms, (2) little evidence of substantial benefit in overall well-being, and (3) abundant evidence of potential treatment-related harm."

 

....

 

Adjunctive Atypical Antipsychotic Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Depression, Quality of Life, and Safety Outcomes”,

Spielmans GI, Berman MI, Linardatos E, Rosenlicht NZ, Perry A, et al. (2013)

PLoS Med 10(3): e1001403. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001403

 

Drug cocktail 1995 - 2010
Started taper of Adderall, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron, and Doxepin in 2006
Finished taper on June 10, 2010

Temazepam on a PRN basis approximately twice a month - 2014 to 2016

Beginning in 2017 - Consumption increased to about two times per week

April 2017 - Increased to taking it full time for insomnia

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