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Accepting yourself may stop depression


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At least this study connects sadness and depression. Solution: Be less judgmental and more accepting of yourself and your feelings.

 

Study shows brain’s response to sadness can predict relapses into depression

 

University of Toronto May 26, 2011

 

TORONTO, ON – A University of Toronto study shows that when formerly depressed people experience mild states of sadness, their brain’s response can predict if they will become depressed again.

 

“Part of what makes depression such a devastating disease is the high rate of relapse,” says Norman Farb, a PhD psychology student and lead author of the study. “However, the fact that some patients are able to fully maintain their recovery suggests the possibility that different responses to the type of emotional challenges encountered in everyday life could reduce the chance of relapse.”

 

Farb and his team showed 16 formerly depressed patients sad movie clips and tracked their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Sixteen months later, nine of the 16 patients had relapsed into depression. The researchers compared the brain activity of relapsing patients against those who remained healthy and against another group of people who had never been depressed.

 

Faced with sadness, the relapsing patients showed more activity in a frontal region of the brain, known as the medial prefrontal gyrus. These responses were also linked to higher rumination: the tendency to think obsessively about negative events and occurrences. The patients who did not relapse showed more activity in the rear part of the brain, which is responsible for processing visual information and is linked to greater feelings of acceptance and non-judgement of experience.

 

“Despite achieving an apparent recovery from the symptoms of depression, this study suggests that there are important differences in how formerly depressed people respond to emotional challenges that predict future well-being,” says Farb. “For a person with a history of depression, using the frontal brain’s ability to analyze and interpret sadness may actually be an unhealthy reaction that can perpetuate the chronic cycle of depression. These at-risk individuals might be better served by trying to accept and notice their feelings rather than explain and analyze them.”

 

The research was published in Biological Psychiatry.

 

http://media.utoronto.ca/media-releases/arts/study-shows-brains-response-to-sadness-can-predict-relapses-into-depression/

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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This is very interesting!

 

This in partiular stood out to me:

Faced with sadness, the relapsing patients showed more activity in a frontal region of the brain, known as the medial prefrontal gyrus. These responses were also linked to higher rumination: the tendency to think obsessively about negative events and occurrences.

Because Ive read that problems with the prefrontal area are related to anxiety disorders.

 

I tend to analyze and ruminate A LOT. Learning ways of accepting my experiences has always made me feel a lot better. CBT never worked for me for anxiety because it made me analyze things more obsessively.

Off Lexapro since 3rd November 2011.

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Neuroplastic

I tend to analyze and ruminate A LOT. Learning ways of accepting my experiences has always made me feel a lot better. CBT never worked for me for anxiety because it made me analyze things more obsessively.

What you said here may actually help many, Phil. No therapy fits all sizes. Many people accuse themselves of not being able to implement certain techniques, and in dire consequence, their symptoms worsen. The chemically-induced changes in our CNS are what they are - what is needed most is time. At some point we may start exposing ourselves to therapy, but in early WD it is next to impossible-been there; the brain is in a raw survival mode. What helps most is the very realization that what you're going through is WD, and that it will eventually end.

2000-2008 Paxil for a situational depression

2008 - Paxil c/t

Severe protracted WD syndrome ever since; improving

 

 

“The only reason for time is so that everything doesn't happen at once”

Albert Einstein

 

"Add signature to your profile. This way we can help you even better!"

Surviving Antidepressants ;)

 

And, above all, ... keep walking. Just keep walking.

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Altostrata

Acceptance of one's limitations plays a big role in taking care of yourself while recovering from withdrawal syndrome.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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