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Nadia

Supplementing with zinc

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Nadia

I came across this when I was researching GABAa receptors.

 

If you have not already, it is interesting to read the wiki on GABA a receptors. It mentions things that are agonists, antagonists, positive allosteric modulators, and negative allosteric modulators, among other effects.

 

Benzos are positive allosteric modulators. As are kava, niacin, valerian, and theanine... in other words, those substances can have anxiolytic effects, helping calm anxiety and help with insomnia. There are subtypes of GABAa receptors, so they can have different effects on individuals.

 

But watch out! Zinc is a negative allosteric modulator. I was taking zinc for possible help with depression, but it turns out taking too much zinc can increase anxiety. This doesn't mean you should not take any, just watch your intake! I was taking 50mg a day!

 

Effects of Too Much Zinc

Higher levels of zinc do not necessarily reduce anxiety. In fact, too much zinc can have the opposite effect, according to the results of animal research published in the May 11, 2010 edition of "Physiology & Behavior." In this study, rats were given either plain water, zinc in various concentrations or a combination of zinc and copper. Compared to rats given water only, the zinc-only rats showed more anxiety, as measured by their tendency to "freeze" under stress. The zinc-only rats also showed impaired memory on a task requiring them to swim to an underwater platform whose location was rendered invisible by adding powdered milk to the water. In contrast, the rats given both zinc and copper performed as well as the rats given water only. These results do not prove that zinc causes anxiety or memory loss, but they do indicate that a proper balance of zinc and copper is necessary for optimum mental functioning.

 

If you are considering taking zinc to treat anxiety, it is important to realize that it may not help you if your zinc levels are already within normal range. Zinc, like other minerals, is beneficial in proper amounts but toxic in large doses. Unless you are pregnant or nursing, the recommended daily allowance of zinc is 11 mg. You should never take more than 40 mg per day under any circumstances and should always consult your doctor before taking more than the recommended daily allowance of any nutrient.

 

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/455480-zinc-for-general-anxiety-disorder/#ixzz2974nmGlb

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bruno2016

maybe you should get your zinc levels tested. Its is an incredibly important mineral for a number of biochemcial reactions. Mine was very low and once I started supplementing in a special compound, I felt real good. Then withdrawal syndrome hit me :(

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Altostrata

Zinc, it seems, can help gut issues.

 

Gut. 2007 February; 56(2): 168–175.

Published online 2006 June 15. doi: 10.1136/gut.2006.099929

Zinc carnosine, a health food supplement that stabilises small bowel integrity and stimulates gut repair processes

Free full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1856764/

 

Among many other strategies to eliminate heartburn and acid reflux, popular functional medicine doctor Mark Hyman suggests http://drhyman.com/blog/2010/07/17/3-simple-steps-to-eliminate-heartburn-and-acid-reflux/

Try 75 to 150 mg of zinc carnosine twice a day between meals — this has been extensively studied and is used frequently in Japan.

to soothe the gut.

 

(Again, he points out acid blockers such as Nexium and Prevacid cause more problems than they solve.)

 

Have you tried zinc for gut issues? Please post your experiences here.

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dunerbug

I've taken zinc. Mine is a liquid that has a dropper. I would take 1 dropper full. My zinc level showed up a little low on my hair mineral test. I didn't realize it was good for gut health. I didn't notice any real difference while taking it. But then again, I was only taking half the amount my doc. told me to take.

 

My hypersensativity issues scared me into going off all supps. I would really like to add mag back in slowly and try zinc again.

 

I went to the chiropractor yesterday and he used a pain relieving cream on my neck and I swear I was more anxious when I got home......

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alexjuice

I was taking zinc carnosine. I forget if it benefitted me-- I trialed it with others-- but I need to try it again.

 

Good reminder.

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compsports

Don't want to make premature conclusions but taking an extra 15mg of Zinc in addition to my multivitamin helps greatly with memory.   One thing I have noticed is if I am about to do something but get sidetracked, I remember what I was going to do which wasn't previously occurring.

 

I am also taking it due to my upcoming surgery as I understand it is helpful with recovery.  Not forbidden 3 weeks prior to surgery unlike fish oil and herbs. :)

 

CS

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compsports

Great article Rupunzel.  Had no idea that something I bought as a cold remedy had so many benefits.

 

CS

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Altostrata

Zinc is another one of those trace metals that are missing in our modern food.

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alexjuice

I've been taking ZMA which is zinc aspartate plus Mg plus b6 the last several days and sleeping much much better. This is marketed as a body building supplement and I got it in the grocery store. I only take a 1/6 dose but goodness I am dreaming and generally enjoying much improved sleep, almost 10hrs on Sat.

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Altostrata

Zinc may be a cortisol-fighter. (Please note this study is from 1990; I haven't been able to find any other studies saying the same thing.) If you wake up early in the morning from a cortisol spike, it might be helpful to take a bit of zinc.
 
Biol Trace Elem Res. 1990 Jan;24(1):83-9.
Zinc acutely and temporarily inhibits adrenal cortisol secretion in humans. A preliminary report.
Brandão-Neto J1, de Mendonça BB, Shuhama T, Marchini JS, Pimenta WP, Tornero MT.

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1702662

Hypo- and hyperzincemia has been reported to cause alterations in the adrenal secretion. To determine the acute effect of zinc on cortisol levels, we studied 27 normal individuals of both sexes aged 20-27 y after a 12-h fast. The tests were initiated at 7:00 AM when an antecubital vein was punctured and a device for infusion was installed and maintained with physiological saline. Zinc was administered orally at 8:00 AM. Subjects were divided into an experimental group of 13 individuals who received doses of 25, 37.5, and 50 mg of zinc and a control group of 14 individual who received 20 mL of physiological saline. Serial blood samples were collected over a period of 240 min after basal samples (-30 and 0 min). We detected an acute inhibitory effect of zinc on cortisol secretion during 240 min of the study period in the experimental group.
 



 
Zinc also helps regulate blood lipids:
 
Nutr Metab (Lond). 2015 Aug 4;12:26. doi: 10.1186/s12986-015-0023-4. eCollection 2015.
Effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Ranasinghe P1, Wathurapatha WS1, Ishara MH2, Jayawardana R3, Galappatthy P1, Katulanda P4, Constantine GR4.

Abstract and free full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26244049

Zinc is a mineral that plays a vital role in many biological processes and plays an important role in insulin action and carbohydrate metabolism. It may also have a protective role in the prevention of atherogenesis. Numerous studies have evaluated the effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids in humans and have demonstrated varying results. We systematically evaluated the literature and performed a meta-analysis on the effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids. A five staged comprehensive search of the literature was conducted in the following databases; PubMed, Web of Science and SciVerse Scopus for studies published before 31st December 2014. All controlled clinical trial in humans, that included a Zinc supplement intervention, either alone or in combination with other micronutrients and evaluated effects on serum lipids (total cholesterol [TC], triglycerides [TG], LDL cholesterol [LDL-c] and HDL cholesterol [HDL-c]). A meta-analysis of selected studies was performed using RevMan v5.3. The Jaded scale was used to assess the methodological quality of the trials included in the systematic review. A total of 24 studies were included in Meta analysis, which included a total of 33 Zinc interventions, in a total of 14,515 participants in the Zinc intervention or control group. The duration of Zinc supplementation ranged from 1 month to 7.5 years. The dose of elemental Zinc supplemented ranged from 15-240 mg/day. The pooled mean difference for TC between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups from random effects analysis was -10.92 mg/dl (95 % CI: -15.33, -6.52; p < 0.0001, I(2) = 83 %), while for HDL cholesterol it was 2.12 mg/dl (95 % CI: -0.74, 4.98; p = 0.15, I(2) = 83 %). The pooled mean difference for LDL-c between Zinc supplemented and placebo group from random effect analysis was -6.87 mg/dl (95 % CI: -11.16,-2.58; p < 0.001, I(2) = 31) and for TG it was -10.92 mg/dl (95 % CI: -18.56, - 3.28; p < 0.01, I(2) = 69 %). In conclusion, Zinc supplementation has favourable effects on plasma lipid parameters. Zinc supplementation significantly reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Therefore it may have the potential to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis related morbidity and mortality.



 
WARNING: DO NOT OVERDO ZINC SUPPLEMENTATION.
 
Zinc needs to be balanced with copper, another important mineral. Make sure you have adequate copper in your diet -- get a blood test for copper AND zinc -- before taking zinc. You may need to add a copper supplement to a zinc supplement. See

From Dr. Andrew Weil http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02869/zinc.html

Copper can be depleted when taking zinc supplements, so consider taking supplemental copper in a zinc-to-copper ratio of 10 to 1.


Zinc | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

Zinc | University of Maryland Medical Center

More easily absorbed forms of zinc are zinc picolinate, zinc citrate, zinc acetate, zinc glycerate, and zinc monomethionine. If zinc sulfate causes stomach irritation, you can try another form, such as zinc citrate.

 

 
Anyone taking Copper ?
 
Zinc (with copper) is a co-factor in minimizing hypothyroidism:

Thyroid symptoms

Thyroid problems misdiagnosed as psychiatric

Iodine, anyone?

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Happy2Heal

oh geez wish I'd checked here first, I just added zinc  a few days ago as I recall my psychiatrist from years ago saying it would help while taking ADs

 

I got 50mgs too, which is apparently way too much

 

I wonder now if it's the reason I've had diarrhea and increased anxiety the past few days

 

although I've also had some added stress, so hard to say

 

will def stop the zinc and see if things improve

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JanCarol

The cluster of symptoms which gets labeled as "pyroluria," and correlates with depression, anxiety, ADHD, bipolar, and other mood dysfunction - is always treated with zinc.

 

I got diagnosed with "pyroluria," which is probably not a real thing - however, treating it did produce benefits (zinc, B6,  Niacin, EPO).

 

My orthomolecular doctor checks my zinc levels regularly, my former orthomolecular doctor liked me to be just "above range," while the current one likes the ranges that the labs set out.

I also have a little bottle by "Ethical Nutrients" called Zinc Test.  You drink a teaspoon.  If it tastes good, you are zinc deficient.  If it tastes okay, you might need a little zinc.  If it tastes AWFUL, you have enough zinc.  I have used this to adjust my zinc doses in between blood tests.  It's a guideline, not a carved in stone thing.  Here's an American version:  https://www.radiantlifecatalog.com/product/premier-zinc-assay/superfoods-supplements  as found in this excellent article:  https://blog.radiantlifecatalog.com/bid/59012/Are-you-Zinc-Deficient-A-simple-DIY-test-from-Premier-Research-Labs  

 

Another important factor with zinc is that it is the opposite of copper (these two should never be taken together!).  In orthomolecular thinking, excess copper is excess emotion, and in Chinese medicine, excess yin.  By taking zinc, you reduce copper - however - if you take too much zinc you can deplete your copper stores.  

 

Most orthomolecular doctors do not like to add copper when your copper gets too low, but instead, adjust your zinc.  Apparently, it is easier for us to get copper (plant based?) than it is zinc (meat based).  Also, it is dangerous to supplement copper - when I have done so, it has been a tiny fraction of a tablet for just 3 days.  Copper toxicity is not something to be messed with.  It is the position of orthomolecular practitioners that most of our mood disorders are from copper toxicity, which is why they frequently supplement with zinc.

 

This is yet another reason why "multimineral" complexes are not smart.  They often contain both of these counterbalanced minerals - like pushing the accelerator and the brake at the same time - it confuses the system.  (another of these pairings is magnesium and calcium, which the multivitamins and multimineral formulas frequently combine so that they cancel each other out.)

 

So - 

1.  Get blood tests before supplementing with zinc, or if you can find a "ZincTest," you can roughly estimate it yourself.

2.  Keep in mind the zinc / copper balance.  Too much of one means that the other is deficient.

3.  Zinc is important to mood, inflammation, immune function, skin  - but like anything, it is about balance.  More does not equal better.

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lavendertealatte

Is it safe to go by the taste test for zinc and just take that, how much is safe per day?  Or do I need to see a holistic naturopath for this kind of thing?

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FarmGirlWorks

Thanks, @lavendertealatte (god, your handle sounds like it tastes so good). Admittedly, I did not read the article; don't know if I was ever cognitively proficient enough to read medical studies but def not now 🙂 Just wanted to chime in that I try to eat oysters -- either raw or in cans -- every day for the high levels of zinc. I still go through black days/black daze but it does seem to stabilize me when I actually do this. Too skeptical about supplementation right now so am trying to incorporate foods to help. Bananas for potassium, oysters for zinc, and oatmeal/coconut for the CNS. Even if it is a placebo, these foods are not hurting.

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