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Treatment by an osteopath (D.O.) for pain, etc.


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I had a very interesting experience with treatment by an osteopath this week.

 

I hurt my left knee getting off the bus Friday night. It hurt a lot and I thought I might need an X-ray. I went to an osteopath for the first time on Monday. He was a practitioner of the hands-on Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT).

 

This is a very gentle manipulation. It might even be a laying on of hands. He said both my knees were torqued. Along with other corrections, he put his hands under my knees and, after 5 minutes or so, my left knee twitched. He said that was a correction. After another while, my right knee twitched.

 

I don't know exactly what he did, but the pain was very much relieved. My left knee still hurt a bit, he said it would continue to correct over the next week or so. And it has.

 

(With the osteopath's permission, I'm going to a chiropractor next week to get the torque in both knees resolved. Chiropractors use more strenuous methods to get misalignments straightened out.)

 

In the US, the Doctor of Osteopathy degree is considered the same as the M.D. degree. D.O.s can prescribe tests such as X-rays and drugs, as well as OMT. Their techniques include the highly controversial cranial-sacral therapy.

 

There are many D.O.s practicing as general practitioners, pain specialists, and even neurologists.

 

My impression is osteopathy lies between conventional medicine and alternative medicine. (M.D.s tend to be dismissive of osteopathy.)

 

This particular practitioner, who was about 60, seemed to have a mystical or spiritual approach to his treatment. He asked questions about my spiritual well-being as well. And, he understood completely how drugs might have damaged me. His empathy was such a relief. It was a revelatory experience for me.

 

If you are having trouble communicating with your M.D., you might want to go to an osteopath. Their training includes alternative approaches, particularly OMT. If you have neuromuscular pain, you might find OMT to be very helpful. At the very least, you'll find a doctor who is sympathetic to the idea you might have had a bad reaction to drugs and will support your healing without drugs.

 

Anybody else have experience with osteopathy?

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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Yes, my PCP is an osteopath. She used to be in favor of non-drug treatment about fifteen years ago when I first started seeing her, but now she's no different than most M.D.s.  She's the one who prescribed Lipitor, which damaged my arms beyond repair, and caused a severe depression that got me hospitalized and put on a polydrug cocktail.  She also told me how to "taper" off Lexapro, a method that has made me sick for going on two years.

 

The age difference between your doctor and mine may be a factor. Mine is in her late forties-early fifties and has two kids to put through college.  She seems to have become more motivated by money over the years than by a desire to help people.

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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I had a better experience w/ a DO than Jemima. I saw a DO in 2012 when I was searching for help. The DO was helpful in retrospect and was an early positive muscle testing experience for me. I might see a DO in the future as an option if I need a Rx.

 

One other thing about DO's is that they typically accept medical insurance while outthesystem NDs will not. This can make a big difference for OOP cost to patient.

"Well my ship's been split to splinters and it's sinking fast
I'm drowning in the poison, got no future, got no past
But my heart is not weary, it's light and it's free
I've got nothing but affection for all those who sailed with me.

Everybody's moving, if they ain't already there
Everybody's got to move somewhere
Stick with me baby, stick with me anyhow
Things should start to get interesting right about now."

- Zimmerman

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It sounds like you found a gem, Alto...a healer of sorts.

 

I've been to a few DOs over the years and they functioned much like MDs with a slightly more Integrative or Holistic paradigm. Not too many do manipulation anymore, from what I understand. In the past, DOs did not have hospital privileges (many years ago).

 

I suspect that the original reason for a doctor choosing osteopathy might be revealing -- if it was because of alignmenf of beliefs or if a default (unable to get into MD program).

 

I'm very glad you found this one!

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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Yes, I do think he was unusual, but I am planning to interview D.O.s for my new primary care physician. My current doctor is too much of a drug believer.

 

There were things about that treatment that were positively eerie, as though it opened up some intuitive senses that had been closed by the trauma of withdrawal.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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Alto,

 

I attended a lecture by Judith Orloff, MD, an intuitive psychiatrist in Los Angeles. She offers courses for physicians to help them tap into intuitive power and connect better with patients. I believe this is a gift and not everyone can be taught, but thought I'd pass along her info in case she might have referrals in your area. I was pleasantly surprised at the insight and interest of some of the physicians in attendance.

 

http://www.drjudithorloff.com/resources-links.htm

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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That's an interesting list. Thank you.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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  • Moderator Emeritus

Alto, I went to a D.O. As PCP for years before we moved, I even took my children to him. I loved him, he had 'magic hands', I called them.

 

Before my disks degenerated, I'd get to a point that I couldn't walk or stand up straight when my back was acting up. He would give me an adjustment and I'd leave feeling like a new person. I wouldn't have headaches for several months.

 

He would start by getting me to lie on my side (in position) then, he'd massage my the back of my neck, I'd instantly relax. It felt so good that each time, I'd tell myself not to relax so fast so I could get more neck massage. I couldn't help it, though, and would ALWAYS instantly relax.

 

He was the most thorough doc I've had as far as tests go and he was quick to admit if he 'didn't know'. He had all kinds of equipment for treatments, as well as, testing equip. such as x-rays, blood work...

 

I sure miss him. He was closed on Thursdays and I cleaned his office in exchange for his fees, if I owed nothing then he'd pay me.

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It sounds like you found a gem, Alto...a healer of sorts. I've been to a few DOs over the years and they functioned much like MDs with a slightly more Integrative or Holistic paradigm. Not too many do manipulation anymore, from what I understand. In the past, DOs did not have hospital privileges (many years ago). I suspect that the original reason for a doctor choosing osteopathy might be revealing -- if it was because of alignmenf of beliefs or if a default (unable to get into MD program). I'm very glad you found this one!

My DO treated a lot of sports injuries, I think he was a huge sports fan.
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I saw an osteopath several years ago when I had really bad neck pain and all the gp did was prescribe

the usual painkillers and referred me to physiotherapy. The waiting list for physio was so long that I saw

the osteopath in desperation. She massaged my neck and shoulders,then pulled on arms and legs .

I can't remember much else except that afterwards I felt amazing, it helped a lot and only needed that 1

session. I had to pay for it myself but was worth every penny. 

 

Then 2 years ago the same thing, my neck again. I couldn't move my head and pain was excruciating.

I was at my daughter's home so went to the osteopath near her. He was very thorough, and did much the

same as the previous one. He said I might not feel the difference right away but would feel better after a

couple of days. I was gutted because I expected to be free of pain there and then. Sure enough, next morning

it was gone!  He explained everything he was doing and why, and told me what my muscles were doing in response

to the manipulation.  He was amazing.

**I am not a medical professional, if in doubt please consult a doctor with withdrawal knowledge.

 

 

Different drugs occasionally (mostly benzos) 1976 - 1981 (no problem)

1993 - 2002 in and out of hospital. every type of drug + ECT. Staring with seroxat

2002  effexor. 

Tapered  March 2012 to March 2013, ending with 5 beads.

Withdrawal April 2013 . Reinstated 5 beads reduced to 4 beads May 2013

Restarted taper  Nov 2013  

OFF EFFEXOR Feb 2015    :D 

Tapered atenolol and omeprazole Dec 2013 - May 2014

 

Tapering tramadol, Feb 2015 100mg , March 2015 50mg  

 July 2017 30mg.  May 15 2018 25mg

Taking fish oil, magnesium, B12, folic acid, bilberry eyebright for eye pressure. 

 

My story http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/4199-hello-mammap-checking-in/page-33

 

Lesson learned, slow down taper at lower doses. Taper no more than 10% of CURRENT dose if possible

 

 

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My knee is so much better today.

 

Sure enough, after I saw the osteopath on Monday, my knee started emitting faint cracking noises every day or so, but I was still hobbling. Last night, a big crack! and today it feels pretty normal.

 

I guess he did start it in the right direction....

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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I don't know why you didn't take the Celebrex for life option :)

1st round Prozac 1989/90, clear depression symptoms. 2nd round Prozac started 1999 when admitted to dr. I was tired. Prozac pooped out, switch to Cymbalta 3/2006. Diagnosed with bipolar disorder due to mania 6/2006--then I was taken abruptly off Cymbalta and didn't know I had SSRI withdrawal. Lots of meds for my intractable "bipolar" symptoms.

Zyprexa started about 9/06, mostly 5mg. Tapered 4/12 through12/29/12

Wellbutrin. XL 300 mg started 1/07, tapered 1/18/13 through 7/8/13

Oxazepam mostly continuously since 6/06, 30mg since 12/12, tapered 1.17.14 through 8.26.15

11/06 Lithium 600mg twice daily, 2.2.14 400mg TID DIY liquid, 2.12.14 1150mg, 3.2.14 1100mg, 3.18.14 1075mg, 4/14 updose to 1100mg, 6.1.14 900 mg capsules 7.8.14 810mg, 8.17.14 725mg, 8.24.24 700mg...10.22.14 487.5mg, 3.9.15 475mg, 4.1.15 462.5mg 4.21.15 450mg 8.11.15 375mg, 11.28.15 362.5mg, back to 375mg four days later, 3.4.16 updose to 475 (too much going on to risk trouble)

9/4/13 Toprol-XL 25mg daily for sudden hypertension, tapered 11.12.13 through 5.3.14, last 10 days or so switched to atenolol

7.4.14 Started Walsh Protocol

56 years old

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Just say yes to drugs!

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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There were things about that treatment that were positively eerie, as though it opened up some intuitive senses that had been closed by the trauma of withdrawal.

I think I've had a similar experience and "positively eerie" is a perfect description.

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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In the US, the Doctor of Osteopathy degree is considered the same as the M.D. degree. D.O.s can prescribe tests such as X-rays and drugs, as well as OMT. Their techniques include the highly controversial cranial-sacral therapy.

I don't know about cranial-sacral therapy, a rare modality I haven't tried. However cranial-sacral therapy has a listing on quackwatch which is typically a positive indicator, really. (I dismiss an alt med modality if quackwatch isn't expending resources to 'debunk' it.)

 

EDIT: Got down to the "O's" to see "Osteopathy" with an entry. ++good.

"Well my ship's been split to splinters and it's sinking fast
I'm drowning in the poison, got no future, got no past
But my heart is not weary, it's light and it's free
I've got nothing but affection for all those who sailed with me.

Everybody's moving, if they ain't already there
Everybody's got to move somewhere
Stick with me baby, stick with me anyhow
Things should start to get interesting right about now."

- Zimmerman

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Cranial-sacral is just one osteopathic technique, and I think it might be pretty minor. Others have borrowed it and made it the centerpiece of therapy.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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I had a chiropractic treatment for my torqued knees last week. It's a miracle! The knee that I was told by a couple of doctors had arthritis -- it would never get better, I'd have to cope with the discomfort -- no longer has that bone-on-bone pain sensation.

 

Both knees are a little tender now, but about 300% better. I'm getting around quite well.

 

I saw the osteopath again yesterday. I asked him if he could take a look at my back. I've had lower back pain for many years. (I had talked to a M.D. friend, a psychiatrist, who told me an osteopath had cured him of many years of back pain in one treatment.)

 

At the osteopath's request, I had brought some old test results, plus x-rays of my back from 7 years ago, and a paper about a heart arrhythmia problem I've been dealing with recently.

 

We spent quite a while talking at first. He said he could tell by the way I used my eyes I was spending a lot of time at the computer.  We discussed other activities I could pursue that would give my eyes more exercise than looking straight ahead, build up my body strength and stamina, and take care of my nervous system by spending more time with other humans.

 

The paper I brought him about my type of arrhythmia attributed it to autonomic or vagal activity. He mentioned Stephen Porges and the polyvagal theory (!!!!) From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Porges

 

The Polyvagal Theory introduces a new perspective relating autonomic function to behavior that includes an appreciation of the autonomic nervous system as a "system," the identification of neural circuits involved in the regulation of autonomic state, and an interpretation of autonomic reactivity as adaptive within the context of the phylogeny of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system.[2] The polyvagal perspective explores new questions, paradigms, explanations, and conclusions regarding the role that autonomic function has in the regulation of affective states and social behavior. Foremost, the polyvagal perspective emphasizes the importance of phylogenetic changes in the neural structures regulating the heart and how these phylogenetic shifts provide insights into the adaptive function of both physiology and behavior. The theory emphasizes the phylogenetic emergence of two vagal systems: a potentially lethal ancient circuit involved in defensive strategies of immobilization (e.g., fainting, dissociative states) and a newer mammalian circuit linking the heart to the face that is involved in both social engagement behaviors and in dampening reactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and the Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

 

The Polyvagal Theory provides a new conceptualization of the autonomic nervous system that emphasizes how an understanding of neurophysiological mechanisms and phylogenetic shifts in the neural regulation of the heart leads to insights into causes and treatments of mental and physical illness.[3] The Polyvagal Theory provides a plausible explanation of several features that are compromised during stress and observed in several psychiatric disorders.

 

He emphasized the importance of face-to-face contact -- literally, our nervous systems are soothed by looking at friendly faces.

 

He said he treats the whole person and again started the very gentle laying-on of hands. He said he was starting a healing process that would take 3-6 months all together.

 

He said he could tell that I'd had a serious injury on my left side, which has caused everything to be pushed over from the left, possibly crowding my lungs, stomach, and vagus nerve. I couldn't recall anything, then remembered perhaps 25 years ago, my apartment building caught on fire and a bunch of us had to jump from a first-floor fire escape to a mattress on the ground. One woman broke her ankle.

 

I recall a jolt to very possibly my left leg, but I walked away from this. I think this may have affected my back etc. every since. I've also had the sensation of poking into my stomach from the left.

 

And of course, my heart is on the left side of my chest. Irritation of the pulmonary arteries leading to the heart is a known factor in arrhythmia.

 

He said was opening up my left side to relieve this crowding. He spent about an hour doing this. As he worked, the nasal congestion I've had for months cleared up.

 

Then he went to work on my autonomic nervous system. For starters, he said he'd never seen an occipital joint that was immobile as my left one was (this is the joint behind the jaw connecting to the cervical vertabrae). (As I look it up, I see it's involved in tension headaches.) He said a branch of the vagus nerve goes through this area. He gave that some attention.

 

Then he did some more craniosacral work, gently cradling my head in various positions. (Dr. Weil on craniosacral therapy here http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03223/Cranial-Osteopathy-Craniosacral-Therapy.html

 

He said that it was obvious to him how my autonomic nervous system was uncoordinated, unlike some of his patients who have autonomic problems that he could not define. He said there was a blockage in my cervical spine, and he was connecting the autonomic signals to the rest of my body, particularly the vagus nerve.

 

He said he does this work with newborn babies, too.

 

It was a very long session, a couple of hours. I felt fine when I went out in the cold to catch the bus. I slept better last night than I have in nearly a year.

 

Practitioners certified by the Osteopathic Cranial Academy http://www.cranialacademy.org/search.html?Submit=Accept

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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WOW!!!! I've never heard of that, but have had vasovagal, occipital and jaw problems from a young age.

 

I'm very excited for you!

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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That's amazing! I'm glad it's working for you Alto   :)

**I am not a medical professional, if in doubt please consult a doctor with withdrawal knowledge.

 

 

Different drugs occasionally (mostly benzos) 1976 - 1981 (no problem)

1993 - 2002 in and out of hospital. every type of drug + ECT. Staring with seroxat

2002  effexor. 

Tapered  March 2012 to March 2013, ending with 5 beads.

Withdrawal April 2013 . Reinstated 5 beads reduced to 4 beads May 2013

Restarted taper  Nov 2013  

OFF EFFEXOR Feb 2015    :D 

Tapered atenolol and omeprazole Dec 2013 - May 2014

 

Tapering tramadol, Feb 2015 100mg , March 2015 50mg  

 July 2017 30mg.  May 15 2018 25mg

Taking fish oil, magnesium, B12, folic acid, bilberry eyebright for eye pressure. 

 

My story http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/4199-hello-mammap-checking-in/page-33

 

Lesson learned, slow down taper at lower doses. Taper no more than 10% of CURRENT dose if possible

 

 

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Thanks. Forgot to mention two other things he told me:

  • Withdrawal syndrome tends to find pre-existing weaknesses in the body and make them worse. (We see this all the time!)
  • Just paying attention to the breath -- not trying to breath in any particular way -- helps unify autonomic and body functioning.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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As soon as Medicare takes effect for me on January 1, I'm ditching the current jerk I have as a PCP and try to hire the D.O. That was mom's PCP before she died. I've been treated by DO most of my life (I'd be dead by now if it weren't for a D.O. That treated my for lumbar pneumonia at 6 months of age. That was the point I was trying to make when I first signed up on this list. An MD will only treat symptoms, A DO will treat the symptoms and look at the underlying cause for the condition. At least with the DO's I've dealt with in the past, they'll take the time to explain to you what's going on and discuss the options for treatment.

History:

1995--Prozac--Quit CT by GP

1995--Effexor--Quit per my GP

1996--Amitriphene--Quit CT when changed GP

2005--Citalopram and BusPar. Prescribed when I decompensated in my GP's office. GP referred me to behavior health. Psychiatrist prescibed these drugs. Taken off citalopram in 2011 due to FDA warning. Quit Buspar during transition to viibryd.

Viibryd--2011 to present. Had a severe reaction in March 2012. Advised both GP and Psychiatrist I was trying to get off these drugs.

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Hi Alto,

Thank you, this is very interesting . I am delighted that have found releif with this doctor ..:)

Alto, are you on medication for the Arrhythmia? If this is considered a personal question, please forgive me ..

I am asking because I was diagnosed with premature beats, associated with SSRI WD, which is a form of arrythmia, but am not on medication.

Wishing you healing blessings always,

Lexicon

Hello,
I am tapering Lorazepam, and my daily dose is 1.125 mgs.

I followed a long hold for 5 months, ( Nov-March 2019) hoping to find some stability, 

but it did not work. So I resumed my taper and hold pattern.
For the last 3 years, I have been using a daily microtaper, cutting .001mgs per day, with holds as needed.
Symptoms are head pressure, labored breathing, palpitations, abrupt surges of dizziness, this being my worst symptom for now, internal tremors, my latest nemesis, unsteadiness, anxiety, plus many other symptoms that cycle in, and cycle out consistently. Not a day passes, without grief :(

I take no other meds.

January 2013 - 15 day quick taper off 10 mgs of Lexapro, and 25 mgs of Sertraline,

at a detox clinic.

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No, I can't tolerate any medication for arrhythmia. I had a cardiac procedure in June which resolved the issue, my doctor expects. I was on an anticoagulant for a while but now I'm just taking an aspirin a day.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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How wonderful to find a doctor who cares that much and took so much time with you! He must have his own private practice. It seems like all the doctors in this area are under the umbrella of some big hospital and are limited as to how much time they can spend with a person, generally no more than fifteen minutes.

Psychotropic drug history: Pristiq 50 mg. (mid-September 2010 through February 2011), Remeron (mid-September 2010 through January 2011), Lexapro 10 mg. (mid-February 2011 through mid-December 2011), Lorazepam (Ativan) 1 mg. as needed mid-September 2010 through early March 2012

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


Introduction: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1588-introducing-jemima/

 

Success Story: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6263-success-jemima-survives-lexapro-and-dr-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 

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I've asked around and it seems that there are several D.O.s who are practicing this way, some connected to physical therapy departments and accepting Medicare, etc.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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  • 1 year later...
  • Administrator

I changed my primary care physician from a rather famous internist M.D. to a D.O. about a year ago. I'm very pleased with my new D.O. PCP, he really listens to me and cares about me.

 

He doesn't have time to do manual therapy, unfortunately, but he's very good about dealing with my aches and pains -- he can feel if a joint is out of alignment and has prescribed physical therapy for me (which is going well).

 

If you have body symptoms such as tight muscles, aches, twitches, or pain, I recommend finding a D.O. who offers manual therapy.

  • Osteopathic training is based in understanding bone structure, musculature, and nerves first.
  • Osteopathic training is a more integrative approach than the training for Medical Doctor (M.D.) degrees, yet D.O.s have all the rights and authority of M.D.s.
  • Most osteopaths (D.O.s) practice medicine like M.D.s, but some still do the fundamental manual manipulation. In my experience, manual manipulation is very gentle. They hardly touch you. I found the results quite remarkable.
  • Some D.O.s go into neurology, orthopedics, and physical therapy. To find a D.O. who practices manual therapy, go to Find a DO - American Osteopathic Association , click on the Specialty heading to sort, look for osteo manipulative therapy, OMM, OMT etc.

There may be other D.O.s in your area who are not on the American Osteopathic Association list.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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