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Ten Myths about Depression and Psycho-Pharmacology http://wp.me/p5nnb-amV

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GiaK

Ten Myths about Depression and Psycho-Pharmacology

myths.gif?w=150&h=111

From David Healy MDs article: Psychiatry Gone Astray

 

Ten Myths about Depression and Psycho-Pharmacology:

 

Myth 1: Your disease is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain

 

Myth 2: It’s no problem to stop treatment with antidepressants

 

Myth 3: Psychotropic Drugs for Mental Illness are like Insulin for Diabetes

 

Myth 4: Psychotropic drugs reduce the number of chronically ill patients

 

Myth 5: Happy pills do not cause suicide in children and adolescents

 

Myth 6: Happy pills have no side effects

 

Myth 7: Happy pills are not addictive

 

Myth 8: The prevalence of depression has increased a lot

 

Myth 9: The main problem is not overtreatment, but undertreatment

 

Myth 10: Antipsychotics prevent brain damage

 

Read the explanation of each myth at David Healy MDs website: Psychiatry Gone Astray

 

More info from Beyond Meds: Chemical imbalance myth and biopsychiatry links – has a collection of links that speak particularly to the idea that mental illness is NOT best explained via a chemical imbalance in the brain

 

and

 

original post http://wp.me/p5nnb-amV

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Altostrata

Excellent! Everyone should read this.

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compsports

This would be good to have on hand in case you run into a "regular" doctor or psychiatrist who wants to prescribe you an antidepressant "yesterday."  Just like some people need to have a medic alert bracelet, folks like us need to have this on hand.

 

CS

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btdt

This would be good to have on hand in case you run into a "regular" doctor or psychiatrist who wants to prescribe you an antidepressant "yesterday."  Just like some people need to have a medic alert bracelet, folks like us need to have this on hand.

 

CS

 

this actually just happened to me last wk.. it may have been a good idea to have all this on hand ...really they were suggesting I take an Ad for pain control... yet again... it was not they my own doctor would never fall into that pit with me he knows the fire that burns down there it was a poor resident I hope I did not traumatize her ... she left the room then I left the room when I came back she was there with my reg doc... so guess she got her nerve back... she is too in dept not to.. I suppose.  

I must say I was disappointed in myself.. and this one is not idea as it is not dealing with antidepressants for pain control.  She had asked me if being in pain and unable to do even what I could before the accident had affected my mood and/or relationships... I said yes... 

So I guess they are teaching her the magic answer too all of these things pain mood and relationship issues ... antidepressants. 

I have to figure out how to handle this better but it always comes when I need some help ... when I am not thinking well due to trying to keep in mind what I want to say as my memory so sucks.. and upset empties my head... 

 

I am betting folks recover from accidents that disrupt their lives are given antidepressants all the time now.  Heck it happened to me way back in 89/90 just for pain forget the other issues... I know this is happening enough to warrant an good response something science related would be good since we would be giving it to doctors if anyone knows of something like this that already exists please give me a link. 

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Skyler

Ten Myths about Depression and Psycho-Pharmacology

myths.gif?w=150&h=111

From David Healy MDs article: Psychiatry Gone Astray

 

Ten Myths about Depression and Psycho-Pharmacology:

 

Myth 1: Your disease is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain

 

Myth 2: It’s no problem to stop treatment with antidepressants

 

Myth 3: Psychotropic Drugs for Mental Illness are like Insulin for Diabetes

 

Myth 4: Psychotropic drugs reduce the number of chronically ill patients

 

Myth 5: Happy pills do not cause suicide in children and adolescents

 

Myth 6: Happy pills have no side effects

 

Myth 7: Happy pills are not addictive

 

Myth 8: The prevalence of depression has increased a lot

 

Myth 9: The main problem is not overtreatment, but undertreatment

 

Myth 10: Antipsychotics prevent brain damage

 

Read the explanation of each myth at David Healy MDs website: Psychiatry Gone Astray

 

More info from Beyond Meds: Chemical imbalance myth and biopsychiatry links – has a collection of links that speak particularly to the idea that mental illness is NOT best explained via a chemical imbalance in the brain

 

and

 

original post http://wp.me/p5nnb-amV

 

 

Excellent compendium... glad to see all these addressed in one location.

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JS11
On 1/28/2014 at 9:17 AM, GiaK said:

Ten Myths about Depression and Psycho-Pharmacology

myths.gif?w=150&h=111

From David Healy MDs article: Psychiatry Gone Astray

...

original post http://wp.me/p5nnb-amV

Thank you, GiaK, this was very informative.

Edited by scallywag
trimmed quote of first post in thread for readability

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LiferButOK

One thing keeps bothering me.  The antidepressant Effexor did save my life.  Under taught beliefs and subsequent choices, I had worked myself into a corner that was not sustainable.  I was in a corner and too exhausted and fearful to fight out of it.  I felt as if I had sunk to the bottom of a muddy pond and was being buried. I was so low that it was an energetic choice whether to draw my next breath.  The Effexor allowed me to keep going until I was able to find my OWN beliefs, and arrive to circumstances that fit who I am.  I am grateful that Effexor got me through.  If I didn’t take it, I might have succumbed years ago.  So, I think the problem is not the use of antidepressants as life savers, but in the lack of communication of the drawbacks as well as the benefits.  And of course, the non-communication of when and how to get off these powerfully-systemic psych meds.  (This SA.org site is doing such valuable work!).  I am still on Effexor and it is part of me now.  At age 58, is it worth a long period of autonomic dysregulation to get off of it?  😕  I guess when it is time, I will know and have the motivation to do it?  

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GiaK

paradox...it's actually quite simple and totally okay.

 

there is a time and place for almost everything. There is nothing unusual about your experience except perhaps you're willing to admit it in a forum where there are people who might balk at such an admission. 

 

I've always said that people need to do what they need to do and I have always meant it. I took drugs because there were no other options at the time. I knew they were awful. I took drugs so that I wouldn't be permanently institutionalized which is what I was threatened with and they weren't kidding. So they saved my life to in a very ass backward way. Don't feel like you ever have to apologize for your experience. We do what we have to do to survive. No one should ever be made to feel bad about taking psych drugs when the context of their lives demands it.

 

my vision is to create a world where there are resources available that everyone can do the healthiest thing for themselves which, in the world I'm working on creating would be virtually never because we know how to take care of one another and do so. 

 

My suggestion (if you want it) is to stay with your experience and trust it. Do what YOU know is right for you.

 

 

 

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LiferButOK
9 hours ago, GiaK said:

 

My suggestion (if you want it) is to stay with your experience and trust it. Do what YOU know is right for you.

Thank-you, GaiK.

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