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Herbal teas: Camomile, ginger, mint, etc. What helps you?

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Razzle

I probably know the answer to this but I would like the collected wisdom of the members here:

 

The Road Back and several psyce drug treatment programs recommend chamomile and passion flower tea. I saw where passion flower may have MAO properties. Any thoughts of efficacy and safety.

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http://altmedicine.about.com/od/druginteractions/p/chamomile.htm

 

Chamomile - Drug Interactions

 

By Cathy Wong, About.com Guide

 

Updated June 27, 2008

 

About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by our Medical Review Board..............................

 

Aspirin:

 

Aspirin may theoretically interact with chamomile, which contains anticoagulant compounds called coumarins, and increase the risk of bleeding.

 

Platelet Inhibitors:

e.g. Ticlopidine (Ticlid), Clopidogrel (Plavix)

Platelet inhibitors are used to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke and for patients who have had a coronary stent implant. Chamomile contains anticoagulant compounds called coumarins. When combined, they may increase the risk of bleeding.

 

Anticoagulants:

e.g. Warfarin (Coumadin)

Warfarin is derived from coumarin, a compound with anticoagulant properties also found in chamomile. Chamomile tea was found to cause internal bleeding when combined with coumarin.

 

Tricyclic Antidepressants:

e.g. Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), Clomipramine (Anafranil), Imipramine (Tofranil)

Tricyclic antidepressants are metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of tricyclic antidepressants, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Clozapine:

Clozapine (Clozaril, Leponex, Fazacio) is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Clozapine, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Propranolol:

Propranolol (Inderal)is a beta-blocker used to treat high blood pressure. It is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Propranolol, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Theophylline:

Theophylline (e.g. Theo-24, Theolair, Bronkodyl, Slo-bid, Slo-Phyllin, Theobid, Theo-Dur, TheolairSR, Uni-Dur) is a bronchodilator used to help people with lung conditions breathe easier. It is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Theophylline, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Tacrine:

Tacrine (Cognex) helps treat symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease or dementia. It is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Tacrine, increasing the risk of toxicity.

Sources

 

Cupp MJ and Tracy TS. "Cytochrome P450: new nomenclature and clinical implications." American Family Physician. 57.1 (1998):107-16.

 

Ganzera M et al. "Inhibitory effects of the essential oil of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) and its major constituents on human cytochrome P450 enzymes." Life Sciences. 78.8 (2006):856-61.

 

Maliakal PP and Wanwimolruk S. "Effect of herbal teas on hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes in rats." Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 53.10 (2001):1323-9.

_______________________________________________________________________

 

http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8513/31402/346469.html?d=dmtContent

 

Potential Dangers of Chamomile...........................................................

 

 

Allergies

 

 

People should avoid chamomile if they are allergic to plants in the Asteraceae (Compositae) family. Examples include aster, chrysanthemum, mugwort, ragweed and ragwort. Chamomile tea has been reported to cause difficulty breathing, anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction) and allergic skin reactions in some individuals. Chamomile eyewash may cause allergic conjunctivitis (pink eye).

 

 

Side Effects

 

 

Impurities in chamomile products may cause side effects. Studies report that chamomile is usually well tolerated, except in patients with allergic reactions triggering asthma or causing skin rash.

 

Chamomile may cause drowsiness in some individuals. Use caution if you are driving or operating heavy machinery. In theory, chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding.

 

You may need to stop taking chamomile before some types of surgery; discuss this with your health care provider. In large doses, chamomile can cause vomiting. An older, poor-quality study reports slight increases in blood pressure from chamomile, but this is not enough evidence to make a firm conclusion.

 

 

Pregnancy And Breast-Feeding

 

 

In theory, chamomile may act as a uterine stimulant or may cause abortion; it should be avoided during pregnancy. Chamomile is usually not recommended during breast-feeding, because there is not enough research in this area.

 

 

 

 

Interactions

 

Interactions with drugs, supplements and other herbs have not been thoroughly studied. The interactions listed below have been reported in scientific publications. If you are taking prescription drugs, speak with your health care provider or pharmacist before using herbs or dietary supplements.

 

 

Interactions With Drugs

 

 

In theory, chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding when used with anticoagulants or antiplatelet drugs. Examples include warfarin (Coumadin), heparin and clopidogrel (Plavix). Some pain relievers may also increase the risk of bleeding if used with chamomile, such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, Anaprox).

 

Chamomile may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam (Ativan); barbiturates, such as phenobarbital; narcotics, such as codeine; and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.

 

Be aware that many tinctures contain high levels of alcohol and may cause vomiting when taken with metronidazole (Flagyl) or disulfiram (Antabuse). An extract containing Marticaria chamomile, Sideritis euboea, Sideritis clandestine, and Pimpinella anisum was associated with selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) properties against osteoporosis. Theoretically, chamomile may interact with SERM drugs such as raloxifene or tamoxifen, a prescription drug used for cancer.

 

 

Interactions With Herbs And Dietary Supplements

 

 

In theory, chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding when also taken with other products that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Examples include Ginkgo biloba and garlic (Allium sativum). Chamomile may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements, such as valerian. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery. Tinctures contain alcohol and may increase these effects.

 

 

 

 

Dosing

 

 

The doses listed below are based on scientific research, publications or traditional use. Because most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly studied or monitored, safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients even within the same brand. Combination products often contain small amounts of each ingredient and may not be effective. Appropriate dosing should be discussed with a health professional before starting therapy; always read the recommendations on a product's label. The dosing for unproven uses should be approached cautiously, because scientific information is limited in these areas.

 

 

Like other herbal products, chamomile concentration is not standardized. Storage and method of extraction are believed to play an important role on the stability of chamomile constituents............................

 

................................................

 

 

Summary

 

Chamomile is popular as a home remedy for many conditions. Teas and liquid extracts are used as a sleep aid and for anxiety. Ointments and baths are sometimes used to treat rashes, eczema and skin irritation. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend chamomile for any health problem. Even though most people think of chamomile as being a mild plant, there are many reports of allergic reactions in those taking chamomile by mouth or using it on their skin. People taking drugs or herbs should be careful when taking chamomile because there may be a greater chance of bleeding. Chamomile may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by other drugs or herbs. Consult your health care provider immediately if you experience side effects.

 

The information in this monograph was prepared by the professional staff at Natural Standard, based on thorough systematic review of scientific evidence. The material was reviewed by the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School with final editing approved by Natural Standard.

 

 

Resources

 

 

Natural Standard: An organization that produces scientifically based reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) topics

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM): A division of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services dedicated to research

 

 

Selected Scientific Studies: Chamomile

 

 

Natural Standard reviewed more than 150 articles to prepare the professional monograph from which this version was created.

______________________________________________________________

 

 

http://www.suite101.com/content/chamomiles-safety-and-potential-side-effects-a99910

 

Chamomile's Safety and Potential Side Effects

 

Are There Dangers Associated with this Popular Herbal Tea?

Mar 2, 2009

Juniper Russo

 

Chamomile is generally considered to be very safe, both when compared to pharmaceutical medications and when compared to other medicinal herbs.

 

All herbal medicines carry some degree of risk: they are, after all, medicines................

 

 

 

How Chamomile Works

 

Chamomile's mechanism of action is surprisingly well-understood, thanks to numerous peer-reviewed studies regarding its safety and efficacy. The primary, medicinally active oil found in chamomile is bisabolol, a viscous alcohol that has been shown to have anti-anxiety, anti-cancer, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Bisabolol is considered to be very safe, with very few known side effects and no known drug interactions.

 

Couramin, chamomile's other active, medicinal oil, has been known to cause drug interactions and other complications. Couramin has a sweet scent similar to hay, and it gives pungent herbs like vanilla, mullein, and chamomile their characteristic odors. When isolated and consumed alone, couramin is acutely toxic and can cause blood thinning and hemorrhage. However, in the amount found in chamomile tea, this is not an issue unless the patient is taking warfarin or other strong blood-thinning drugs.

 

________________________________________________________

 

http://www.drugs.com/mtm/chamomile.html

 

 

What is the most important information I should know about chamomile?

 

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are taking warfarin (Coumadin) or another blood thinner. You may not be able to take chamomile, or you may require special monitoring during treatment if you are taking a blood thinner.

 

Talk to your doctor before taking or using chamomile if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to ragweed, asters, chrysanthemums, celery, or other plants), or if you take other medicines. Chamomile may not be recommended in some situations.

 

Chamomile has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/or advantages of chamomile may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds. There have been instances where herbal/health supplements have been sold which were contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

 

Who should not take chamomile?

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are taking warfarin (Coumadin) or another blood thinner. You may not be able to take chamomile, or you may require special monitoring during treatment if you are taking a blood thinner.

 

Talk to your doctor before taking chamomile if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to ragweed, asters, chrysanthemums, celery, or other plants), or if you take other medicines or herbal/health supplements. Chamomile may not be recommended in some situations.

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant. It is not known whether chamomile will harm an unborn baby. Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. It is also not known whether chamomile will harm a nursing infant. There is no information available regarding the use of chamomile by children. Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without first talking to the child's doctor.

 

 

How should I take chamomile?

 

The use of chamomile in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous.

 

If you choose to use chamomile, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

 

Standardized extracts, tinctures, and solid formulations of herbal/health supplements may provide a more reliable dose of the product.

 

Chamomile is available in pill and liquid formulations. Other formulations may also be available.

 

Some forms of chamomile are intended for internal (oral) use while others are intended for external (topical) use.

 

Do not take more of this product than is directed. Do not use different formulations (e.g., tablets, topical formulations, teas, tinctures, and others) of chamomile at the same time, unless specifically directed to do so by a health care professional. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose of chamomile.

 

Store chamomile as directed on the package. In general, chamomile should be protected from light and moisture. The Anthemis nobilis form of chamomile should be stored in a well-sealed glass or metal container.

 

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra chamomile to make up the missed dose.

 

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

 

What should I avoid while taking chamomile?

Follow your healthcare provider's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

 

Chamomile side effects

Although uncommon, serious side effects have been reported with the use of chamomile. Stop taking chamomile and seek emergency medical attention or notify your doctor immediately if you experience:

 

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

 

vomiting.

 

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

 

 

What other drugs will affect chamomile?

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are taking

 

warfarin (Coumadin),

 

ardeparin (Normiflo),

 

dalteparin (Fragmin),

 

danaparoid (Orgaran),

 

enoxaparin (Lovenox),

 

heparin, or

 

another blood thinner.

 

You may not be able to take chamomile, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicine listed above.

 

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with chamomile. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or other herbal/health supplements........................

 

..........................................

 

http://altmedicine.about.com/od/druginteractions/p/chamomile.htm

Chamomile - Drug Interactions

By Cathy Wong, About.com Guide

 

Updated June 27, 2008

 

About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by our Medical Review Board.

 

.............................

 

Aspirin:

 

Aspirin may theoretically interact with chamomile, which contains anticoagulant compounds called coumarins, and increase the risk of bleeding.

 

Platelet Inhibitors:

e.g. Ticlopidine (Ticlid), Clopidogrel (Plavix)

Platelet inhibitors are used to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke and for patients who have had a coronary stent implant. Chamomile contains anticoagulant compounds called coumarins. When combined, they may increase the risk of bleeding.

 

Anticoagulants:

e.g. Warfarin (Coumadin)

Warfarin is derived from coumarin, a compound with anticoagulant properties also found in chamomile. Chamomile tea was found to cause internal bleeding when combined with coumarin.

 

Tricyclic Antidepressants:

e.g. Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), Clomipramine (Anafranil), Imipramine (Tofranil)

Tricyclic antidepressants are metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of tricyclic antidepressants, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Clozapine:

Clozapine (Clozaril, Leponex, Fazacio) is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Clozapine, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Propranolol:

Propranolol (Inderal)is a beta-blocker used to treat high blood pressure. It is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Propranolol, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Theophylline:

Theophylline (e.g. Theo-24, Theolair, Bronkodyl, Slo-bid, Slo-Phyllin, Theobid, Theo-Dur, TheolairSR, Uni-Dur) is a bronchodilator used to help people with lung conditions breathe easier. It is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Theophylline, increasing the risk of toxicity.

 

Tacrine:

Tacrine (Cognex) helps treat symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease or dementia. It is metabolized in the body by the enzyme CYP1A2. Chamomile has been found to inhibit CYP1A2 and may theoretically increase blood concentrations of Tacrine, increasing the risk of toxicity.

Sources

 

Cupp MJ and Tracy TS. "Cytochrome P450: new nomenclature and clinical implications." American Family Physician. 57.1 (1998):107-16.

 

Ganzera M et al. "Inhibitory effects of the essential oil of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) and its major constituents on human cytochrome P450 enzymes." Life Sciences. 78.8 (2006):856-61.

 

Maliakal PP and Wanwimolruk S. "Effect of herbal teas on hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes in rats." Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 53.10 (2001):1323-9.

_______________________________________________________________________

 

http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8513/31402/346469.html?d=dmtContent

 

Potential Dangers of Chamomile.....................

......................................

 

Allergies

 

People should avoid chamomile if they are allergic to plants in the Asteraceae (Compositae) family. Examples include aster, chrysanthemum, mugwort, ragweed and ragwort. Chamomile tea has been reported to cause difficulty breathing, anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction) and allergic skin reactions in some individuals. Chamomile eyewash may cause allergic conjunctivitis (pink eye).

 

 

Side Effects

 

Impurities in chamomile products may cause side effects. Studies report that chamomile is usually well tolerated, except in patients with allergic reactions triggering asthma or causing skin rash. Chamomile may cause drowsiness in some individuals. Use caution if you are driving or operating heavy machinery. In theory, chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding. You may need to stop taking chamomile before some types of surgery; discuss this with your health care provider. In large doses, chamomile can cause vomiting. An older, poor-quality study reports slight increases in blood pressure from chamomile, but this is not enough evidence to make a firm conclusion.

 

 

Pregnancy And Breast-Feeding

 

In theory, chamomile may act as a uterine stimulant or may cause abortion; it should be avoided during pregnancy. Chamomile is usually not recommended during breast-feeding, because there is not enough research in this area.

 

 

Interactions

 

Interactions with drugs, supplements and other herbs have not been thoroughly studied. The interactions listed below have been reported in scientific publications. If you are taking prescription drugs, speak with your health care provider or pharmacist before using herbs or dietary supplements.

 

 

Interactions With Drugs

 

 

In theory, chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding when used with anticoagulants or antiplatelet drugs. Examples include warfarin (Coumadin), heparin and clopidogrel (Plavix). Some pain relievers may also increase the risk of bleeding if used with chamomile, such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, Anaprox). Chamomile may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam (Ativan); barbiturates, such as phenobarbital; narcotics, such as codeine; and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery. Be aware that many tinctures contain high levels of alcohol and may cause vomiting when taken with metronidazole (Flagyl) or disulfiram (Antabuse). An extract containing Marticaria chamomile, Sideritis euboea, Sideritis clandestine, and Pimpinella anisum was associated with selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) properties against osteoporosis. Theoretically, chamomile may interact with SERM drugs such as raloxifene or tamoxifen, a prescription drug used for cancer.

 

 

Interactions With Herbs And Dietary Supplements

 

 

In theory, chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding when also taken with other products that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Examples include Ginkgo biloba and garlic (Allium sativum). Chamomile may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements, such as valerian. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery. Tinctures contain alcohol and may increase these effects.

 

 

 

 

Dosing

 

The doses listed below are based on scientific research, publications or traditional use. Because most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly studied or monitored, safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients even within the same brand. Combination products often contain small amounts of each ingredient and may not be effective. Appropriate dosing should be discussed with a health professional before starting therapy; always read the recommendations on a product's label. The dosing for unproven uses should be approached cautiously, because scientific information is limited in these areas.

 

 

Like other herbal products, chamomile concentration is not standardized. Storage and method of extraction are believed to play an important role on the stability of chamomile constituents............................

 

................................................

 

 

Summary

 

Chamomile is popular as a home remedy for many conditions. Teas and liquid extracts are used as a sleep aid and for anxiety. Ointments and baths are sometimes used to treat rashes, eczema and skin irritation. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend chamomile for any health problem. Even though most people think of chamomile as being a mild plant, there are many reports of allergic reactions in those taking chamomile by mouth or using it on their skin. People taking drugs or herbs should be careful when taking chamomile because there may be a greater chance of bleeding. Chamomile may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by other drugs or herbs. Consult your health care provider immediately if you experience side effects.

 

 

The information in this monograph was prepared by the professional staff at Natural Standard, based on thorough systematic review of scientific evidence. The material was reviewed by the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School with final editing approved by Natural Standard.

 

 

 

 

Resources

 

 

Natural Standard: An organization that produces scientifically based reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) topics

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM): A division of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services dedicated to research

 

 

Selected Scientific Studies: Chamomile

 

 

Natural Standard reviewed more than 150 articles to prepare the professional monograph from which this version was created.

__________________________________________________

 

http://www.suite101.com/content/chamomiles-safety-and-potential-side-effects-a99910

 

Chamomile's Safety and Potential Side Effects

Are There Dangers Associated with this Popular Herbal Tea?

 

Mar 2, 2009

Juniper Russo

 

 

Chamomile is generally considered to be very safe, both when compared to pharmaceutical medications and when compared to other medicinal herbs.

 

All herbal medicines carry some degree of risk: they are, after all, medicines................

 

 

 

How Chamomile Works

 

Chamomile's mechanism of action is surprisingly well-understood, thanks to numerous peer-reviewed studies regarding its safety and efficacy. The primary, medicinally active oil found in chamomile is bisabolol, a viscous alcohol that has been shown to have anti-anxiety, anti-cancer, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Bisabolol is considered to be very safe, with very few known side effects and no known drug interactions.

 

Couramin, chamomile's other active, medicinal oil, has been known to cause drug interactions and other complications. Couramin has a sweet scent similar to hay, and it gives pungent herbs like vanilla, mullein, and chamomile their characteristic odors. When isolated and consumed alone, couramin is acutely toxic and can cause blood thinning and hemorrhage. However, in the amount found in chamomile tea, this is not an issue unless the patient is taking warfarin or other strong blood-thinning drugs.

 

_____________________________________________________

 

http://www.drugs.com/mtm/chamomile.html

 

What is the most important information I should know about chamomile?

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are taking warfarin (Coumadin) or another blood thinner. You may not be able to take chamomile, or you may require special monitoring during treatment if you are taking a blood thinner.

 

Talk to your doctor before taking or using chamomile if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to ragweed, asters, chrysanthemums, celery, or other plants), or if you take other medicines. Chamomile may not be recommended in some situations.

 

Chamomile has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/or advantages of chamomile may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds. There have been instances where herbal/health supplements have been sold which were contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

 

Who should not take chamomile?

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are taking warfarin (Coumadin) or another blood thinner. You may not be able to take chamomile, or you may require special monitoring during treatment if you are taking a blood thinner.

 

Talk to your doctor before taking chamomile if you have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to ragweed, asters, chrysanthemums, celery, or other plants), or if you take other medicines or herbal/health supplements. Chamomile may not be recommended in some situations.

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant. It is not known whether chamomile will harm an unborn baby. Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. It is also not known whether chamomile will harm a nursing infant. There is no information available regarding the use of chamomile by children. Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without first talking to the child's doctor.

 

 

How should I take chamomile?

 

The use of chamomile in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable. Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous.

 

If you choose to use chamomile, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

 

Standardized extracts, tinctures, and solid formulations of herbal/health supplements may provide a more reliable dose of the product.

 

Chamomile is available in pill and liquid formulations. Other formulations may also be available.

 

Some forms of chamomile are intended for internal (oral) use while others are intended for external (topical) use.

 

Do not take more of this product than is directed. Do not use different formulations (e.g., tablets, topical formulations, teas, tinctures, and others) of chamomile at the same time, unless specifically directed to do so by a health care professional. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose of chamomile.

 

Store chamomile as directed on the package. In general, chamomile should be protected from light and moisture. The Anthemis nobilis form of chamomile should be stored in a well-sealed glass or metal container.

 

What happens if I miss a dose?

 

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra chamomile to make up the missed dose.

 

What happens if I overdose?

 

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

 

What should I avoid while taking chamomile?

 

Follow your healthcare provider's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

 

Chamomile side effects

 

Although uncommon, serious side effects have been reported with the use of chamomile. Stop taking chamomile and seek emergency medical attention or notify your doctor immediately if you experience:

 

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

 

vomiting.

 

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

 

 

What other drugs will affect chamomile?

 

Do not take chamomile without first talking to your doctor if you are taking

 

warfarin (Coumadin),

 

ardeparin (Normiflo),

 

dalteparin (Fragmin),

 

danaparoid (Orgaran),

 

enoxaparin (Lovenox),

 

heparin, or

 

another blood thinner.

 

You may not be able to take chamomile, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicine listed above.

 

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with chamomile. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or other herbal/health supplements........................

 

..........................................

 

Where can I get more information?

 

Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.

 

 

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

 

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

 

Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.01. Revision Date: 1/10/2011 12:02:24 PM.

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Altostrata

Being hypersensitive, I found I could drink only very weak chamomile tea, or it made me feel weird. Occasionally, I like a cuppa and enjoy it.

 

I pretty much just drink peppermint tea.

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Punarbhava

Hibiscus is a primary ingredient in many herbal teas. I was surprised to find the following information.

__________________________

 

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/hibiscus-tea-side-effects.html

 

Hibiscus Tea Side Effects

 

It is not unlikely to come across hibiscus tea side effects. Almost all kinds of herbal remedies have their own share of side effects. Read more...

 

The hibiscus refers to a genus of plants that comprises of about 220 species. ...... Many herbalist tout for the ability of the hibiscus tea to treat a variety of medical ailments from common cold, swelling, poor appetite, high blood pressure, stomach disorders to upper respiratory tract disorders.

 

However, behind all such benefits of drinking this tea, there are a number of side effects too, which may not be so pleasant. Know what these hibiscus tea side effects are from what follows.

 

Side Effects of Hibiscus Tea

 

The hibiscus tea side effects do not occur for everyone who consumes it. There are certain conditions which when met, give rise to the occurrence of the side effects.

 

For instance, as the tea is well-known for its blood-pressure lowering quality, it should not be taken by people with hypotension (low blood pressure). According to a study conducted by a medical research center, people who frequently drink this herbal tea, experience a reduction of 7.2 points in their systolic blood pressure.

 

So this implies that people with low blood pressure must not consume this tea lest, there may occur severe complications such as faintness, dizziness, weakness, or in some cases, damage to the heart or brain.

 

 

One of the common hibiscus tea side effects may be an effect that may be similar to experiencing hallucinations. Which is why, people who are consuming the tea for the first time, are advised not to go for driving or any other activity, wherein sleepiness may be dangerous.

 

The chemicals in the hibiscus plant affect the estrogen levels, especially in women. So one of the hibiscus tea problems is hormonal changes in the body. This may particularly affect people who had undergone hormone replacement therapy, or women who are using birth control pills.

 

 

It is not sure whether drinking hibiscus tea risks the health of the unborn child during pregnancy. So it is advisable for expecting mothers to avoid its use

 

Certain chemicals in the plant are known to attack cancer cells that affect the skin and the brain . So, people who are already on drugs for treating cancer, must not consume the hibiscus tea. Otherwise, hibiscus tea side effects may occur in the form of an additive effect on the treatment, and worsen the condition.

 

Other hibiscus flower tea side effects may flare up when the tea is taken in conjunction with inflammatory drugs.

 

Having dealt with the basic and common hibiscus tea side effects, here is a short description on the benefits of this herbal tea.

 

Hibiscus Tea Benefits

 

One of the most important hibiscus tea benefit is its antioxidant nature. It helps in neutralizing the effect of free radicals in the body.

 

Drinking hibiscus tea as a regular part of the diet, boosts the immune system, helps in cell development, and reduces risks of cancer and cataracts.

 

As mentioned already, this herbal tea helps in lowering elevated blood pressure level, and treats liver disorders. Since the tea reduces high cholesterol, it is beneficial for reducing the risk of developing heart diseases.

 

Being a natural antispasmodic, the tea made from the hibiscus flowers relieves muscle spasm, menstrual cramps and even abdominal cramps.

 

Taking the tea after meal, stimulates metabolism thus, helps in breaking down the starch and sugar. This eventually aids in losing weight.

 

As the tea is rich in vitamin C, it helps the body to have a speedy recovery from illnesses such as cold and flu.

 

There aren't may hibiscus tea side effects, which may seem to bother many people, as you can infer from the above data. And looking at so many benefits of the herbal tea, the side effects may be considered negligible or of less importance.

___________________________________________________________________________

 

 

http://www.healthline.com/natstandardcontent/hibiscus/3?brand=

 

 

Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.)

 

Category

Herbs & Supplements

 

 

Synonyms

 

Ambary plant (Hibiscus cannabinus), burao (Hibiscus tiliaceus), chemparathampoo, erragogu, esculetin, gogu (Hibiscus cannabinus), Hibiscus protocatechuic acid (PCA), Hibiscus mutabilis, Hibiscus rosasinensis, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Hibiscus syriacus, Hibiscus taiwanensis, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Jamaican red sorrel, Karkadi, karkada, karkade (Arabic), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), Malvaceae (family), red sorrel (English), roselle (English), sour tea, tellagogu, zobo drink.

 

Note: This monograph does not include okra (Abelmoschus esculentus, formerly classified as Hibiscus esculentus) or Norfolk Island hibiscus (Lagunaria patersonii).

 

 

Background

 

The Hibiscus genus contains several species, many of which have been used medicinally. ......Hibiscus sabdariffa and compounds isolated from it (for example, anthocyanins and hibiscus protocatechuic acid) are likely candidates for future studies. There is limited reported safety data about hibiscus, although it is popularly used as a tea........

 

 

Evidence

 

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

 

Hypertension (high blood pressure): Extracts of hibiscus may lower the systolic and diastolic pressure. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results, although the use of hibiscus for lowering blood pressure looks promising.

Grade: B

 

 

Lice: Currently, there is limited available evidence evaluating the effects of hibiscus for the treatment of lice. Additional study is warranted in this area.

Grade: C

 

 

 

Tradition

 

 

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven.

 

Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

 

 

Antibacterial (melioidosis), antifungal, antioxidant, antipyretic (fever reducer), antiviral, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), cancer, contraceptive, flavoring agent, hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol), leukemia, liver diseases, liver protection, pain (antinociceptive), renal stone disease, weight loss.

 

 

To learn more about dosing, please visit the web site listed above.

 

 

Safety

 

 

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

 

 

Allergies

 

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to hibiscus, its constituents, or members of the Malvaceae family. Reported allergy symptoms include skin rash and hives.

 

 

Side Effects and Warnings

 

There is limited reported safety data about hibiscus, although it is popularly used as a tea.

 

Although not well studied in humans, excessive doses of hibiscus for relatively long periods may have antifertility effects. One study found that hibiscus tea contained polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs have been associated with birth defects and cancer . The sources of PAHs in food are predominantly from environmental pollution and food processing. Use cautiously in patients with hypertension or hypotension (high or low blood pressure), as hibiscus may lower blood pressure.

 

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

 

Hibiscus is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. However, Hibiscus tiliaceus has been used throughout the Vanuatu archipelago to speed childbirth. In theory, excessive doses of hibiscus for relatively long periods may have antifertility activity, and caution is advised.

 

 

Interactions

 

Interactions with Drugs

 

Although not well studied in humans, hibiscus may have anticancer effects. Thus, caution is advised when taking hibiscus with other anticancer agents

.

 

Extracts of hibiscus may lower the systolic and diastolic pressure. Patients taking blood pressure lowering agents should use hibiscus cautiously due to additive effects. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

 

 

Zobo drink (made from hibiscus) may change the way certain anti-inflammatory agents, such as acetaminophen, are processed in the body. Caution is advised when taking anti-inflammatory agents and hibiscus within a two-hour period of one another.

 

Karkadi beverage (Hibiscus sabdarifa) may reduce antimalarial (quinine, chloroquine) efficacy.

 

Antiviral effects have been observed in preliminary laboratory study. In theory, hibiscus taken with other antiviral agents may have additive effects.

 

 

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis may have estrogenic activity, although the clinical significance is unclear. Use hibiscus cautiously in patients taking hormone altering agents, such as hormone replacement therapy or birth control pills.

 

 

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

 

Although not well studied in humans, hibiscus may have anticancer effects. Thus, caution is advised when taking hibiscus with other anticancer agents.

 

Extracts of hibiscus may lower the systolic and diastolic pressure. Patients taking herbs that lower blood pressure should use hibiscus cautiously due to additive effects. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

 

In theory, Karkadi beverage (Hibiscus sabdarifa) may reduce the efficacy of antimalarial herbs and supplements.

 

Antiviral effects have been observed in preliminary laboratory study. In theory, hibiscus taken with other herbs with antiviral activity may have additive effects.

 

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis may have estrogenic activity, although the clinical significance is unclear. Use hibiscus cautiously in patients taking hormone altering herbs or supplements.

 

 

Attribution

 

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): J. Kathryn Bryan, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

 

Bibliography

DISCLAIMER: Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com

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Patience

I had some hibiscus tea in a cafe several months ago. I woke up the next morning feeling like I had a hangover, like I'd been drugged the night before. Mint is the only herbal tea I feel safe drinking.

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Altostrata

Same with me. I've tried tea containing hibiscus and it made me feel weird, as most herbal teas do, including rooibos. (Pre-withdrawal, I used to love to drink all kinds of teas.)

 

Now I only drink peppermint or very dilute chamomile.

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Punarbhava

Count me in as well. Not only did I feel strange but also very incredibly sick. At the time, I figured it was the hibicus in the flavored teas but I was too sick to do any research.

 

Anyway, I decided to conduct a inter-net search the other day and thus, posted some info.

 

Gosh, we can be so sensitive to so many things during WD.

 

I can't even drink any of the mint teas nor ginger teas. They make me feel very nauseous. It's like I get a paradoxical reaction to the teas that are suppose to be good for nausea.

 

 

Consequently, I have a mug of plain boiled water if I crave something hot. :(

 

 

Pun

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alexjuice

I am feeling loopy and very calm. I have homework to do but it is far from my mind.

 

I am very sensitive to many 'normal' foodstuffs. Some months ago I made ginger tea with fresh ginger. It was very calming. Too calming; I could never finish a mug.

 

Today, I tried a bit of ginger tea for first time since the spring.

 

I made a weak tea and only drank half of a coffee cup's worth. I am now experiencing 'mellowness' and assorted other things. Stomach is churning.

 

I went to the wikipage on giner. Which includes this bit with a link to an abstract:

 

Preliminary research also indicates that nine compounds found in ginger may bind to human serotonin receptors, possibly helping to affect anxiety.

Identification of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonists in ginger. Nievergelt A. Huonker P. Schoop R. Altmann KH. Gertsch J. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry. 18(9):3345-51, 2010 May 1

 

I'm confused. I'd been having a bad day with anxiety and am feeling relief about that. But upset that I am so sensitive to so much. As an ex-drug addict, it's very weird feeling somewhat 'inebriated' which is how I feel right now... and I don't like it. I could get really messed up, maybe even end up in the hospital, just taking certain supplements and fresh foods. If I made this tea with 10x more ginger and drank the whole glass... who knows what'd happen. But, goodness, it's only ginger! Yet, at the same, I'm very happy to have this relief.

 

Anyway, if ginger affects some of the 5-HT receptors, should I not take it... for that reason alone? Doesn't my body need to find its own way? Then again, I'm taking a crapload of benzos, so I'm no snowflake in this deal.

 

God didn't give humans ginger to consume AND brains of egg salad. Still I find myself on this ginger-filled earth with an egg salad-filled cranium.

 

Any advice?

 

Alex

 

ps - Also, do homework or lie down on couch? Anyone care to predict Alex's course of action in the near term?

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brighteningup

Can't comment on the ginger, accept to offer my sympathies for how sensitive your system is and hope you have improvements soon.

 

Can comment on doing the homework versus lying on the couch...

 

I'm trying to finish a PhD - I've reached the dreaded writing up stage and I could give you much advice on how to procrastinate, but don't think that would help though...:)...I still do much soul searching on why I procrastinate...it doesn't always get me very far (generally I think I know the answers - but this doens't seem to stop me doing it). My withdrawal / side effect symptons from the SSRI (and my skin condition) have both been a genuine reason why I haven't felt like working some of the time - and also sometimes an excuse.

 

My suggestion as far as the do the homework or lie on the couch is try doing the homework for a set really small amount of time 5 minutes, 10 minutes you choose.

 

You might find you get into it and go on for longer, fantastic - keep going for a bit; although it's probably good to set yourself some kind of timer so you don't work more than 30-45 minutes before you take a break. (Having not been able to get into work, I sometimes finally manage to get started, get into a flow, forget to stop and than suddenly realise I'm shatttered. I get a sense of achievement of having done something, but also I am suddenly too worn to do anymore - I don't recommend this either).

 

If you're getting no where after 5 to 10 minutes, then lie on the couch for a bit and then see if after a while you're ready to start again, or if you want to leave it for now and do something else.

 

Can't promise this will work for you. It doesn't always for me, but I've used this quite a bit to help me get down to work. I find committing myself to just 5 minutes work is a lot easier than committing to work for an hour and can often be enough to get me going.

 

All best,

 

Bright.

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Altostrata

Great advice, bright.

 

alex, please don't worry about ginger tea acting on serotonin receptors. It may or it may not, or, as is very common with herbal preparations, it may act on a bunch of things that haven't been identified.

 

If it helps you, it helps -- and that's good!

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alexjuice

Thanks for the help, guys.

 

It seems, if anything, my hypersensitive system is becoming more sensitive... though who knows?

 

I need to solve my reflux problems, my voice is all over the map. So frustrating.

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InNeedOfHope

While my brain is actually working I thought I would make a few posts. I am highly sensitive to food, vitamins medicines herbs generally, but one thing I used to be able to tolerate that helped was Passionflower. I have had it in capsule form and with Skullcap in a tea. I tried Cammomile it just made me feel sick. I could use it for a little while, then it would lose its effectiveness and I would have a break and save it for the worst moments. It made my muscles relax and I could sleep, but had no after effects.

 

I stopped using it only because I seemed to react to thing like probiotics and more and more foods, so I suppose I got scared of trying it again after a break. I have to say I took this from day one of withdrawal, so I don't know if that is one reason I could tolerate it.

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alexjuice

Trouble. Herb teas gave me mostly trouble. I can't say I tried passionflower, however.

 

Others may report better experiences. Chamomile tea didn't cause a negative reaction, nor did it help with much.

 

Ginger tea, made from fresh ground ginger, is very calming and considered good for the gut. Even that one causes more sedation ( borderline intoxication) than I am comfortable with. But I may try it again in the future.

 

It depends, IMO, on the severity of your oversensitivities. I tend to experience hypersensitivity as maybe the most potent w/d symptom. That is, even 1/100th of a food or supp that I tolerated well a few years ago, presents serious setback risk. I experienced enough lousy responses to teas that I just cut all of them.

 

As I said, others in the community probably sport different perspective based on thir experience.

 

Good luck,

Alex

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Nadia

I'm fine with mint and ginger teas and rooibos. I've been too afraid to try any "calming" teas like passion flower, orange blossom, linden, etc. in case I get a paradoxical reaction like I did with valerian. Yogi Bedtime Tea was making things worse for me, but I'm not sure which of the ingredients...

 

That is interesting you find ginger tea soothing. I'm not sure if it affects me one way or another.

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Shanti

Yes, I agree about Skullcap. And Valerian. I haven't tried the others, aside from Chamomile. Chamomile doesn't seem strong enough for me. There is also Vervain. Vervain is the plant that Valium was synthesized from.

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Shanti

Vervain

 

"....In addition, the herb is still considered to be an effective sedative or tranquilizer, anti-spasmodic that reduces cramps and muscle pains and an aphrodisiac for arousing sexual desire. Finally, vervain is an excellent stimulant or tonic that helps to calm down nerves and soothe anxiety."

 

I don't know if you can buy this in a tea. But you can find it in capsules at the health food stores and either make a tea from emptying the capsules or just take them. Be careful though as too much can cause vomiting.

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Altostrata

I've only been able to enjoy very weak mint tea, chamomile tea, or fruit teas. Rooribos and others make me feel funny.

 

I look forward to the day when I can have cups of strong black tea, which I enjoyed all my life, or even green tea.

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bruno2016

I am feeling loopy and very calm. I have homework to do but it is far from my mind.

 

I am very sensitive to many 'normal' foodstuffs. Some months ago I made ginger tea with fresh ginger. It was very calming. Too calming; I could never finish a mug.

 

Today, I tried a bit of ginger tea for first time since the spring.

 

I made a weak tea and only drank half of a coffee cup's worth. I am now experiencing 'mellowness' and assorted other things. Stomach is churning.

 

I went to the wikipage on giner. Which includes this bit with a link to an abstract:

 

 

Preliminary research also indicates that nine compounds found in ginger may bind to human serotonin receptors, possibly helping to affect anxiety.

Identification of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonists in ginger. Nievergelt A. Huonker P. Schoop R. Altmann KH. Gertsch J. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry. 18(9):3345-51, 2010 May 1

 

I'm confused. I'd been having a bad day with anxiety and am feeling relief about that. But upset that I am so sensitive to so much. As an ex-drug addict, it's very weird feeling somewhat 'inebriated' which is how I feel right now... and I don't like it. I could get really messed up, maybe even end up in the hospital, just taking certain supplements and fresh foods. If I made this tea with 10x more ginger and drank the whole glass... who knows what'd happen. But, goodness, it's only ginger! Yet, at the same, I'm very happy to have this relief.

 

Anyway, if ginger affects some of the 5-HT receptors, should I not take it... for that reason alone? Doesn't my body need to find its own way? Then again, I'm taking a crapload of benzos, so I'm no snowflake in this deal.

 

God didn't give humans ginger to consume AND brains of egg salad. Still I find myself on this ginger-filled earth with an egg salad-filled cranium.

 

Any advice?

 

Alex

 

ps - Also, do homework or lie down on couch? Anyone care to predict Alex's course of action in the near term?

 

I have recently started oriental medicine and one of the ingredients in my preparation is ginger. I believe there are various types of ginger and also various qualities which could cause different effects. Anyways, I have noticed some good improvements. I have not been waking up with the horrible anxiety lately and in general have a since of well being. Please let this feeling last Lord :P

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Altostrata

Note to self: Get some good ginger tea.

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Barbarannamated

Note to self: Get some good ginger tea.

 

Ditto.

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bruno2016

Note to self: Get some good ginger tea.

 

Maybe you could do a consult with a respectable TCM practitioner? I cant say for sure that it is only the ginger that is helping me, but it may be the combination of things. I was so so happy when I woke up the other day with no anxiety. I really really needed that break. I was waking up early with the scared feeling and the worried feeling with the knots in my stomach. The past couple days I have been sleeping very well. I very much believe that quality makes a big difference so perhaps if you get tea make certain it is a good brand although my TCM practitioner recommended I buy some whole ginger, cut it up, and make my own tea.

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Dani

Note to self: Get some good ginger tea.

 

I will try ginger tea. Any brand in particular?

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Nadia

The best thing you can do is buy fresh ginger. Cut up about a two inch piece into slices, and boil in a quart of water. You can use more or less to get the right potency (it can get pretty spicy). You can reboil the ginger a few times.

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alexjuice

I use fresh ginger just like Nadia. For a time I was very sensitive to ginger tea but I no longer find it sedating.

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Altostrata

Thanks for the tip. I tried putting fresh ginger in superhot water, like I make tea, but it didn't work.

 

It needs to be boiled! Duh.

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EllaMae

Glad I saw this - I just asked in another thread about how to take ginger. I'm going to buy some fresh ginger soon!

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Tom

FWIW...I've tried ginger recently to use as an anti-inflammatory. I think it has potential for me in that regard, however, I seem to have a paradoxical reaction in that it appears to make my GI issues worse. I say paradoxical, because digestion is supposed to be one of the things it's good for.

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alexjuice

Thanks for the report, Tom.

 

I've heard that ginger can aggravate acid reflux/heartburn in some instances. But, like you, I'd otherwise heard it was helpful for digestive issues.

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Tom

Yeah, I think it did exactly that. But then, it's hard to say sometimes what's doing what.

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SouthernFreeze

Just been reading up about oat straw on a few different sites like this one http://www.livestrong.com/article/557691-side-effects-and-benefits-of-the-long-term-use-of-oatstraw/ and this one http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/health-benefits-oat-straw-tea-9852.html And it seems oat straw has the potential to help with cognitive function and nourishing the central nervous system. I was having some regularly before i came on this site but then stopped as i realized how sensitive things are. I see it does have B vitamins in it which could be tricky, I was just curious to know if anyone has used it or had any benefits from using it ?

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Rhiannon

Hi SF, I've drunk oatstraw tea in the past, but not often, usually in a blend. I never had any noticeable strong effects. If you're interested in trying it, you could start with just a little to make a weak tea and see what happens probably. 

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SouthernFreeze

i have tried lots of teas, found some have side effects but work better and so on.

I'm not going to mention all the herb teas i have had, just the ones i can think of right now that might be helpful, and that i have used at least 5 or 6 times.

 

Passion flower - probably one of the more stronger ones, and works well for sleep and anxiety, but then it can have reverse effects if you have it too much.

 

Mother Wort - this works well for sleep and anxiety

 

Chamomile - this for me is safest tea for sleep and relaxing, especially when picked fresh. It has no side effects at all and seems to cut short any caffeine effects.

 

Licorice - very good for sleep, anxiety, and digestion

 

Ginger - calming and good for digestion

 

Lemon balm - calming, and i find it helps the stomach and stops the symptoms of diarrhea 

 

Skullcap - same as most other sleepy teas but not as nice

 

Hops - good for anxiety and sleep, but tastes HORRIBLE!

 

Catnip - similar to lemon balm maybe more stronger, but not as good for the diarrhea thing. I have smoked this and it has the effects of smoking the fan leaves of cannabis.

 

Kawakawa - you can only get this in new zealand i think, it grows everywhere. Part of the Kava family, very peppery and is one of the most effective for a lot of symptoms from a sore stomach to being a sedative 

 

Valerian - This is a great tea for reducing anxiety, but i'm not a massive fan of the taste

 

There are many more maybe i'll type them later. If you mix all these together in the right portions you can make some great tasting and highly effective teas. I think how well they work depends on quality as well. I pick most of mine fresh and dry the ones that need to be dried before use. it seems to be stronger and work much better than when brought in packets from the shop. And then there are different brands.

 

Also i think most herbals teas work mildly, don't ever expect the strength of a man made drug. If it wasn't for the over exaggerated strength of man made drugs these teas probably would seem more effective. 

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SouthernFreeze

Vervain

 

"....In addition, the herb is still considered to be an effective sedative or tranquilizer, anti-spasmodic that reduces cramps and muscle pains and an aphrodisiac for arousing sexual desire. Finally, vervain is an excellent stimulant or tonic that helps to calm down nerves and soothe anxiety."

 

I don't know if you can buy this in a tea. But you can find it in capsules at the health food stores and either make a tea from emptying the capsules or just take them. Be careful though as too much can cause vomiting.

you can buy vervian in bags here, i found it similar to other sleepy teas like skullcap and  mother wort

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SouthernFreeze

i love chamomile, i find a lot of sleepy tea's have some slight degree of side effects but for me chamomile has none, neither with mint or lemon balm, but this tastes nicer. 

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thisismyname

This is interesting, I take a supplement that contains chamomile. Could it be inhibiting the metabolism of citalopram?

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Phil

I had a chamomile tea recently in a lovely tea house that has opened in my city...but I felt all weird afterwards. *sigh*

 

Like Alto I seem to be ok with an occasional peppermint tea only. 

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