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Smoking cessation, nicotine, e-cigs

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GirlfromD

Hi i'm new here, what an helpful site!

 

I am currently going through withdrawal, and it's awful, just plain awful. I'm a smoker, and smoking has previously helped me to calm down when I was stressed out or needed to relax, but at the moment i feel like puking everytime i want a cigarette.

 

So i was wondering, has anyone else in here experienced this too? I tried to quit, cause i know smoking is bad, but at the moment it is very hard to quit with the withdrawal and everything going on.

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nz11

Legan i have never smoked in my life so i cant comment from that perspective.

 

But my feeling is that one should quit one addiction at a time.(in the absence of medical reasons)

 

I was a member of another site for  4yrs and i seem to recall a member 'caperjackie' who was a smoker. [forgive me caper if i have you mixed up with someone else]

 

She quit smoking after paxil wdl i will never forget her comment being something like this..

 

.'After smoking a pack of cigarettes daily for 40 yrs quitting smoking was a walk in the park compared to going through ssri withdrawal"

 

or words to that effect.

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RubyTuesday

I STARTED smoking when I got off SSRIs. very minimal, just 1 cigarette a day or equivalent e-cig. I know it is bad but I need the kick.

general rule is only reduce 1 med at a time including nicotine or caffeine.

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legan

I cant stand the anxiety or hyperventilation . I think i shoild quit smoking though my doctor advised not to . But idk what to do . Im very very nervous .

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LexAnger

I once read here from someone saying quacking smoke made his WD much worse so he went back smoking. It sounds consistent with the idea of one drug/ substance at a time.

 

When our system is super sensitized, change in anything can trigger more catch up of the brain. Just like many said they can't eat lots food during WD, would guess the impact of smoking is greater than food.

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Altostrata

NIcotine is a neurologically active substance.

 

Still, if smoking makes you feel ill, your body is telling you to do it less. A very gradual reduction seems called for, perhaps delaying longer and longer between cigarettes to reduce your daily intake.

 

A friend said she quit smoking by substituting herbal cigarettes (nicotine-free herbs, not marijuana). They're not good for your lungs, either, but at least they're not as addictive. Being able to light up helped her past that behavioral habit, she said she hardly felt nicotine withdrawal.

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legan

Herbal ciggarete . I think theyr helpful . I hope i can fibd them but it seems they stopped naking them

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Petunia

you can buy them online legan, try honeyroseusa.com

 

general rule is only reduce 1 med at a time including nicotine or caffeine.

 

This is good advice. My sister was (most likely) in protracted withdrawal from SSRIs but was taking stimulant meds and seemed to be functioning reasonably well. Then she gave up the stimulants, smoking and caffeine all around the same time and crashed, became bed bound and didn't leave her house for months.

 

She recently started smoking again and is a little better.

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legan

I was thinking if Antipsychotic is dopamine antagonist which help blocking the dopamine . And Smoking raise the dopamine.

 

So when you quit antipsychotic . You remove the blocking of dopamine but if you quit also smoking you stoppped raising that extra dopamine .

 

So quit smoking should help with antipsychotic withdrawals . Am i right ?

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Christian

I used to smoke years ago a 1/2 pack a day. Then I did socially up until November. I gave it up with booze. The thought of either makes me sick while being in WD. I guess it depends on the severity of the WD but I would get sick if I had either of those now. Coffee too. I also used to love ice cream. It's disgusting now. Sorry, got a little off topic

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neroli
On 4/19/2015 at 10:32 AM, Cookson said:

 

Just intrested if anyone else smokes on here? I know it can't help my recovery but when things get really difficult it's a safety net for me, like a close friend giving a me a helping hand in need. It feels like an ancient relic of more joyous happier time that it brings me back for a moement even if only slightly.

I average about 5 cigarettes a day. I May smoke more on bad days with the mentality 'I really honestly don't care anymore it can't get worse then this I need some respite'

Be good to know if I can relate to anyone on this

I can relate.  I smoke because it gives me something to do, a way to have a break and is like a friend (particularly when I'm at home and feeling isolated.  I want to give up but I know it will be an almighty struggle.  The thing is, I think I have worse anxiety, depression and hopelessness when I smoke throughout the day.  I really think it would help my recovery (I've had a breakdown from a-d prescribing that had monumental adverse effects, followed by CT off them and long-term legacy symptoms.  I'm back on meds now, escitalopram, nortriptyline and diazepam which is propping me up but isn't taking away the anxious feelings or the lead legs). I just don't know how I'm going to give up the little "pleasure" I have in life.  It sucks (no pun).

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Ippia

In these days I'm trying to quit smoke but I find it extremely hard. The first days are insane for me. Curiously, at any attempt, I get some opposite sides of those typical for the nicotine withdraw. For example, no insomnia at all. Instead I feel very very sleepy and when i go to bed I fall asleep in a short time (when usually I spent 30-60 minutes). When after, say, 48 hours of no smoking I light up a cigarette, I feel very intense feeling  like I am smoking a super potent drug. I don't know. Are these feelings the same for a "normal" smoker? I think this happens because I'm not 100% come back. 

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Weasel

I have recovered in the last 2 yrs. I tried to go a whole day without smoking yesterday and today I am a mess ( twitches cold hands high anxiety) I know my brain has left me sensitive from the withdrawal but I thought I could quit cigarettes! Is it my brain was used to those chemicals and decided to rebel? I started smoking again this morning but still feel like withdrawal again. Are my 2 yrs of hard work in jeopardy or will I stabilize in a few days? Any thoughts please? 

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Frogie
On April 6, 2018 at 8:05 AM, Weasel said:

I have recovered in the last 2 yrs. I tried to go a whole day without smoking yesterday and today I am a mess ( twitches cold hands high anxiety) I know my brain has left me sensitive from the withdrawal but I thought I could quit cigarettes! Is it my brain was used to those chemicals and decided to rebel? I started smoking again this morning but still feel like withdrawal again. Are my 2 yrs of hard work in jeopardy or will I stabilize in a few days? Any thoughts please? 

I quit smoking 2 years ago in March after over 35 years. Thank goodness my lungs are clear. But this morning I can't catch my breath. I know it's not from smoking, it's WD. But, I would never go back to it again. I don't know if you will stabilize or not. But all that hard work and you gave in? I gave in years ago and wish I wouldn't have, but I can't look back. I wish you luck. I'm not downing you for anything. I made lots of mistakes trying to quit and I finally did it. You will when you are ready.

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Weasel

Should I taper down for quitting cigarettes just like the AD? My brain can’t do cold turkey. 

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WackoSirJacko

I'm 3 weeks into quitting smoking. Tapering I'm down from 45mg paxil to 32.5mg. 

 

So smoking cigarettes is so hard to give up because they contain harman which when smoked acts as an MAOI. And it boosts the addictive affect of nicotine. That's why you don't get the kick from vaping as you do from smoking. In fact there's no clinical evidence that nicotine on it's own for an always non-smoker is addictive at all, it's the addition of harman and other chemicals which create the addiction.

 

Essentially it's a mild anti-depressant so giving up smoking is like a big jump in a taper. Depression and similar symptoms to AD withdrawal are common when giving up. Your dopamine receptors do grow back but this can take 3-4 months, so it's a hard slog.

 

I'm struggling with it at the moment, feel nausea, muzzy head, hard to concentrate, depression. But getting smoking out the way will be a massive massive win on the way back to good mental health. It's just not going to be easy. I'm using a vape which does take the edge off and physically should be loads easier to come off once the brain has adapted from losing those 4000 chemicals from real cigarettes.

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WackoSirJacko

OK doing an update for anyone wanting to go through this in the future.

 

Week 5 and little improvement but do have some. Throughout my taper I've been able to have a few beers at the weekend without too much trouble. Whilst on this smoking quit I've suffered pretty hefty depression after a few drinks for a couple of days, but it does dissipate. Needless to say I think it's best to get a couple of months under your belt before having a drink I reckon. The cravings are still pretty intense, but I reckon all of the above is because ADs have downregulated everything and my brain is scraping around for what neurotransmitters it can find. I figure though that when this happens it's a trigger for the brain to start produce more receptors and kick-start more production. I gave up before when on 20mg of paxil before it pooped and it was nowhere near as bad as this. 

 

I am using a vape with 12mg juice. Be impossible without I reckon. Control your vaping though or else you'll overload on nicotine and make yourself sick.

 

It's pretty tough this, but we're all playing the long run here. This is for those with militant attitudes only I reckon.

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neroli

I tried vaping earlier this month - I was doing it about five times a day as well as cigarettes.  I lowered the nicotine level in the vaping juice because 12mg seemed to make me woozy and have a hot flush.  I don't think I overdid the vape/cigarette combo any more than I would have had on a normal day.  four days in, I was getting increased WD symptoms, so I've back burnered the vape.  I wondered if it was because I was introducing glycol and glycerol and whatever else is in the vape into my already sensitive system.

 

If I have another go at vaping (I'm not ready to give up nicotine, or the habit of inhaling something yet) I reckon I might have to try a slow taper over.  Hmmmm.

 

I just wanted to not have the smell hanging around from cigarettes.

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ChessieCat

I'm an ex-smoker so I understand how hard it can be to quit.  I've actually quit twice, the first time was very hard and I started smoking again due to stress related to my husband's illness.  Quitting the second time was very easy.  I fell pregnant (I wasn't smoking at the time I fell pregnant with my first child) and cigarettes started tasting funny even before I missed a period.  I've been tempted to smoke since then but the cost was prohibitive and I also knew that it was hard to quit, unless I fell pregnant again!

 

Anyway, something that was available back in the 1980s which I did try was graduated cigarette filters.  The ones I had had a hole.  You started with the smallest and then graduated to the largest.  When smoking you were diluting the cigarette smoke with more air and also removing some tar.

 

But be careful that you don't start smoking more cigarettes to make up for the reduction in nicotine otherwise it defeats the purpose.

 

At one time I was trying a DIY method by pricking just below the filter of the cigarette (not the bought filters) and either making the hole larger or making more holes.

 

I did a quick search online and found these:  https://www.amazon.com/One-Step-Time-Addiction-Withdrawal/dp/B0090TB1S2

(I am not affiliated in any way with this product - I searched smoking quit filter)

 

I have no idea if they are the same type as what I used.  There are reviews with varying opinions on Amazon.

 

It's not just the nicotine habit that you have to kick, it's also physical (holding and movement with a cigarette) as well as mental.

 

One thing that I think is one key to helping to quit is to introduce something else to do instead of having a cigarette.  There are many fidget toys available.  Or you could do some paper folding or something else with your hands, knitting, crochet, finger knitting.  Just something to do with your hands instead of holding a cigarette.

 

A fun thing to do might be to learn a nursery rhyme, silly poem or song for the mental side.

 

Something that might also be helpful is trying to work out when you feel like a smoke and what might have caused you to want one.  It might be nicotine top up time which would be indicated by the time since the last one.  However it might be some external or mental thing that makes you reach for one.  In the latter case it would be helpful to try to distract yourself by doing something else.  You might also find learning CBT helpful.

 

Another idea.  For every cigarette that you successfully resist put aside a set amount.  For example $1 for each one.  Having something to show that we have achieved something can be good.  Or a chart with star stickers.  I've been walking over the last 2 months and would write it in my diary and highlight it yellow.  Now I sometimes forget to even write it down because it's become a habit.

 

I haven't smoked since July 1987 (so that's 33 years) and every now and then I still feel like a smoke.  It doesn't happen very often and it surprises me when it does but I just tell myself that I'm not doing that again.

 

Anyway, they are some things that might help so I wanted to pass them on.

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