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Albayrak, 2013 Benefical effects of sigma-1 agonist fluvoxamine for tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia in patients with schizophrenia: report of three cases.


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Psychiatry Investig. 2013 Dec;10(4):417-20. doi: 10.4306/pi.2013.10.4.417. Epub 2013 Oct 24.
Benefical effects of sigma-1 agonist fluvoxamine for tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia in patients with schizophrenia: report of three cases.
Albayrak Y1, Hashimoto K2.

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24474992

Fluvoxamine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is approved for psychiatric disorders such as major depressive episodes and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Beside inhibition of serotonin reuptake, fluvoxamine is also a potent agonist of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein sigma-1 receptors, which play a role in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This report presents beneficial effects of sigma-1 agonist fluvoxamine on hyperkinetic movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia. Fluvoxamine might be a novel treatmet approach in the treatment of hyperkinetic movement disorders.
 

Psychiatry Investig. 2013 Dec;10(4):417-20. doi: 10.4306/pi.2013.10.4.417. Epub 2013 Oct 24.
Benefical effects of sigma-1 agonist fluvoxamine for tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia in patients with schizophrenia: report of three cases.
Albayrak Y1, Hashimoto K2.
Author information
Abstract

Fluvoxamine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is approved for psychiatric disorders such as major depressive episodes and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Beside inhibition of serotonin reuptake, fluvoxamine is also a potent agonist of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein sigma-1 receptors, which play a role in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This report presents beneficial effects of sigma-1 agonist fluvoxamine on hyperkinetic movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia. Fluvoxamine might be a novel treatmet approach in the treatment of hyperkinetic movement disorders.


KEYWORDS: Akathisia; Dyskinesia; Fluvoxamine; Sigma receptor

PMID: 24474992 [PubMed] PMCID: PMC3902161

 
The full text is free. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3902161/
 
Interesting talk about ER stress...
 
I had been focused on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction as the one of the major driving forces behind, as the authors here put it, "hyperkinetic movement disorders".
 
Also take note that fluvoxamine is a sigma-1 agonist first, and an SRI second.

Edited by Altostrata
put into Journals format

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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It's my understanding that the primary cause of tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia in psychiatric patients is psychiatric drugs. 

 

So, more drugs (that we've never studied longterm outcomes of) to treat the problems caused by the other drugs. That should go well.

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

May 2021            7                       0.01                  0.0037                1

Feb 2022            6                      0!!!                     0.00167               0.98                2.5 mg Ambien

Oct 2022       4.5 mg Lamictal    (off Celexa, off Xanax)   0.95 Valium    Ambien, 1/4 to 1/2 of a 5 mg tablet 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Generally, tardive dyskinesia and tardive akathisia are iatrogenic -- drug-caused.

 

These researchers have done other work looking at fluvoxamine to treat iatrogenic problems.
 
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2012;14(6). pii: PCC.12br01401. doi: 10.4088/PCC.12br01401. Epub 2012 Nov 8.
Beneficial effects of the sigma-1 agonist fluvoxamine for tardive dyskinesia in patients with postpsychotic depressive disorder of schizophrenia: report of 5 cases.
Albayrak Y1, Hashimoto K.

Abstract and free full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23585988

OBJECTIVE:
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is characterized by involuntary, repetitive, purposeless movements that can affect different parts of the body. Tardive dyskinesia is a well-known side effect of conventional antipsychotics and commonly occurs after several years of treatment. The effective treatment of TD is unclear. Recently, the sigma-1 receptor agonist fluvoxamine was reported to be beneficial for hyperkinetic movement disorders.

METHOD:
We report 5 cases with postpsychotic depressive disorder of schizophrenia and TD. All patients were given fluvoxamine 100 mg/d, and after the second week the dosage of fluvoxamine was increased to 200 mg/d. At the fourth week, patients were assessed in terms of TD and postpsychotic depressive disorder of schizophrenia.

RESULTS:
Fluvoxamine was found to be beneficial for TD and postpsychotic depressive disorder of schizophrenia in all patients by the fourth week.

CONCLUSIONS:
Recently, the sigma-1 receptor agonist fluvoxamine has been considered beneficial for various neuropsychiatric disorders. However, data about the effects of fluvoxamine on hyperkinetic movement disorders are limited. In this report, we attempted to demonstrate the beneficial effects of fluvoxamine on TD, and we suggest that the mechanism of action might be due to sigma-1 agonism. Further detailed, double-blind studies should clarify the potential use of fluvoxamine in the treatment of hyperkinetic movement disorders.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Yeah, I never suggested that anyone should take fluvoxamine for these conditions. The discussion is interesting as a mode of how these conditions can arise, but no more.

 

Actually, I'll make sure to post papers with only very negative sounding titles, even if the article contains useful information, since that is plain to see that this is the intended use of this sub-forum. Also, I suppose 2013 is not new.

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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Oh, what you've posted is fine! I appreciate this addition. The papers don't have to be new.

 

Though, frankly, I wonder if fluvoxamine is truly effective or if this research is the usual garbage.

 

Please do post interesting papers as you find them. I would appreciate your following the format described here Before you start a topic in Journals....

 

Basically, all you need to do is copy the abstract from PubMed, as I did above, and paste it to start a new topic.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Oh, what you've posted is fine! I appreciate this addition. The papers don't have to be new.

 

Though, frankly, I wonder if fluvoxamine is truly effective or if this research is the usual garbage.

 

Please do post interesting papers as you find them. I would appreciate your following the format described here Before you start a topic in Journals....

 

Basically, all you need to do is copy the abstract from PubMed, as I did above, and paste it to start a new topic.

 

Thank you! I have avoided logging in for days fearing a nasty remark, for I was somewhat petulant. For some reason I felt like, well I can't describe it, but it involves negative evaluations of me by people here. I have issues with hypersensitivity to rejection that are a problem that I need to deal with fairly urgently, as they put empathic people such as yourself in an unfair position and it turns off most other people.

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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Hmmm, you might put those petulant suppositions in the form of a question, a reality check. Then you don't have to be afraid of an angry reaction. (I'm trying to learn how to do this, too.)

 

Please consider: I have to be aware people are finding pages on this site via Google. They might not grasp the context and think fluvoxamine is just the ticket for their symptoms.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Share on other sites

  • Moderator Emeritus

 

Oh, what you've posted is fine! I appreciate this addition. The papers don't have to be new.

 

Though, frankly, I wonder if fluvoxamine is truly effective or if this research is the usual garbage.

 

Please do post interesting papers as you find them. I would appreciate your following the format described here Before you start a topic in Journals....

 

Basically, all you need to do is copy the abstract from PubMed, as I did above, and paste it to start a new topic.

 

Thank you! I have avoided logging in for days fearing a nasty remark, for I was somewhat petulant. For some reason I felt like, well I can't describe it, but it involves negative evaluations of me by people here. I have issues with hypersensitivity to rejection that are a problem that I need to deal with fairly urgently, as they put empathic people such as yourself in an unfair position and it turns off most other people.

 

 

I hope you didn't feel like my comment was aimed at you. My snarkiness is for psychopharmacology and the lovely things they do to people's lives.

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

May 2021            7                       0.01                  0.0037                1

Feb 2022            6                      0!!!                     0.00167               0.98                2.5 mg Ambien

Oct 2022       4.5 mg Lamictal    (off Celexa, off Xanax)   0.95 Valium    Ambien, 1/4 to 1/2 of a 5 mg tablet 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Hi Rhi, I apologize, I was in a mood that I should have better contained. On the subject of psychopharmacology.

 

Psychopharmacology is merely a branch of neuroscience. In my opinion, the problem is not psychopharmacology, which is merely the gathering of knowledge and can not, in my opinion (that is a philosophical argument), be neither bad nor good. I think the problem is people who seek to corrupt the gathering of knowledge (you all know who I mean) or use incomplete knowledge to facilitate gain on their own behalf through the propagation of theories (the gold standard, of course, being "the chemical imbalance theory of mental illness) based on unscientific findings or the twisting of scientific findings. As well, all scientists must be aware that their are not infallible, and we must recognize just the same. Psychopharmacology is a work in progress, an early draft. The embracement of psychopharmacology by larger interests at such a stage and the infiltration process that begun years ago is sad. That being said, much that comes out of psychopharmacological research is good, and is wrought with that same intent.

 

The following information was garned, and is now in my own words, in a blog of which I can not find. A great example I can think of is the trials that got Seroquel approved for depression. Although the trials were industry funded, there is nothing to suggest (that we know of) that any of the findings, in methodology or results, have been twisted or untrue. The discussion and conclusions were of course, titled. HAM-D results soared in these trials, mostly on account of increased appetite and reduction in insomnia, as might be expected from Seroquel. The authors then used the higher HAM-D score as evidence that Seroquel is an effective antidepressant. Of course, increased appetite and sleeping for 14 hours a night don't necessarily mean that depression has been alleviated... The FDA, of course, overlooked this minor oversight.

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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Please consider: I have to be aware people are finding pages on this site via Google. They might not grasp the context and think fluvoxamine is just the ticket for their symptoms.

 

Thank you and understood now.

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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