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Surinkaew, 2011 Roles of mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor in the heart.


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Can J Cardiol. 2011 Mar-Apr;27(2):262.e3 -13. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2010.12.023.

Roles of mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor in the heart.

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  • 1Department of Physiology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21459278#

 

Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (mBzR) is a type of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor that is located in the outer membrane of mitochondria. It is an 18-kDa protein that can form a multimeric complex with voltage-dependent anion channel (32 kDa) and adenine nucleotide translocator (30 kDa). mBzR is found in various species and abundantly distributed in peripheral tissues, including the cardiovascular system. The mitochondria are well known as the site of energy production, and the heart is the organ that highly requires this energy supply. In the past decades, it has been shown that mBzR plays a critical role in regulating mitochondrial and heart functions. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that mBzR is associated with regulation of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species production. Moreover, mBzR has been suggested to play a role in alteration of physiological effects in the heart such as contractility and heart rate. mBzR is involved in the pathologic condition such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, responses to stress, and changes in electrophysiological properties and arrhythmogenesis. In this review, evidence of the roles of mBzR in the heart under both physiological and pathologic conditions is presented. Clinical studies regarding the use of pharmacologic intervention involving mBzR in the heart are also discussed as a possible target for the treatment of electrical and mechanical dysfunction in the heart.

Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

 

PMID: 21459278 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

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@A mod: I forget to put the year, 2011, in the title.

 

My review of previous knowledge: There exists a "peripheral benzodiazepine receptor". The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor is now officially called the "Translocator Protein". All major benzodiazepines bind to this receptor. It is involved in a huge number of physiological processes in the body, including those in the heart. The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor is now a drug development target for both cardiovascular and psychiatric use.

 

My take: It is not inconceivable that the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor is responisble for many of the WD effects of benzodiazepines. 

 

My take on this study: This study makes reference to "mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors (mBzR)". This receptor is most likely the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein since it is also an 18-kDa protein. This study focuses in on the role of this receptor on cardiac function, which is often perturbed in benzodiazepine WD.

Edited by Altostrata
title edited, added link to Pubmed

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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I just found a study in my stash which refers to the presence of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in rat heart mitochondria. Apparently activation of the receptor through an endogenous ligand is protective against cardiomyopathy.

 

For those that might come across my postings here, I am not advocating the use of benzodiazepines, but trying to further understand benzodiazepine WD.

 

"The peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor Modulates Ca2+ Transport through the VDAC in Rat Heart Mitochondria"

 

The full text appears to be freely available with a quick Google search (I had printed the study a while back so I am looking at it in paper in full text form as well).

April / 2016: Cipralex 10 mg, Mirtazapine 30 mg, Lyrica 600 mg, Diazepam 20 mg, Bystolic 5 mg

2018: Lots of polypharmacy which is undocumented here. Started and stopped several drugs and changed doses of existing ones

August / 2018: Back on track! Cipralex 15 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg, Diazepam 15 mg

September 2018: Cipralex 15 mg -> 12.5 mg

October 2018: Cipralex 12.5 mg -> 10 mg, Mirtazapine 7.5 mg -> 3.75 mg -> Stopped, Diazepam 15 mg

November 2019: Cipralex 5 mg, Diazepam 10 mg

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This is very interesting. Several of us have found taurine helpful in treating tachycardia and palpitations in withdrawal. I read in an obscure, unreliable place that taurine is a precursor to GABA. There is so much we don't know, and so much we do know. Thank you for your contributions!

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Zyprexa started about 9/06, mostly 5mg. Tapered 4/12 through12/29/12

Wellbutrin. XL 300 mg started 1/07, tapered 1/18/13 through 7/8/13

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