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Probiotics function mechanistically as delivery vehicles for neuroactive compounds


Phil
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Saw this on twitter, thought it might be of interest to some:

 

http://dmmsclick.wiley.com/view.asp?m=5s2bq8sk849yzusenifn&u=9280160&f=h

 

It talks about how probotioics can affect neurochemical changes.

 

Gianna on the Beyond Meds blog also has a section on probiotics and gut health.

 

Has anyone here tried them?

Edited by Altostrata
put paper title in topic title

Off Lexapro since 3rd November 2011.

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I would try to drink a lot of kefir, which is very good for the gut system. I tested it and have no problems so far. Besides, my gastro system seems to be much better than it was some months ago.

End of 2008: Remeron 15mg for around 2 months. Unorthodox taper, no problems.
End of August 2009: Lexapro 10mg for only 4 days. Panic attack after 3 pills. Severe gastro problems in the morning for 3 days after last pill. 2 weeks later strong w/d symptoms set in.

Acute WD lasted around 3.5 years. I am feeling much better today, 5.5 years out, but still have some symptoms left.

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Interesting...

 

I've started taking probiotics in hopes of combating my constant diarrhea. If it helps my brain, too, great!

 

As far as most of the suggestions I've read go, this one seems closest in my mind to "can't hurt, might help."

 

I'd be interested in reading the paper when it becomes available.

History is approximate; I didn't track my dosages.

 

1995 - started zoloft/sertraline for depression

1995-2008 - sertraline ranged from 100-200mg, may have gone as high as 250mg

2006 - 2009 - added welbutrin/budeprion SR, 150 mg

sometime in 2009-2010 - stopped budeprion c/t

sometime around 2009-2010, Tapered down sertraline w/o guidance to 50 mg, then 25mg.

~ feb 2010, stopped sertraline.

~ Apr 2010, resumed 25mg low dose (really bad business trip)

Oct 2010, stopped sertraline

Jan 2011 - another bad business trip "breaks" my sleep.

 

current issues include insomnia, anxiety, GI distress, depression.

Taking multivitamins, Vitamin D, fish oil, Chinese herbs, ~ 0.5mg melatonin in the evening.

Going to therapy and acupuncture once a week.

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Interesting...yeah, there's an article about this stuff in the latest Sci News. Experiments on mice and how changing the bacteria in their guts changed their behavior. I'm not crazy about science these days, but it's intriguing.

 

I just posted a long post about this in a different thread: http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/782-i-give-up/

 

I'm experimenting with the GAPS diet that's helped Gianna. It's designed to repopulate and heal your natural intestinal flora and allow your gut lining to heal. We'll see. I'm just trying it because I want my gut to be happy, now that I've found out how much it affects my brain.

Started on Prozac and Xanax in 1992 for PTSD after an assault. One drug led to more, the usual story. Got sicker and sicker, but believed I needed the drugs for my "underlying disease". Long story...lost everything. Life savings, home, physical and mental health, relationships, friendships, ability to work, everything. Amitryptiline, Prozac, bupropion, buspirone, flurazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, Paxil, citalopram, lamotrigine, gabapentin...probably more I've forgotten. 

Started multidrug taper in Feb 2010.  Doing a very slow microtaper, down to low doses now and feeling SO much better, getting my old personality and my brain back! Able to work full time, have a full social life, and cope with stress better than ever. Not perfect, but much better. After 23 lost years. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for. And "medicine for profit" is just not a great idea.

 

Feb 15 2010:  300 mg Neurontin  200 Lamictal   10 Celexa      0.65 Xanax   and 5 mg Ambien 

Feb 10 2014:   62 Lamictal    1.1 Celexa         0.135 Xanax    1.8 Valium

Feb 10 2015:   50 Lamictal      0.875 Celexa    0.11 Xanax      1.5 Valium

Feb 15 2016:   47.5 Lamictal   0.75 Celexa      0.0875 Xanax    1.42 Valium    

2/12/20             12                       0.045               0.007                   1 

May 2021            7                       0.01                  0.0037                1

Feb 2022            6                      0!!!                     0.00167               0.98                2.5 mg Ambien

Oct 2022       4.5 mg Lamictal    (off Celexa, off Xanax)   0.95 Valium    Ambien, 1/4 to 1/2 of a 5 mg tablet 

 

I'm not a doctor. Any advice I give is just my civilian opinion.

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Even if one is not in wd, a balanced gut system is so important for a healthy life. Many diseases stem from a wrong nutrition. I surely will keep up my kefir consumption and see how it helps :)

End of 2008: Remeron 15mg for around 2 months. Unorthodox taper, no problems.
End of August 2009: Lexapro 10mg for only 4 days. Panic attack after 3 pills. Severe gastro problems in the morning for 3 days after last pill. 2 weeks later strong w/d symptoms set in.

Acute WD lasted around 3.5 years. I am feeling much better today, 5.5 years out, but still have some symptoms left.

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Thanks for posting this, Phil. It seems one may request a pdf of the study from Lifesciencenews@wiley.com

 

What this is about is a delivery system for drugs. But at least they're looking at "whole body" explanations for feelings of well-being!

 

I like kefir, too.

 

The press release Phil noted in #1 is available now: http://dmmsclick.wiley.com/view.asp?m=5s2bq8sk849yzusenifn&u=9280160&f=h

 

Lifesciencenews@wiley.com

 

A Gut-Full of Probiotics for Your Neurological Well-Being

 

Probiotics, often referred to as ‘good bacteria’, are known to promote a healthy gut, but can they promote a healthy mind? Exploring the new world of neurological probiotics, researchers in BioEssays present new ideas on how neurochemicals delivered directly to the gut, via probiotic intestinal microbiota, exert their beneficial effects in maintaining gastrointestinal health and even psychological well-being.

 

The research, led by Professor Mark Lyte from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, proposes that through a unifying process of microbial endocrinology, neurochemical-producing probiotics could act as a delivery mechanism for neuroactive compounds that could improve a host’s gastrointestinal and psychological health.

 

“This paper proposes a new field of microbial endocrinology, where microbiology meets neuroscience,” said Lyte. “There is already evidence to suggest that the connection between gut microbes and the nervous system represents a viable route for influencing neurological function. A recent study in mice, for example, showed that the presence of neurochemicals such a serotonin in the bloodstream was due to direct uptake from the gut.”

 

In his hypothesis Professor Lyte considers the selection of probiotics, such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, and how the active uptake of neurochemicals, generated by bacteria in the gut and circulated through a patient’s bloodstream, represents a pathway for probiotics to exert extra-intestinal effects including behavioral changes.

 

Writing in a commentary piece in the same issue of BioEssays Professor Gregor Reid, from the University of Western Ontario, outlines some of the potential clinical implications of this research.

 

“Until recently the idea that probiotic bacteria administered to the intestine could influence the brain seemed almost surreal”, said Reid, “Yet in Lyte’s paper the concept is supported by studies showing that microbes can produce and respond to neurochemicals, which can induce neurological and immunological effects on the host.”

 

“The research presents an idea for selecting probiotic strains with neurological applications and linking this with immune-modulatory effects, while highlighting the fact that microbial strains already being widely ingested in fermented food can produce neurochemicals,” concluded Reid. “Could this mean that adjunct treatment for people suffering from certain types of mental health problems is a fecal transplant? Food for thought.”

 

This study is published in BioEssays Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact Lifesciencenews@wiley.com

 

Full citation:

•Lyte. M, “Probiotics function mechanistically as delivery vehicles for neuroactive compounds: Microbial Endocrinology in the design and use of probiotics” BioEssays, Wiley-Blackwell, July 2011, DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100024

 

•Reid. G, “Neuroactive probiotics”, BioEssays, Wiley-Blackwell July 2011, DOI: 10.1002/ bies.201100074

 

About the Authors:

Professor Mark Lyte is based at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, where he carries out research into commensal bacteria, including the discovery that bacteria can actively respond to neuroendocrine hormones and change both their rate of growth and production of virulence-associated factors. Professor Lyte’s current projects include an examination of neurochemical containing foods to influence the intestinal microbial composition and alter both immune and behavioral status. He is also editor of the book “Microbial Endocrinology” (Springer 2010). Amongst other recognitions, he is a recipient of the Joseph Susman Memorial Award for Surgical Infectious Disease Research, awarded by the surgical Infection Society of North America. He was also a finalist for the National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer Award.

 

Professor Gregor Reid is a Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Western Ontario, and Chair in Human Microbiology and Probiotics at the Lawson Health Research Institute. In 2001, he was appointed chair of United Nations - World Health Organization Expert Panel and Working Group on Probiotics. In 2006, he was appointed President of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics. His work with Western Heads East, has helped set up community kitchens in Tanzania, Kenya and Rwanda, where local mothers make probiotic yogurt for people of all ages including those with HIV/AIDS. He has an Honorary Doctorate from Orebro University in Sweden and is a recent Distinguished Alumni of Massey University in New Zealand.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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  • 1 month later...

At one point in my withdrawal of the past few years I had no good bacteria left in my digestive system due to almost constant use of antibiotics starting a few years before I quit Effexor cold turkey. I took probiotics as suggests by a clinic doctor three pills three times a day. It fixed the problem.

I recently have been told I have low immunity due to low gamma globulins.. IgG how it is known on a blood test makes up 80% of a normal immune system. It seems on antibiotic treatment is never enough to beat an infection in my case suspected cause is the low IgG levels. I am going to see yet another specialist for this issue. I am quit interested in how probiotics may be helpful to the immune system. I will be contacting the people above and if I learn anything new I will post it.

In the mean time probiotics in my case were safe effective stop the runs for me.

Still I do not suggest you take three pills three times a day as that was the doc ordered dose... as when starting anything new start very slow maybe one pill a day and increase only if they don't do anything bad to you... just my thoughts.

I am curious if anyone else on here has an immunity issue.

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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  • 1 month later...
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Moved to Media as this is topic links to an article about the paper rather than the paper itself.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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