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Probiotics to boost Neurotransmitters


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Probiotics to boost your Neurotransmitters: Cheat Sheet

A long-time fanatic of natural supplements, I am so excited that our field is recognizing the effects of a healthy gut-brain connection. The significant finding of 2013 that probiotic therapy was found to alleviate autism-like symptoms in mice has stimulated more discussion on how the helpful bacteria in your gut works in symphony with your brain chemicals.

Reading labels of probiotic supplements can be daunting, so I’ve compiled a short list of what I look for with regard to helping neurotransmitter functioning:

Lactobacillus helveticus & Bifidobacterium longum: found to reduce cortisol levels, a hormone that is frequently elevated in those who suffer from depression
Lactobacillus rhamnosus: increase the production of GABA, the neurotransmitter responsible for calming our nervous system and reducing anxiety and mental ruminations often seen with depression and OCD
Bifidobacterium infantis: a microbe capable of producing serotonin, much like Prozac
Lactobacillus acidophilus: improves functioning of cannabinoid receptors in the spinal cord, the receptors critical to regulating pain
Bacteriodes fragilis: Known to bolster the immune system, this was the microbe used in the study mentioned above that reduced the neurological patterns of autism-like behavior (California Institute of Technology)
Bifidobacterium infantis & Lactobacillus reuteri: these guys attack inflammation, a hallmark of depression and autoimmune responses, and also influence the appetite by sending “I’m full” signals to the brain. L. reuteri also stimulates oxytocin, the hormone responsible for our safe and social feelings when we are with loved ones.

Finding a quality probiotic is essential to achieving the full benefit of the supplementation. Many are physician prescribed-only, as are those we use in our Saturday Clean group therapy program (see Group Therapy: Weight Loss & Detoxification). For more information on how you can improve your neurotransmitter functioning and/or inquiries about the group program, contact Dr. Duke at 847-728-0705.

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*Disclaimer: The medical information provided on this site is of a general nature and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified medical professional

March 10, 2014
 

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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Share on other sites

Lactobacillus reuteri is a species of bacteria that belongs to one of the major lactic-acid producing genera of bacteria. It can be found in the human intestinal tract, though not always and often in relatively low numbers. Lactobacillus reuteri is also found in the gut of other mammals and birds.


Initially, Lactobacillus reuteri was used to treat necrotizing colitis, a gastrointestinal disease characterized by infection and inflammation that is particularly dangerous for infants, particularly those born prematurely. Lactobacillus reuteri was used due to its anti-inflammatory effects. The research on Lactobacillus reuteri and necrotizing colitis used the Lactobacillus reuteri strains ATCC 55730 and its daughter strain DSM 17938, both of which can survive oral supplementation.


Interest in Lactobacillus reuteri grew after research confirmed that changing aspects of the digestive system can influence the immune system. A strain of Lactobacillus reuteri called ATCC PTA 6475 has been found to improve levels of testosterone and oxytocin, as well as skin quality in animal studies. Research on animals has also found potential benefits for hair quality, bone mass and preventing weight gain from obesity-causing diets.


One of the ways Lactobacillus reuteri may work involves a kind of T cell called a Treg cell (a T cell that down-REGulates the immune system in part by producing a cytokine called IL-10). Lactobacillus reuteri increases the amount of Treg cells in the body, which suppresses the actions of another kind of T cell called a Th17 cell (which secretes IL-17). Preserving or reversing this process (either by increasing IL-10 or by blocking IL-17) appears to provide therapeutic benefits.


Lactobacillus reuteri increases the number of Treg cells in the intestines, which can then be absorbed back into the blood to benefit the rest of the body.


By producing histamine,[42] L. reuteri ATCC 6475 exerts a number of antiinflammatory actions, including suppression of TNF-α. Histamine is produced from L-histidine via histidine decarboxylase, which is expressed via a histidine decarboxylase gene cluster present in a few Lactobacillus species.[43][44] Inhibiting any single gene in this cluster reduced but did not ablate the inhibitory effects of L. reuteri on TNF-α signalling, suggesting that multiple genes in this cluster are responsible.[42] Histamine suppression of TNF-α occurs via activation of the histamine H2 receptor[42][45]


L. reuteri ATCC 6475 has also been shown to reduce levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A after oral ingestion in mice,[46][10] which is mediated by increased production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 via histamine-activation of the H2 receptor.[47] Upon binding to the IL-10 receptor, IL-10 suppresses IL-17 producing T cells.[48][49]


 



9.2. Oxytocin

 


Ingestion of L. reuteri ATCC 6475 in rats has been noted to increase social grooming as well as serum oxytocin,[10] both of which are linked in many species.[90] Due to the ability of IL-10 to influence hypothalamic function where oxytocin is produced,[91][92] it has been hypothesized that oxytocin mediates the interaction between the gut and skin.[93]



15.1. Vitamin D

 


Serum Vitamin D has been noted to increase when 2.9x109 CFU of the strain of L. reuteri known as NCIMB 30242 was consumed twice daily over the course of 13 weeks by hypercholesterolemic adults.[21] Over the course of this trial, there was a slight decrease in vitamin D levels noted in the placebo arm, while there was a 25.5% increase noted with NCIMB 30242, increasing serum 25-dihydroxyvitamin D from 67.91nM to 82.64nM with no influence on other measured vitamins in serum (β-carotene or Vitamin E).[21]


 


http://examine.com/supplements/Lactobacillus+reuteri/


WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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  • Administrator

It's extremely unlikely that a probiotic "boosts" neurotransmitters. This article answers the challenge of "how many buzzwords can you fit on a Web page?"

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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Interest in Lactobacillus reuteri grew after research confirmed that changing aspects of the digestive system can influence the immune system. A strain of Lactobacillus reuteri called ATCC PTA 6475 has been found to improve levels of testosterone and oxytocin, as well as skin quality in animal studies. Research on animals has also found potential benefits for hair quality, bone mass and preventing weight gain from obesity-causing diets.

 

 

9.2. Oxytocin

 

Ingestion of L. reuteri ATCC 6475 in rats has been noted to increase social grooming as well as serum oxytocin,[10] both of which are linked in many species.[90] Due to the ability of IL-10 to influence hypothalamic function where oxytocin is produced,[91][92] it has been hypothesized that oxytocin mediates the interaction between the gut and skin.[93]

 

remember my Vit D troubles hmmm

 

 

15.1. Vitamin D

 

Serum Vitamin D has been noted to increase when 2.9x109 CFU of the strain of L. reuteri known as NCIMB 30242 was consumed twice daily over the course of 13 weeks by hypercholesterolemic adults.[21] Over the course of this trial, there was a slight decrease in vitamin D levels noted in the placebo arm, while there was a 25.5% increase noted with NCIMB 30242, increasing serum 25-dihydroxyvitamin D from 67.91nM to 82.64nM with no influence on other measured vitamins in serum (β-carotene or Vitamin E).[21]

 

http://examine.com/supplements/Lactobacillus+reuteri/

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's extremely unlikely that a probiotic "boosts" neurotransmitters. This article answers the challenge of "how many buzzwords can you fit on a Web page?"

 

There are the scientific articles that back up what they say

 

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(Common phrases used by users for this page include reuteri benefits, lactobacillus. casei cancer. capsules.dy, lactobacillus ruteri acidophilus, dogs and reutri drops, atcc 6475, Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 6475)

(Users who contributed to this page include GregoryLopezKamalPatelKurtisFrankBillWillisdbarvinok)

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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Yes, bacteria live in the intestinal tract. That is all those references say.

 

Stop here, btdt.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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  • 5 months later...
Nomoreheadmeds

I find normal live yoghurt helps with the stomach upsets caused by withdrawals

Sertraline 100mg amytrip 60mg diazepam 4mg (and when needed) since late 90's.Reduced all meds over 6 wks (too short) last doses 13 wks ago.Still having withdrawals.I would have done it differently

5th august 2015 reinstated 5mg amytripiline.increased to 10mg amtrip 9th sept 2015.

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I think Probiotics are a great idea to put good bacteria back in our systems but I am not sure whether or not it would help so early in WD? My digestive tract is super sensitive and I didn't feel it helped. I stop maybe 3 months ago. I wanted to restart when my body gains some strength

Was on 30mg (Lexapro) for 7-8yrs20mg for 3 months (This was my choice my Doc wanted me to drop much faster)15 mg 2week10mg 2 weeks 5 mg 1 week0 since August 24th . PPI Dexlant  30 mg taper has begun. Cutting 20% currently.  using zantac as needed.  Benzo is currently 0.10mg 

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If it doesn't feel good, stop doing it.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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I didn't feel it helped and I didn't feel it hurt.

Was on 30mg (Lexapro) for 7-8yrs20mg for 3 months (This was my choice my Doc wanted me to drop much faster)15 mg 2week10mg 2 weeks 5 mg 1 week0 since August 24th . PPI Dexlant  30 mg taper has begun. Cutting 20% currently.  using zantac as needed.  Benzo is currently 0.10mg 

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