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http://www.amazon.com/RANTing-OUt-Devil-M-Hill/dp/1847470181  can look inside the book at Amazon wd the very last paragraph available

 

 

Google books has some pages... they seems very different from the previous preview... would like to see this book but not sure I could ever get it..let me know if you get it please 

https://books.google.ca/books?id=B_IEybNaymQC&pg=PT93&lpg=PT93&dq=Times%27+Sunday+health+section,+psychiatrist+Nanette+Gartrell&source=bl&ots=BXiUrqBq5I&sig=K0FT0R-ZZ1PKEw1ucW55h-_Q-OU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8VE2Vd_pKtOWyASNl4DABw&ved=0CEAQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Times'%20Sunday%20health%20section%2C%20psychiatrist%20Nanette%20Gartrell&f=false

 

 

 

 

I would never have heard of this author had I not found this old article:

 

A Doctors Toxic Shock 

 

http://www.medicatio...ide_effects.php

In the Times' Sunday health section, psychiatrist Nanette Gartrell reveals her personal experience -- and lack of awareness -- about antidepressant side effects ("A Doctor's Toxic Shock").1 Grieving over a friend dying of liver cancer, Dr. Gartrell began taking buproprion, better known as Wellbutrin, but her reaction could just as easily have occurred with Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Celexa, Lexapro, Luvox, Effexor, Sarafem or other antidepressants, or Zyban, the smoking-cessation drug that's identical to Wellbutrin.

"Within 10 days, I developed insomnia, agitation and tremors," Dr. Gartrell writes. "I lost the ability to distinguish between sadness and the drug's side effects.... panic attacks started... I needed every ounce of energy to concentrate at work.... I forced myself to eat but still lost 10 pounds. Sometimes I felt paranoid, and I wondered if I was delusional. When I wasn't working, I was curled in a fetal position, contemplating whether I should hospitalize myself."

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/04/magazine/lives-a-doctor-s-toxic-shock.html

 

A shrink takes and Ad two links to this if you want to look... not sure but it seems the book linked above was the result of this one time attempt at AD use... but can 't be sure as I have not read the book 

 

 

 

 

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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2009: Cancer hospital said I had adjustment disorder because I thought they were doing it wrong. Their headshrinker prescribed Effexor, and my life set on a new course. I didn't know what was ahead, like a passenger on Disneyland's Matterhorn, smiling and waving as it climbs...clink, clink, clink.

2010: Post surgical accidental Effexor discontinuation by nurses, masked by intravenous Dilaudid. (The car is balanced at the top of the track.) I get home, pop a Vicodin, and ...

Whooosh...down, down, down, down, down...goes the trajectory of my life, up goes my mood and tendency to think everything is a good idea.
2012: After the bipolar jig was up, now a walking bag of unrelated symptoms, I went crazy on Daytrana (the Ritalin skin patch by Noven), because ADHD was a perfect fit for a bag of unrelated symptoms. I was prescribed Effexor for the nervousness of it, and things got neurological. An EEG showed enough activity to warrant an epilepsy diagnosis rather than non-epileptic ("psychogenic") seizures.

:o 2013-2014: Quit everything and got worse. I probably went through DAWS: dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome. I drank to not feel, but I felt a lot: dread, fear, regret, grief: an utter sense of total loss of everything worth breathing about, for almost two years.

I was not suicidal but I wanted to be dead, at least dead to the experience of my own brain and body.

2015: I  began to recover after adding virgin coconut oil and organic grass-fed fed butter to a cup of instant coffee in the morning.

I did it hoping for mental acuity and better memory. After ten days of that, I was much better, mood-wise. Approximately neutral.

And, I experienced drowsiness. I could sleep. Not exactly happy, I did 30 days on Wellbutrin, because it had done me no harm in the past. 

I don't have the DAWS mood or state of mind. It never feel like doing anything if it means standing up.

In fact, I don't especially like moving. I'm a brain with a beanbag body.   :unsure:

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http://ethics.harvard.edu/lisa-cosgrove-and-robert-whitaker-%C2%A0%E2%80%94%C2%A0-psychiatry-under-influence-case-study

 

Under the Influence: A Case Study of Institutional Corruption

The April 17, 2013 Lab seminar was led by Professor Lisa Cosgrove and Mr. Robert Whitaker, who are both Edmond J. Safra Center Fellows. During this fellowship year they have been collaborating on a project addressing ethical and medico-legal issues that arise in psychiatry because of financial conflicts of interest. Professor Cosgrove began the seminar by presenting a brief summary of their findings on biases present in the activities of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), which serves both as an educational organization on mental health as well as a professional guild for practicing psychiatrists. Through a comparative study of the 5th Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disease (DSM-5) and its previous iterations, she emphasized how lack of biological markers and standardized diagnosis procedures make psychiatry more vulnerable to financial influence than other medical sub- sectors. Furthermore, she highlighted how financial conflicts of interests impact the recommendations of the APA. For example, DSM panelists who are also performing pharmacological clinical studies may be more susceptible to expanding the definition of the condition their drug treats.

Following the presentation, participants questioned whether uncertainty necessitated increased corruption and concluded that the nebulous boundaries of psychiatric diagnoses serve among the range of causes that have rendered the profession vulnerable to corrupting influences. They also noted that a certain degree of consumer/patient bias leads to psychiatrists' over-diagnosis and over-treatment since they often want an easy out, like medication, rather than a recommendation to exercise or attend therapy sessions.

Whitaker then presented on the historical evolution of APA policies to more effectively attract patients and donations from pharmaceutical companies. He described how the APA's efforts to preserve the psychiatric profession resulted in a public relations campaign that emphasized the distinction between psychiatrists and social workers or psychologists, who are not able to prescribe medicine. The APA also decided to allow pharmaceutical companies to sponsor scientific symposia, where they would dictate which scientists could speak on issues relevant to their interests. Participants discussed the ways that such guild effects, or internal financial conflicts of interests, can serve as corrupting influences in addition to those exerted externally, in the form of donations from pharmaceutical companies, for example. Following this more general historical analysis of the APA, Professor Cosgrove and Whitaker presented two different examples where scientistic studies, the first on Xanax, and the second on antidepressant medication, were demonstrably biased in favor of pharmaceutical companies' interests.

In summary, participants discussed how various aspects of the APA's activities reflect institutional corruption originating both externally from pharmaceutical companies and internally from survival instinct. They specifically engaged in conversations about the uncertain methods and classifications within psychiatry itself, APA's physician recommendations, accepting donations from pharmaceutical companies, and presenting substantially biased research on pharmaceutical drugs to the public, among other issues.

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1096-introducing-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)

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