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Liebert, 2009 "There are always two sides to these things": managing the dilemma of serious adverse effects from SSRIs.


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"Overall, our analysis highlights ways in which evidence of serious adverse effects from SSRIs can be rhetorically contained and undermined."

 

Soc Sci Med. 2009 May;68(10):1882-91. Epub 2009 Apr 1.

"There are always two sides to these things": managing the dilemma of serious adverse effects from SSRIs.

Liebert R, Gavey N.

 

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Department of Psychology, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. rachel.liebert@gmail.com

 

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19342139 Full text requested.

 

Over the past two decades, evidence and regulatory responses have surfaced regarding associations between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serious adverse effects, especially akathisia, aggression and suicidality. Given increasing concern about depression prevalence and harm, the dominance of biomedical approaches, and the normalisation of antidepressant use, reports about the potential for serious adverse effects from SSRIs present a dilemma for people working in depression intervention: the drugs are linked to "two conflicting claims" that they may either decrease or increase harm. We present data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with nine professionals in New Zealand working in fields relating to depression and supportive of SSRIs, to investigate the negotiation of this dilemma. We analysed participants' talk about akathisia, aggression and suicidality associated with SSRIs, and found the use of rhetorical strategies that minimised the significance of risks, countered risks with notions of benefit and/or questioned the validity of risks. These discursive resources provided ways of mitigating the dilemma otherwise posed by evidence of adverse drug effects. However in doing so they referenced notions of SSRI benefit that relied upon assumptions about the efficacy of the drugs, risks of untreated depression, and the impact of adverse effects. Overall, our analysis highlights ways in which evidence of serious adverse effects from SSRIs can be rhetorically contained and undermined.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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  • 4 weeks later...

Unable to wrap my head around the rhetorical implications

Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

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Basically a compendium of rationalization doctors give patients when they complain about effects from the drugs, wrapped in academic-speak.

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

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  • Altostrata changed the title to Liebert, 2009 "There are always two sides to these things": managing the dilemma of serious adverse effects from SSRIs.
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