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One in six US adults takes psychiatric drugs, study says


Purplestars22
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http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/12/health/psychiatric-drug-use/index.html?sr=fbCNN122416psychiatric-drug-use0330PMStoryLink&linkId=32672589

 


Discussion prompted by report that pilot of crashed plane took "heavy depression medicine"

- Video discussion between CNN anchor and a doctor
- article citing statistics of 2013 study on use of psychiatric medication

Edited by scallywag
added context for links

Celexa 20mg 2008-2012 for Social Anxiety

Failed attempt to stop reinstated

1 year taper skipping doses

Celexa free 12/2013

1/2014-5/2014 took 5 htp every other day

Failed Reinstatement 5mg of Celexa on 12/2014 for 5 days only

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In a related piece, Mercola expands on this, providing context and alternatives:

 

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/12/29/over-prescribed-antidepressants.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20161229Z1&et_cid=DM129480&et_rid=1818923946

 

From the article:

 

U.S. health care expenses have also risen, hitting $3.2 trillion annually as of 2015, and rising prescription prices combined with over-prescribing are significant drivers of these rising costs, according to a government report.2,3,4,5

 

While psychiatric drugs were not included in that report, statistics reveal a very clear trend of over-prescribing here as well. According to recent research, 1 in 6 Americans are now on antidepressants or some other type of psychiatric drug, and most appear to be taking them long-term.6,7,8,9,10

 

That's quite an extraordinary number, and a significant increase, nearly doubled, from 2011 when 1 in 10 American adults reported using a psychiatric drug.11According to lead author Thomas J. Moore, a researcher at the Institute for Safe Medication Practices:12

 

 

"To discover that 8 in 10 adults who have taken psychiatric drugs are using them long term raises safety concerns, given that there's reason to believe some of this continued use is due to dependence and withdrawal symptoms."

 

Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, commented on the findings saying it reflects a growing reliance on prescription medications to manage common emotional problems.

Drug free May 22, 2015 after 30 years of neuroleptics, benzos, z-drugs, so-called "anti"-depressants, and amphetamines 

 

My Success Story:  Shep's Success: "Leaving Plato's Cave"

 

And what is good, Phaedrus, and what is not good — need we ask anyone to tell us these things? ~ Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance


I am not a medical professional and this is not medical advice, but simply information based on my own experience, as well as other members who have survived these drugs.

 

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