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Petunia

The Dr. Claire Weekes Method of Recovering from a Sensitized Nervous System

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AlienResources

Hope and Help for Your Nerves by Weekes

 

 

I started reading the book OP posted but am disgusted by how the author keeps reccomending the long term use of benzodiazepines. How am I supposed to take the book seriously now?

 

Which book are you referring to by which author?

 

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ChessieCat

My thought is don't throw out the baby with the bath water.  I haven't read any of her books, only listened to some of her videos.  Throw out anything relating to drugs (thankfully we know that it can be inadvisable to use them) and keep the non-drug coping techniques.

 

Being born in 1903 she was 60 years old when valium came on the market.

 

 

Benzo history from wiki:

 

The first such drug, chlordiazepoxide (Librium), was discovered accidentally by Leo Sternbach in 1955, and made available in 1960 by Hoffmann–La Roche, which, since 1963, has also marketed the benzodiazepine diazepam (Valium).[1] In 1977 benzodiazepines were globally the most prescribed medications.[2]

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Lorin

does someone helped by her books and felt less simphtoms?

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ShakeyJerr
On 5/15/2017 at 0:53 AM, ChessieCat said:

My thought is don't throw out the baby with the bath water.

 

Yeah - it does get jarring sometimes when she writes about the benefits of sedation or shock therapy. I have to remind myself that she wrote her books in the late 60s, when those things were still accepted and the long-term effects were not really understood.

 

Still, she knows her stuff when it comes to the other ways of dealing with anxiety.

 

SJ

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PH1

My wife and I have found Claire Weekes so helpful in addressing anxiety.     Her voice is comforting and she is very compassionate.   I encourage everyone to read Hope And Help For Your Nerves.     She was a pioneer in her time and has helped countless people who are suffering.    We call her “Saint Claire”!  😁

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ButterflyHope

Hi Ive just ordered the book Self Help for your nerves. I'm hoping it will help with the intense anxiety I feel at the moment and learn to live with some of the symptoms like tremors and feeling sick. I have realised some of these things I'd be better off accepting may last a long time and not try and fight them. Its hard with anxious thoughts but I hope they will fade or at least decrease in intensity in time. Does anyone else have experience of this and how best to manage the intensity  of overwhelming anxiety during the withdrawal?

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FarmGirlWorks
On 1/9/2016 at 11:51 AM, nz11 said:

(from Claire Weekes): At some point in nervous illness the sufferer may be so ill he no longer cares what happens; however, as he begins to recover, caring returns and this may be complicated by his feeling that although much better, he cannot face the future demands and responsibilities of normal living. At such a time he is often accused of not wanting to get better. Make no mistake, he wants to recover, but at the same time the prospect of coping with the demands of recovery may be so frightening while he is in his present state of only partial recovery, that he almost convinces himself that the criticism may be true – another bewilderment in nervous illness!  

 

Enough time must pass to provide a protective layer of normal responses to help him gradually find his balance and normal living, to take normal reaction for granted.

 

As his body strengthens, his spirits rise, optimism and confidence returned. The process may be so gradual he may be unaware of it. It is this gradualness that makes all possible and only the passage of enough time can bring such gradualness.

That passage from Claire Weekes is helping me cope with this day. I had a powerful weekend and now am in a dark wave that feels different than waves of the past but is filled with fear of the future, napping, and cortisol spikes. I have no job really and fear that I will not be able to make a stable income. I am better than last year when I was sure that I'd be homeless and a zombie on the streets and had SI more often (hourly instead of daily) and less afraid of the change of weather to the darker days. So CW helps by saying that even though one begins to feel better, the fear of recovery may set one back and that only time will restore "normal" responses. Accept and do not struggle -- that is her advice.

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Sebas
On 1/2/2016 at 3:10 AM, Petunia said:

The way I understand her now is that when it comes to the experience of anxiety symptoms, or any unexpected, unexplained symptoms, our natural reaction is to fight them, to try and get rid of them, to struggle with them or try and escape from them, spending vast amounts of energy trying to make them go away, trying to ignore them and keep pushing on with our lives, or we become obsessed with them and spend hours on the internet, trying to find answers. So our whole existence becomes a constant war between us and our symptoms. Of course we become more and more exhausted from fighting this battle all the time and this exhaustion causes more stress which in turn makes our symptoms worse and so we get sicker.

 

Her message is acceptance of the symptoms, letting them be there and floating through what we need to do while the symptoms are allowed to be there for as long as they are. I think this works well for us in recovery from withdrawal because there are things we have to do, things which our symptoms make very difficult. By using her method, we can manage to do what we need to do, without causing further stress and exhaustion by adding 'symptom fighting' to our struggle.

 

By not fighting with our symptoms, but letting them be there, we can retain some of our energy, lower stress and start recovering.

 

Appreciated this contribution 😊

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Rachellynn

Omg. She says to use tranquilizers to go out for the first couple weeks😭

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ChessieCat

Yes, that is very unfortunate, but you have to realise the time that she was practising:

 

Born: 11 April 1903, Died: 2 June 1990

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ChessieCat

I've added a note about this in the first post of this topic, and the Anxiety and Panic Attacks topic.

 

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Rachellynn
On 2/11/2019 at 2:25 PM, ChessieCat said:

Yes, that is very unfortunate, but you have to realise the time that she was practising:

 

Born: 11 April 1903, Died: 2 June 1990

I know. I more mean like...that’s how hard it is for me to leave the house too... i really like her voice tho. Delightful. 

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