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Exercise ... Do more, do less, do nothing? What worked for you?

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Mort81

Im 11 months into WD and I still having lots of trouble with exercise. Somedays I can do light yoga but most days only moderate walking. I used to play sports and exercise 4 -5 days a week.  I cant wait until I can do that again. Ive tried a bit of light weights and moderate Yoga and both are no good . I get bad headaches and overall I feel very weird. 

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JanCarol

I've been knocked to the floor.  Today was gonna be the day I was going back to the "toning table" spa/gym place, I thought that might be gentle enough.

 

Instead, it was too much to even leave the house.  I guess you can't fall off the floor...

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JanCarol

Better - I've gotten a few 10 minute walks in, and a yoga class.  I keep saying I'm going to go to the toning tables, but maybe later this week, I'll be able to.

 

Fingers crossed that the yoga (was good, took mag bath afterwards) wasn't too much!

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erer

While on Cymbalta and tapering I literally often did not have enough strength to get up and walk so exercise was out of the question.

 

Now, off Cymbalta and on other meds and suffering from akathisia I find that the sort of exercises that put most strain on my muscles (Pilates, YogaFunc - seriously, these are really hard  and demanding) and also swimming help with the symptoms of akathisia. Well, strenuous movements are just about the only thing that help with that.

 

So I force myself to do it (I have to, I couldn't handle the symptoms otherwise), although I feel it is just all getting too tiring... fighting the symptoms, doing tiresome exercise... but I have no choice. I am of course afraid of crossing the line where it gets to be too much, but right now I have no other solution for fighting the horrible symptoms when I am alone during the day.

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Athena

Everyone is so different, and I think we each just have to see with trial and error what is helpful for us and what is not. It even changes throughout withdrawal, which makes it even more difficult to adjust! Yes, I also think walking is a wonderful exercise... it counts!!! I like it more now, especially when I can be in a spot with nature and trees. Mort81 I also do light yoga and enjoying it more and more! Some days I can do moderate, and I am so proud after!

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Mort81

Ya I hear Athena its funny when I was  able to do a few yoga sessions I felt the same accomplishments as if I ran a 10k marathon! Its coming back slowly. I feel like I may only be  2 or 3 months away from regular yoga.  Baby steps for now. Light walks will have to do

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Mort81

but your right walking with nature and trees may be one of most therapeutic things we can do !  When I was younger I never even considered walking to be exercise  but I appreciate it so much now 

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Toulouse

I haven't worked out in 2 months - around the time I had a bad hive outbreak, which I think is due to my Paxil weaning.  I still get a few hives almost every day, and was going to wait for them to disappear completely before working out again but I will walk on my treadmill and maybe do some light dumbells at home and see how my body handles it.  Only thing stopping me today is a headache that's been plaguing me the last few days. I will take it slow and see how it goes.

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Horns85

Exercise- I struggle with this. At the beginning of WD I could exercise with no problem. Last 4 months or so, it completely revs up my symptoms, can't sleep and causes racing thoughts!

 

Might be one of the most frustrating things about WD. Every now and then it doesn't bother me and helps, when in a wave it does more harm than good!

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SelmaLady

I can't exercise much at all.  I tried doing a 20 min "brisk" walk every evening and it totally set be back: akathisia, frequent waking during the night, sobbing and other stuff I had not had for a long time.  So disappointed as I was walking by a lake that is near me with husband and doggies and loved it.  Don't know what to do now as my HDL  has tanked and exercise seems to be the only way raise it up...

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Cressida

Benecol significantly raises HDL. Don't know if you are UK. Plant sterols

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freespirit

I can't exercise much at all.  I tried doing a 20 min "brisk" walk every evening and it totally set be back: akathisia, frequent waking during the night, sobbing and other stuff I had not had for a long time.  So disappointed as I was walking by a lake that is near me with husband and doggies and loved it.  Don't know what to do now as my HDL  has tanked and exercise seems to be the only way raise it up...

 

That might be too long or too intense...or possibly, not the best time of day for you to exercise right now. I find I constantly need to adjust the amount of time, intensity, and when I exercise...depending on a number of factors. 

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Junglechicken

Hi all,

 

I just wanted to ask you guys how/why the body is weakened as a result of being off ADs and why we have to take it easy when exercising during withdrawal. 

 

This is getting on for being my 7th week being off Cipralex and I managed to injure my lower back due to running (which I have never done before).  I am also over 40 yrs so this might also be a major contributing factor?

 

Exercising keeps me sane and provides me with an ounce of normality during an otherwise chaotic and unstable life.

 

Who else has injured themselves during withdrawal having done exercise?

 

Thanks,

JC

 

 

 

 

 

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ColdTurkeyinBoston

I'm guessing that you need to be a couple more decades beyond 40 for age to be a contributor to your back injury.

 

You might try cycling instead.

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Junglechicken

I'm guessing that you need to be a couple more decades beyond 40 for age to be a contributor to your back injury.

 

You might try cycling instead.

Thanks for your reply.  So is it in fact the withdrawal that's the cause?

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bluebalu86

I can't exercise much, I can go for long walks. I like walking for hours. That's my limit right now. Anything more strenuous than that I cannot handle. I'm sorry you injured your back, perhaps it was just an accident? Those happen regardless of age and condition. I hope you recover soon. Exercise imo is important for normal and optimal brain functioning, there are also studies that it helps brain regeneration after trauma. But it has to be done reasonably and responsibly, don't overdo it. More is not always better. Take care everyone

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oskcajga

The truth is that no one really knows why many of the withdrawal symptoms exist, and what specifically causes the hypersenitivity. 

 

I recall at one point in my 2 year time frame of suffering from many of the common symptoms of withdrawal, I also managed to really hurt my back - I think it's because I was performing exercise such as walking, but unable to accurately gauge the height my steps - so I would take too large of steps down from steps and such, putting a great deal of strain on my lumbar vertebrae.  I hypothesize that the nerves to my peripheral limbs, etc were affected by the drugs, making it harder for me to accurately gauge pain, and proprioception.  This may feel like a disconnection from limbs, or numbness - that's how it felt to me.  It was quite horrific, felt like someone had injected me with a powerful anesthetic - and yet I was still conscious.  Not fun, not even close to fun or enjoyable - quite injurious actually.

 

I can only assume I'm not the only one who has altered proprioception as a result of those neurons being affected by withdrawal.  Perhaps you did something to your back, like twisted it, or took an awkward step without fully realizing it?  I noticed my lower back was VERY sensitive in early withdrawal as well - even turning or twisting in bed caused a great deal of pain - symptoms similar to a herniated disk (i.e., shootting pain down to my feet and everything).  I was worried I had done some sort of long term damage to my lower back - but miraculously it just sort of disappeared slowly over time, like the rest of the symptoms.

 

That being said, much of my pain, and exercise intolerance has cleared up.  This will not last forever, as the neurons rectify what ever problem is going on, you will regain your ability to do these things, and your pain will probably subside as well.

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Junglechicken

I can't exercise much, I can go for long walks. I like walking for hours. That's my limit right now. Anything more strenuous than that I cannot handle. I'm sorry you injured your back, perhaps it was just an accident? Those happen regardless of age and condition. I hope you recover soon. Exercise imo is important for normal and optimal brain functioning, there are also studies that it helps brain regeneration after trauma. But it has to be done reasonably and responsibly, don't overdo it. More is not always better. Take care everyone

It happened when I was moving furniture ....

My question is, does withdrawal alter our bone/muscle function in such a way that we are more vulnerable and/or prone to injury etc?

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Mort81

Jungle It only temporarily alters functions but Temporarily could mean a few months or a long time -1-2 years.  The fact that you can exercise is pretty darn good. your nervous system is just hyper sensitive so your bones and body may be weaker and wont be able to handle as much weight or exercise but as others have pointed out its just temporary.So ya I would say you are more vulnerable to injury just while withdrawal is strong.  So be careful and be gentile with yourself , overtime you will get your normal strenght and tolerance back.

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Mort81

I also cant exercise yet aswell and it was a huge part of who I was. I played ice hockey twice a week , Yoga, Jogging and some weights.   My most prevalent symptoms are general weakness and stomach discomfort so exercise doesnt go well with that. Only gentile walks. I am really hopeful that during my 2nd year of recovery ill be able to graduate from walks to some light weights and moderate yoga at some point during next year. Ill be so happy!

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ColdTurkeyinBoston

 

It happened when I was moving furniture ....

 

My question is, does withdrawal alter our bone/muscle function in such a way that we are more vulnerable and/or prone to injury etc?

 

 

>  "I managed to injure my lower back due to running"

 

Um - were you running while moving furniture?  No wonder you hurt your back . . .

 

Moving furniture generally isn't considered exercise, although it certainly is physical activity.

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Junglechicken

 

 

It happened when I was moving furniture ....

 

My question is, does withdrawal alter our bone/muscle function in such a way that we are more vulnerable and/or prone to injury etc?

 

 

>  "I managed to injure my lower back due to running"

 

Um - were you running while moving furniture?  No wonder you hurt your back . . .

 

Moving furniture generally isn't considered exercise, although it certainly is physical activity.

 

My first lower back injury was when I got back home after a run 3 weeks ago, I then re-injured it moving furniture - sorry wasn't very clear.

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Cressida

 

I can't exercise much, I can go for long walks. I like walking for hours. That's my limit right now. Anything more strenuous than that I cannot handle. I'm sorry you injured your back, perhaps it was just an accident? Those happen regardless of age and condition. I hope you recover soon. Exercise imo is important for normal and optimal brain functioning, there are also studies that it helps brain regeneration after trauma. But it has to be done reasonably and responsibly, don't overdo it. More is not always better. Take care everyone

It happened when I was moving furniture ....

My question is, does withdrawal alter our bone/muscle function in such a way that we are more vulnerable and/or prone to injury etc?

Well, given that muscle tension is a big part of many people's withdrawal and tense muscles sustain injury much more easily I would assume the answer to be yes

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Junglechicken

 

 

I can't exercise much, I can go for long walks. I like walking for hours. That's my limit right now. Anything more strenuous than that I cannot handle. I'm sorry you injured your back, perhaps it was just an accident? Those happen regardless of age and condition. I hope you recover soon. Exercise imo is important for normal and optimal brain functioning, there are also studies that it helps brain regeneration after trauma. But it has to be done reasonably and responsibly, don't overdo it. More is not always better. Take care everyone

It happened when I was moving furniture ....

My question is, does withdrawal alter our bone/muscle function in such a way that we are more vulnerable and/or prone to injury etc?

Well, given that muscle tension is a big part of many people's withdrawal and tense muscles sustain injury much more easily I would assume the answer to be yes

 

OK, my doctor wants me to have an x-ray to check that the cause isn't a degenerative one.

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stan

 

 

OK, my doctor wants me to have an x-ray to check that the cause isn't a degenerative one.

 

of course, for the doctor  withdrawal do not exist and the cipralex  cannot be the culprit,  he has many people who eat it since years, for him he suspect you degenerate, no luck...

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Mort81

Doctors are out to lunch . Just forget about them. 1 out of every 100 doctors might be knowledgable. They are all brainwashed by the big drug douchbag companies.  From reading the recovery stories approach exercise with caution. Overtime tolerance and strength will continue to get better . Trial and error see what is good for your body and remember its gonna get better

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Junglechicken

Thank you all for your support, you have put my mind at ease....

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Mort81

Ive been trying gentile exercise and its been making me feel a bit stronger the day after but its triggering waves of anxiety and Im not sure why. My only guess would be that my system is so fragile that even the lightest of exercise can create a spark. Or maybe its providing its providing a good boost to my system but it's not used to it resulting in waves of anxiety.

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Petunia

Mort, do you get the waves of anxiety while you are exercising or the day after?

 

edit: I see on another thread you have answered this, you get the increased anxiety the next day. I was going to ask you what kind of exercise you are doing, and I read this:

 

I just started to try and exercise and its as basic as possible. I dont push myself at all. 10 minutes of a bike on lowest level and 10 min of yoga. I don't know about water retention. I haven't felt anything like that. I think walking and light stretching is probably better for me at the moment. It takes so much patience and time during withdrawal its very frustrating

 

This is what I was going to suggest, gentle walking and light stretching for now. If you have akathisia, which is also something you seem to be suggesting in another thread, that's a sign your NS is very sensitive and needs to be treated gently.

 

You may actually be able to do more exercise by doing less. Like maybe go for a 10 minute walk twice a day, then stretch out your muscles when you get home, or while you are walking.

 

If you focus on relaxing and trying to enjoy yourself while walking/stretching, it may reduce the stress factor of 'trying to exercise'

 

This is what I've had to learn how to do. I've caused myself more stress by trying to exercise when I haven't been ready, so now I don't think of it as exercising but as doing something so I can enjoy myself and the feeling of moving my body in comfortable ways.

 

Regular exercise (movement) supports recovery, but only when done within an intensity which doesn't increase symptoms. As we recover, we can do more. People further along in their recovery can do more intense exercise. Some people find that intense exercise improves symptoms, others find it makes them worse. As with everything in withdrawal and tapering, be guided by your own body and symptoms.

Edited by Petunia
Updating

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Mort81

Petunia you make alot of sense here. I am a bit bummed out that my WD has taken such a toll on me physically.  Weakness/Fatigue has been one of my strongest and persisting symptoms during WD.  I would say I was at the extreme end . Standing or walking more than 5-10 minutes would be challenging.  It has let up considerably in the last month but obviously I have a ways to go. I always used exercise as a tool to heal from anxiety ,stress etc... Being such an active person at work and with sports and now being able to do nothing is very hard. Patience is not something Im good at. But I am having to learn on the go. After the new year Ill see If i am ready to take another crack at it. 

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oskcajga

I go through cycles of exercise during this experience - for some periods of time I'll walk nearly every day for an hour at a time for several miles.  Other periods I'll be almost completely sedentary, with absolutely no motivation to do anything and little physical energy to get me off my butt to do energy.  These periods tend to last for weeks at a time. 

 

I can handle high intensity exercise, I've been completely out of breath and exhausted from certain physical activities that I've done - but I just don't feel any "reward" from it - and when I'm lazy, I don't feel any "punishment" for that type of lifestyle.  In the past, I would feel absolutely AWFUL if I didn't exercise - it would be so utterly excruciating, that I had absolutely NO choice other than to get off my butt and go for a jog - but now that's dead, so my automatic safety net for sedentary lifestyle doesn't exist.

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NoMeaning25

Wish i could exercise. I developed severe cellulite on my legs and bum after doing nothing. I hate my body. I had 0 cellulite before this :(

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Theon

but I just don't feel any "reward" from it - and when I'm lazy, I don't feel any "punishment" for that type of lifestyle.  In the past, I would feel absolutely AWFUL if I didn't exercise - it would be so utterly excruciating, that I had absolutely NO choice other than to get off my butt and go for a jog - but now that's dead, so my automatic safety net for sedentary lifestyle doesn't exist.

 

I relate so much to this... It's a direct result from the apathy/anhedonia...

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Junglechicken

Although I'm in a "window", (have been for the last 2 weeks), I did a hard row for 50 mins (10k) on our rowing machine on Friday.  That evening I got the flu-like symptoms a lot of people have mentioned here, so I rested up the next day.  I had also rowed 2 days prior to that due to my TOTM as I didn't feel like being in the pool.

 

Then yesterday we spent the day with friends, had a stressful conversation with them about some of my woes, and my right side pain flared up again.  That's all it took.

 

Today I'm going to carry on and do my pool running or aquacise and will probably do that all week.

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oskcajga

I remember when I was perfectly well and healthy, that an extremely intense exercise bout could mess me up for the entire rest of the day.  I once rowed to exhaustion and could barely function for the rest of that day and into the next day.

 

In withdrawal, I can only imagine this effect potentated exponentially, possibly leading to a week or longer of disability.  I wouldn't dare doing such things in my current state anymore :(

 

Moderate to heavy exercise (running or jogging), rather than extreme exercise (exhaustion exercises, competitive sports, for example) has not affected me adversely and I think it has helped me considerably over the last 6 months.  I've seem more improvements after participating in moderate to heavy exercise than in 1 year of light exercise prior to that.

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